Write Great Dialogue

In this practical guide for aspiring writers of all levels, Irving Weinman, himself a published writer and well-known creative writing tutor, uses case studies to help you explore how to write good dialogue, and gives you a range of fun and ...

Author: Irving Weinman

Publisher: Hachette UK

ISBN: 9781473688520

Category: Language Arts & Disciplines

Page: 192

View: 181

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LEARN HOW TO WRITE CONVINCING AND COMPELLING DIALOGUE. Commissioning editors say good dialogue is one of the first things that make a book stand out from the crowd - and similarly, that clunky direct speech is one of the first things that will send a book straight from the slushpile to the rejections bin. But while many other aspects of writing are pored over in intense detail, there have been very few books on the art of writing successful dialogue. In this practical guide for aspiring writers of all levels, Irving Weinman, himself a published writer and well-known creative writing tutor, uses case studies to help you explore how to write good dialogue, and gives you a range of fun and challenging exercises that will help you to write great dialogue. ABOUT THE SERIES The Teach Yourself Creative Writing series helps aspiring authors tell their story. Covering a range of genres from science fiction and romantic novels, to illustrated children's books and comedy, this series is packed with advice, exercises and tips for unlocking creativity and improving your writing. And because we know how daunting the blank page can be, we set up the Just Write online community at tyjustwrite, for budding authors and successful writers to connect and share.

Writing Great Dialogue

The first of these, The Ninth Hour, is published by Crooked Cat. Claire is part of the team at Kingdom Writing Solutions. Mark Stibbe lives with his wife and Labrador in North Yorkshire and is an award-winning, bestselling author.

Author: Mark Stibbe

Publisher: Createspace Independent Publishing Platform

ISBN: 1518808689

Category: Reference

Page: 62

View: 142

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Claire Stibbe lives with her husband and son in New Mexico and has written two historical fiction novels about Ancient Egypt and is currently writing a series of crime thrillers based in her home city of Albuquerque. The first of these, The Ninth Hour, is published by Crooked Cat. Claire is part of the team at Kingdom Writing Solutions. Mark Stibbe lives with his wife and Labrador in North Yorkshire and is an award-winning, bestselling author. He is now collaborating with New York Times bestselling novelist G.P. Taylor to write a series of Napoleonic spy thrillers. He leads writing workshops in the UK and abroad and is CEO of Kingdom Writing Solutions. Mark and Claire are adopted twins. They started telling stories to each other when they were very young and have both become full-time published authors in recent years.

Write Great Fiction Dialogue

It's packed with innovative exercises and instruction designed to teach you how to: Create dialogue that drives the story Weave dialogue with narrative and action Write dialogue that fits specific genres Avoid the common pitfalls of writing ...

Author: Gloria Kempton

Publisher: Writer's Digest Books

ISBN: UOM:39015067712128

Category: Language Arts & Disciplines

Page: 232

View: 864

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How do some writers craft conversation so authentic, it feels like they've been eavesdropping? What's the secret behind getting characters to talk to each other? How can writers make their dialogue sing? Answers to all of these questions and more can be found in Gloria Kempton's in-depth look at this crucial component of fiction. Readers will learn how to create dialogue that sizzles, with tips on: * Creating dialogue for specific genres * Bringing characters to life with revealing dialogue * Identifying and fixing common dialogue problems Each chapter features numerous examples of successful dialogue drawn from bestselling novels, and chapter-ending exercises help readers apply the lessons learned. This is one book that will get readers talking!

You Talkin to Me

In this book, each chapter will look at a different issue, will analyze the issue, and give examples of great dialogue from films and novels.

Author: Linda Seger

Publisher:

ISBN: 1615933131

Category: Performing Arts

Page: 260

View: 359

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Unlike the chitchat of everyday life, dialogue in stories must express character, advance the story, suggest a theme, and include a few memorable lines that audiences will be quoting for decades to come.The best stories have dialogue that sparkles, but it's easy for inexperienced writers to fall into common pitfalls like creating dialogue that's wooden or too on the nose. Other writers end up with exposition awkwardly inserted into conversations, actors tripping over unnatural phrases, or characters who all speak exactly the same way. In You Talkin' to Me?, Linda Seger and John Winston Rainey are here to help with all your dialogue problems. In each chapter, they explore dialogue from a different angle and discuss examples of great dialogue from films and novels. To cap it all off, each chapter ends with examples of poor dialogue, which are annotated by Linda and then rewritten by John, so readers don't just learn how to recognize when it's done well--they also learn how to make dialogue better. Whether you're writing fiction or nonfiction, for the screen or for the page, this book will get your characters talking.

How To Write Dialogue That Sparkles

NEW AND UPDATED FOR 2019 Reviews of Previous Editions: "This is a great how to on dialogue. This author clearly knows his stuff. I'm writing a book for Kindle as a first time author and this book was very helpful.

Author: Jim Driver

Publisher: Independently Published

ISBN: 1079696059

Category:

Page: 146

View: 656

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The surefire way to improve any novel or screenplay... Dialogue must never be dull, or else your novel or screenplay will fail. Is your dialogue holding you back? As you know, every bestselling novel or blockbuster screenplay has a great story. The other most important aspect is dazzling dialogue. Let editor, author, publisher and critic, Jim Driver show you how writing great dialogue can be fun and simple. Among the topics covered in this concise 26,000 word book: Why dialogue is so important What dialogue is, and what it shouldn't be Four tricks to let your reader know who's speaking... The correct ways to format dialogue (and some interesting ideas you might not have heard of) 8 tricks to make your dialogue instantly more appealing How to tell a story through what people say to each other How to make each and every character sound individual and interesting Ten tips that will improve any dialogue Don't struggle with dialogue any longer. You'll find all the answers you need in this entertaining and concise book. Illustrated with examples from hit screenplays and novels, ranging from Graham Greene, F. Scott Fitzgerald and P.G. Wodehouse via pulp fiction classics, to modern icons such as Breaking Bad, J.K. Rowling, and James Patterson. NEW AND UPDATED FOR 2019 Reviews of Previous Editions: "This is a great how to on dialogue. This author clearly knows his stuff. I'm writing a book for Kindle as a first time author and this book was very helpful." JJ, Amazon.com "I learnt loads from this book. I'm glad that many points and improvements were what I'd been doing already, but there's never any harm in learning more. Definitely recommending this to others!" Amazon Customer, Amazon.co.uk What are you waiting for? Make the move to drastically improve your dialogue writing skills today.

Writing Compelling Dialogue for Film and TV

This book provides writers with an assortment of dialogue and language tools, techniques, and exercises and teaches them how to perceive and understand the function, intent and thematic/psychological elements that dialogue can convey about ...

Author: Loren-Paul Caplin

Publisher: Routledge

ISBN: 9781000203196

Category: Performing Arts

Page: 192

View: 242

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Writing Compelling Dialogue for Film and TV is a practical guide that provides you, the screenwriter, with a clear set of exercises, tools, and methods to raise your ability to hear and discern conversation at a more complex level, in turn allowing you to create better, more nuanced, complex and compelling dialogue. The process of understanding dialogue writing begins with increasing writers’ awareness of what they hear. This book provides writers with an assortment of dialogue and language tools, techniques, and exercises and teaches them how to perceive and understand the function, intent and thematic/psychological elements that dialogue can convey about character, tone, and story. Text, subtext, voice, conflict, exposition, rhythm and style are among the many aspects covered. This book reminds us of the sheer joy of great dialogue and will change and enhance the way writers hear, listen to, and write dialogue, and along the way aid the writers’ confidence in their own voice allowing them to become more proficient writers of dialogue. Written by veteran screenwriter, playwright, and screenwriting professor Loren-Paul Caplin, Writing Compelling Dialogue is an invaluable writing tool for any aspiring screenwriter who wants to improve their ability to write dialogue for film and television, as well as students, professionals, and educators.

Write Great Fiction Revision And Self Editing

[ DIALOGUE ] Here's a little secret: Dialogue is the fastest way to improve your
fiction. That's right. Because sodden, overwritten dialogue sticks out of a
manuscript like a garrulous uncle at Thanksgiving. But if you put crisp dialogue in
your ...

Author: James Scott Bell

Publisher: Penguin

ISBN: 9781599633893

Category: Language Arts & Disciplines

Page: 272

View: 193

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Don't let the revision process intimidate you any longer. Discover how to successfully transform your first draft into a polished final draft readers won't be able to forget. In Write Great Fiction: Revision & Self-Editing, James Scott Bell draws on his experience as a novelist and instructor to provide specific revision tips geared toward the first read-through, as well as targeted self-editing instruction focusing on the individual elements of a novel like plot, structure, characters, theme, voice, style, setting, and endings. You'll learn how to: • Write a cleaner first draft right out of the gate using Bell's plotting principles • Get the most out of revision and self-editing techniques by honing your skills with detailed exercises • Systematically revise a completed draft using the ultimate revision checklist that talks you through the core story elements Whether you're in the process of writing a novel, have a finished draft you don't know what to do with, or have a rejected manuscript you don't know how to fix, Revision & Self-Editing gives you the guidance you need to write and revise like a pro.

Talk the Talk

With 20 simple lessons, plus writing exercises, this book gives scripwriters a complete tool kit for mastering the art of dialogue writing.

Author: Penny Penniston

Publisher:

ISBN: 193290770X

Category: Performing Arts

Page: 242

View: 928

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With 20 simple lessons, plus writing exercises, this book gives scripwriters a complete tool kit for mastering the art of dialogue writing.

Screenplay

Author: Syd Field

Publisher: Delta

ISBN: 9780385339032

Category: Performing Arts

Page: 320

View: 521

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Providing examples from well-known movies, a revised handbook explains the structural and stylistic elements as well as writing techniques basic to the creation of a successful film script and furnishes practical tips on script writing for original productions, sequels, novel adaptations, and adaptations by original authors. Original. 17,500 first printing.

Writing Dialogue

[ This is ) one of the best books about writing I ' ve ever read , with a strong ,
entertaining voice that gives it the feel of a witty novel about writing . You ' ll write
better dialogue after you ' ve read it . Writing teachers would be crazy to ignore it .

Author: Tom Chiarella

Publisher: Story Press

ISBN: 1884910327

Category: Reference

Page: 176

View: 539

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Whether you're writing an argument, a love scene, a powwow among sixth graders or scientists in a lab, this book demonstrates how to write dialogue that sounds authentic and original. &break;&break;You'll learn ways to find ideas for literary discussions by tuning in to what you hear every day. You'll learn to use gestures instead of speech, to insert silences that are as effective as outbursts, to add shifts in tone, and other strategies for making conversations more compelling. Nuts and bolts are covered, too - formatting, punctuation, dialogue tags - everything you need to get your characters talking.

The Great Conversation Pre Socratics through Descartes

Some philosophers are important just for what they say or write. Others are
important also for what they are — for their personality and character. No better
example of the latter exists than Socrates. Socrates wrote nothing, save some
poetry ...

Author: Norman Melchert

Publisher: McGraw-Hill Humanities, Social Sciences & World Languages

ISBN: 1559344768

Category: Philosophy

Page: 344

View: 818

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Fiction Writer s Workshop

First : Dialogue does not accomplish everything , so don ' t despair if you don ' t
trust yours . Some writers — Gabriel Garcia Márquez , for example - depend
much more on narrative than on dialogue and yet write great fiction . Just as you
can ...

Author: Josip Novakovich

Publisher: Story Press

ISBN: UOM:39015037311498

Category: Reference

Page: 250

View: 866

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Josip Novakovich teaches fiction with the authority of a successful writer, the flair of a favorite professor and the excitement of a life-long student. This interactive workshop helps students write fiction, not just read about it. Explore each aspect of the art of fiction through: -- sources of fiction -- setting character and plot -- point of view and voice -- scene and dialogue -- beginnings and endings -- description and word choice All chapters close with a series of writing exercises to help readers put the elements into action. This learn-by-doing guide will help students write, improve and expand their fiction.

The Teen centered Writing Club

If your dialogue does those three things , you ' ve done a great job ! But
sometimes , you ' ll want to do more . When you ' re ready to take on the biggest
challenge of all , try using dialogue to give the reader some information . To do
this well ...

Author: Constance Hardesty

Publisher: Libraries Unltd Incorporated

ISBN: UOM:39015079334143

Category: Language Arts & Disciplines

Page: 174

View: 573

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Presents advice for setting up a teen writing club in a school or public library, discussing program planning, advertising to potential clients, writing activities, staffing, coaching, and tips for publishing completed works.

Margaret Storm Jameson

This late novel isn''t discussed in Writing in Dialogue. Nor are quite a few others. I grant that not all are important.

Author: Jennifer Birkett

Publisher: Cambridge Scholars Pub

ISBN: 1847181821

Category: Biography & Autobiography

Page: 214

View: 424

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From her birth in Whitby in 1891, to her death in Cambridge in 1986, Margaret Storm Jameson's life and writing spanned the greater part of the twentieth century. She was, in every sense, a woman of her time, speaking to the long series of generations she lived through of their collective present, past and future. Out of her own life-history she created a mirror reflecting the long twentieth-century transformation of Europe. This collection of essays, the first volume to be devoted entirely to Jameson, brings together a distinguished group of academics to analyse the impressive range and variety of her work. Their studies follow the chronology of her career from the 1920s to the 1960s. They review the different modes in which she wrote (fiction, journalism, autobiography), and show how effectively her writing engages with the contested issues of the period (socialism, fascism, pacifism, exile, communism, colonialism) and with key historical events (the First World War, the General Strike, the Munich Pact, the Second World War, the Cold War). They place her writing in relation to other writers of the day, both her English connections and her European models, in order to underline its relevance, recover forgotten networks of activism and collaboration, and restore Jameson to the pivotal role she played during her lifetime. In the process, the conventional categorisations of twentieth-century writing come under pressure: reviewing Jameson's links with early modernist journals, and highlighting overlooked connections between British and Continental modernisms, these essays help redefine the field of modernist studies. The collection closes with a sequence of unpublished letters from Jameson to the feminist, historian, and social activist Hilary Newitt Brown, a lively, first-hand account of literary, political and everyday life in England during the Second World War. Jameson was first and foremost a stylist, whose work on the relations of aesthetics and politics challenges simplistic critical divides between modernism and documentary realism. She was a key activist in politics and cultural politics, and an analyst of feeling, and the part it plays in both politics and everyday life. Last but not least, she was a chronicler of public life, and of the collective experience of England and Europe in the twentieth century. This volume proposes a re-assessment of Jameson's overall significance in the writerly landscape of her time; in the process, it suggests perspectives in which that landscape is itself ripe for revision. For someone who published so many novels, among them ones of real distinction, Storm Jameson was unusually prone to self doubt. 'Its singular badness proves that I was not a born novelist', she remarked of her early and very interesting novel, The Pot Boils (1919), and in her autobiography, Journey From the North, she more than once suggests that her chosen career was a mistake, or at all events led to no great achievement. That she rarely made much money from her novels is true. Yet as every page of the autobiography shows, and as a cache of letters included in the present book further reveals, Jameson was a born writer. These letters, which have never before been published and which perhaps provide the book's high point, were written over a period of some fifty years to her close friends, Hilary Newitt Brown and Harrison Brown, an English couple who, foreseeing the coming of the Second World War, in 1937 settled in British Columbia and to whom Jameson could talk with unabashed candour - for example, of her fearful loathing of Hitler and fascism, of her contempt for most politicians, and of her sense of outrage at the pusillanimity, backsliding and ill faith of officialdom in wavering about whether to grant refugee status to writers and intellectuals she was trying to get out of continental Europe before the Nazis got to them. Jameson was deeply involved in P.E.N., whose English president she became in 1939, but this alone won't account for her hard work on behalf of other writers. These letters are vivid testimony of the tensions, fears and difficulties of the times, both before, during and after the war. But what makes them so appealing is Jameson's often excoriating wit. Of Chamberlain's relationship with the French government in 1938, she remarks: 'it isn't true C let the French down. He didn't have to this time. They were taking the lift down so fast he had to run to get into it' (p.185). And, in 1940, with Britain under siege, she notes, 'I don't know where the Munich spirit is, I mean, what stone it has crawled under. No doubt you could lift a stone or two and find things come crawling out. I know where one or two such stones lie. But the ordinary people are fine' (p.193). The essays that make up Writing in Dialogue rightly consider some of the ways in which Jameson finds fictional form in which to explore her awareness that the worth of 'ordinary people' is threatened by forces that they must try to control or be controlled and oppressed by. Her writing career more or less coincides with what Eric Hobsbawm has called 'The Age of Extremes' - that is, 1913-1989 - and her novels try to account for the age's dark, violent forces, and at the same time, and despite a period as a pacifist and although she was a committed socialist, try not to buy into any of what Orwell, with pugnacious relish, called 'the smelly little orthodoxies that contend daily for our souls.' As the editors remark in their Introduction, 'Jameson has suffered from the tendency in feminist scholarship to focus solely on female writing for its representation of women's lives and to ignore their political work except in terms of their feminism' (p. 3). In this context, it is notable that Rosamond Lehmann is quoted as finding Jameson's 'Munich' novel, Europe to Let, 'electrifying and ferocious', and motivated by a 'a passionate disgust and indignation combined with a masculine intelligence.' I'm surprised that Kate McLoughlin, who quotes this in her interesting essay, 'Voices and Values: Storm Jameson's Europe to Let and the Munich Pact', doesn't consider the implications of that phrase 'masculine intelligence'; but other essays engage with the formal consequences of Jameson's determination to produce novels of ideas. Hence, Briganti's 'Mirroring the Darkness: Storm Jameson and the Collective Novel' - though in any discussion of the trilogy Mirror in Darkness (1934-36) I would have thought it worthwhile to consider Dos Passos's 1920s U.S.A. trilogy, given the impact it made overseas as well as in America, and in view of its author's professed communist sympathies. Hence, too, Sharon Ouditt's valuable essay on the 'Men, Women and World War I in the Fiction of Storm Jameson' - though, if, as Ouditt shows, Jameson had to overcome the prejudice against women being non-combatants and thus 'at best peripheral to war' (p. 57), I don't see why Arnold Bennett's The Pretty Lady (1918) shouldn't come into the reckoning, given that Bennett was also a non-combatant and yet for my money produced one of the very best novels to emerge from that period, one that deals quite brilliantly with the effects of war on the home front. Hence, too, Jennifer Birkett's insistence that Jameson looked to writers outside England for her peers. In her pages on 'The Shape of Evil: Before the Crossing and The Black Laurel', and especially in her telling remark on Jameson's 'self-flagellating insight into the necessary cruelty of authorial vision' (p. 130), Birkett as good as buries Angus Wilson's contention in The Wild Garden (1963) that English novelists have been unable to write about evil. Given Dickens's novels, this was anyway a fairly daft claim. But Wilson's intention was to rebuke English readers not so much for a complacent humanism as for their indifference to those novels of ideas he associated with continental Europe. As a corrective to such indifference he could have looked closer to home. He could and indeed should have looked to Jameson. And as someone who himself could be properly satiric about the pretensions and venality of the literary life, Wilson should have been much taken by Jameson's 1962 novel, The Road From the Monument, a most subtle dissection of male vanity, egoism, and self-deception. This late novel isn't discussed in Writing in Dialogue. Nor are quite a few others. I grant that not all are important. Others however are, and it would have been good to see them at least mentioned. (The so-called comedies are for the most part ignored.) Still, you can't have everything and Writing in Dialogue gives us a good deal. The essays are consistently interesting, readable, informative, and without an air of special pleading. With their publication we can reasonably hope that the reputation of this important novelist is now on the mend. John Lucas, Key Words, A journal of Cultural Materialism - Nottingham Trent University

How to Write a Script with Dialogue That Doesn t Suck

Discover How to Master Screenplay Dialogue!Want to learn how to write GREAT screenplay dialogue? (But not sure how to get started?)Have a killer story idea but confused on how to make sure your characters sound like humans? (Not robots!) ...

Author: Michael Rogan

Publisher: Createspace Independent Publishing Platform

ISBN: 153911046X

Category:

Page: 106

View: 109

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Discover How to Master Screenplay Dialogue! Want to learn how to write GREAT screenplay dialogue? (But not sure how to get started?) Have a killer story idea but confused on how to make sure your characters sound like humans? (Not robots!) Fear not, intrepid screenwriter! Because in "How to Write a Script With Dialogue That Doesn't suck," former screenplay reader and optioned screenwriter, Michael Rogan, shows you: - What the $^&# Dialogue is Supposed to Do - How to Steal Your Way to Awesome Dialogue - 3 Tips for Writing Exposition That Doesn't Put Readers in a Coma - How to Cut and Mutilate Your Dialogue (for Maximum Awesomeness) - 4 Keys to Making Sure All Your Characters Don't All Sound the Same ...and so much more! And each chapter includes easy-to-follow action steps to help you boost your screenwriting IQ - without taking a single $2,000 seminar. You CAN master screenplay dialogue! (Even if you think you suck at dialogue.) So, why not begin your quest to world-class screenwriting awesomeness...today!

The Twentieth Century

see a great reduction of gesture and mere ranting on our modern stage , and
actors convey their meaning by quieter and ... Constantly some of our best literary
men do try to write a play for the actual stage to - day , and when they do not ...
This is quite apart from the dialogue , but without it the best dialogue is of no avail
.

Author:

Publisher:

ISBN: UOM:39015014761335

Category: Nineteenth century

Page:

View: 917

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The Nineteenth Century

3 see a great reduction of gesture and mere ranting on our modern stage , and
actors convey their meaning by quieter and ... Constantly some of our best literary
men do try to write a play for the actual stage to - day , and when they do not ...
This is quite apart from the dialogue , but without it the best dialogue is of no avail
.

Author:

Publisher:

ISBN: HARVARD:32044092765346

Category:

Page:

View: 937

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Household Words

... than the citizens of a free | Besides Mr . Sims ' s really remarkable power of
dramatic construction , country . he has the advantage of being able to write
excellent dialogue , and his sketches of humorous character are of the very best
school .

Author:

Publisher:

ISBN: COLUMBIA:0021976481

Category:

Page:

View: 946

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Writing Great Screenplays for Film and TV

The reason for this type of impact is that , in general , dialogue is better at
expressing thoughts than emotions . If you intend to convey an emotion , consider
whether there ' s an action or gesture that would express the feeling more
effectively ...

Author: Dona Cooper

Publisher: MacMillan Publishing Company

ISBN: 067184783X

Category: Creative writing

Page: 189

View: 672

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Revised to cover the latest techniques for crafting first-rate screen plays for film and TV, this 2nd edition provides advice on innovative ideas for structuring the plot, developing characters and building momentum, professional guidance on marketing and a concise encyclopedia of screen-writing techniques.

How To Write Awesome Dialogue For Fiction Film and Theatre

What people are saying about Tom Leveen’s dialogue, voice, and character: Party “I must say that I’m absolutely in awe of Leveen’s ability to build such distinct and totally believable voice for eleven characters [protagonists] in ...

Author: Tom Leveen

Publisher: FTJ Creative LLC

ISBN:

Category: Performing Arts

Page: 181

View: 340

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Rejection e-mails from agents and editors clogging your inbox? Getting the same rejection slips over and over again? It could be pacing, plot, narrative engine . . . or maybe what your characters say just isn't getting the job done. Outstanding dialogue is often the difference between a good book and a great book. How does yours stack up? With nine books published with imprints of Random House, Abrams, and Simon & Schuster, and more than twenty years of experience as an actor and director, author, writing teacher, and Bram Stoker Award Finalist Tom Leveen guides you through everything you need to improve your writing, make your dialogue shine, and get your book noticed and talked about by readers, agents, and editors alike! Learn how to start with a great plot and conflict to form the foundation of awesome dialogue Discover actors’ techniques to give your characters strength and purpose Improve on setting scenes and building relationships between characters and more! What people are saying about Tom Leveen’s dialogue, voice, and character: Party “I must say that I’m absolutely in awe of Leveen’s ability to build such distinct and totally believable voice for eleven characters [protagonists] in one novel.” ~ fortheloveofya.com Zero “Well written, with a distinct and fantastically done voice, Zero is an unflinching must read.” ~ agoodaddiction.blogspot.com “[H]is voice is fresh and strong and consistent.” ~ scratchingcat.wordpress.com “Part of what makes the book, and the voice, believable is Leveen’s ability to channel a teenage girl and make her real. It’s all there—the insecurity, the bravado, the conflicting feelings about sex, the sense that your whole life is in front of you, which is both exhilarating and paralyzing.” ~ The Phoenix New Times manicpixiedreamgirl “[I]t’s the relationships between the novel’s teenage characters that are the real standouts. Tyler’s crass banter with his buddies, his snarky but supportive relationship with his sister, and his botched dealings with both Becky and Sydney are entirely realistic.” ~ Publisher’s Weekly “Tom Leveen has a unique voice and writes interesting male characters, so I was intrigued to check out his latest book manicpixiedreamgirl. Leveen’s characters are usually creative types and not the typical leading men you see in YA. . . . I thought the male voice in manicpixiedreamgirl was very strong and unique.” ~ thereadingdate.com Random “Author Tom Leveen presents a powerful story with a plot so real, readers will be gripped from the very first page.” ~ readingjunky.blogspot.com Sick “[Leveen] really nails the ‘guy’ dialogue as well—it is gross, colorful, and at times, downright funny.” ~ VOYA (Voice of Youth Advocates) “In an exciting take on the zombie novel, Leveen … shifts to horror while maintaining his trademark complex relationships and character-driven storytelling.” ~ Publisher’s Weekly “Tom Leveen’s voice is truly one of the best elements…” ~ blog.homoeoteleuton.com Shackled “The prose is tight and the dialogue lends emotion to the character’s mental state, properly complementing this plot-driven setup.” ~ School Library Journal “…impeccably written with true-to-life dialogue and characters I can relate to…” ~ literologie.com