Women Crime and Custody in Victorian England

This superbly researched and innovative book approaches the protection oftrade secrets in the civil law and common law traditions and examinesdoctrinal and policy issues from that comparative perspective.

Author: Lucia Zedner

Publisher: Oxford University Press on Demand

ISBN: STANFORD:36105041416368

Category: History

Page: 364

View: 945

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This superbly researched and innovative book approaches the protection oftrade secrets in the civil law and common law traditions and examinesdoctrinal and policy issues from that comparative perspective. With detailedattention to the legal position in the major countries in each tradition, itillustrates the approaches that figure prominent

Women Crime and Custody in Victorian England

Zedner's rigorously researched study examines the extent to which gender-based ideologies influenced attitudes to female criminality.

Author: Lucia Zedner

Publisher: Oxford University Press

ISBN: 019820552X

Category: History

Page: 364

View: 393

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Victorian England women made up a far larger proportion of those known to be involved in crime than they do today: the nature of female criminality attracted considerable attention and preoccupied those trying to provide for women within the penal system. Zedner's rigorously researched study examines the extent to which gender-based ideologies influenced attitudes to female criminality.

Women Crime and Justice in England since 1660

L. Zedner, Women, Crime and Custody in Victorian England (Oxford: Clarendon Press, 1991), p. 135; S. McConville, Next Only to Death: English Local Prisons, 1860–1900 (London: Routledge, 1995), pp. 206–9, 336. 58. N. Walker, 'Crime and ...

Author: Shani D'Cruze

Publisher: Macmillan International Higher Education

ISBN: 9781137156907

Category: History

Page: 240

View: 983

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Shani D'Cruze and Louise A. Jackson provide students with a lively overview of women's relationship to the criminal justice system in England, exploring key debates in the regulation of 'respectable' and 'deviant' femininities over the last four centuries. Major issues include: • attitudes towards murder and infanticide * prostitution • the decline of witchcraft belief * sexual violence • the 'girl delinquent' * theft and fraud The volume also examines women's participation in illegal forms of protest and political activism, their experience of penal regimes as well as strategies of resistance, and their involvement in occupations associated with criminal justice itself. Assuming that men and women cannot be studied in isolation, D'Cruze and Jackson make reference to recent studies of masculinity and comment on the ways in which relations between men and women have been understood and negotiated across time. Featuring examples drawn from a rich range of sources such as court records, autobiographies, literature and film, this is an ideal introduction to an increasingly popular area of study.

A History of Criminal Justice in England and Wales

prominence of women among the defendants, together help to explain some of the sense of panic in those years about the levels and character of property crime and the anxiety to ... (1991) Women, Crime and Custody in Victorian England.

Author: John Hostettler

Publisher: Waterside Press

ISBN: 9781906534790

Category: Law

Page: 352

View: 181

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"An ideal introduction to the rich history of criminal justice charting all its main developments from the dooms of Anglo-Saxon times to the rise of the Common Law, struggles for political, legislative and judicial ascendency and the formation of the innovative Criminal Justice System of today."-back cover.

Crime and Law in England 1750 1840

Although his much quoted article on ' The criminality of women in eighteenth - century England ' did not cover these issues , John Beattie's ... 1991 ) ; and L. Zedner ; Women , Crime and Custody in Victorian England ( Oxford , 1991 ) .

Author: Peter King

Publisher: Cambridge University Press

ISBN: 113945949X

Category: History

Page:

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How was law made in England in the eighteenth and early nineteenth centuries? Through detailed studies of what the courts actually did, Peter King argues that parliament and the Westminster courts played a less important role in the process of law making than is usually assumed. Justice was often remade from the margins by magistrates, judges and others at the local level. His book also focuses on four specific themes - gender, youth, violent crime and the attack on customary rights. In doing so it highlights a variety of important changes - the relatively lenient treatment meted out to women by the late eighteenth century, the early development of the juvenile reformatory in England before 1825, i.e. before similar changes on the continent or in America, and the growing intolerance of the courts towards everyday violence. This study is invaluable reading to anyone interested in British political and legal history.

In Search of Criminal Responsibility

69 See, for example, Lucia Zedner, Women, Crime, and Custody in Victorian England Parts I and III; Frances Heidensohn, Women and Crime (London: Macmillan 1985); Ngaire Naffine, Feminism and Criminology (Oxford: Polity Press 1997).

Author: Nicola Lacey

Publisher: Oxford University Press

ISBN: 9780191084065

Category: Law

Page: 200

View: 332

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What makes someone responsible for a crime and therefore liable to punishment under the criminal law? Modern lawyers will quickly and easily point to the criminal law's requirement of concurrent actus reus and mens rea, doctrines of the criminal law which ensure that someone will only be found criminally responsible if they have committed criminal conduct while possessing capacities of understanding, awareness, and self-control at the time of offense. Any notion of criminal responsibility based on the character of the offender, meaning an implication of criminality based on reputation or the assumed disposition of the person, would seem to today's criminal lawyer a relic of the 18th Century. In this volume, Nicola Lacey demonstrates that the practice of character-based patterns of attribution was not laid to rest in 18th Century criminal law, but is alive and well in contemporary English criminal responsibility-attribution. Building upon the analysis of criminal responsibility in her previous book, Women, Crime, and Character, Lacey investigates the changing nature of criminal responsibility in English law from the mid-18th Century to the early 21st Century. Through a combined philosophical, historical, and socio-legal approach, this volume evidences how the theory behind criminal responsibility has shifted over time. The character and outcome responsibility which dominated criminal law in the 18th Century diminished in ideological importance in the following two centuries, when the idea of responsibility as founded in capacity was gradually established as the core of criminal law. Lacey traces the historical trajectory of responsibility into the 21st Century, arguing that ideas of character responsibility and the discourse of responsibility as founded in risk are enjoying a renaissance in the modern criminal law. These ideas of criminal responsibility are explored through an examination of the institutions through which they are produced, interpreted and executed; the interests which have shaped both doctrines and institutions; and the substantive social functions which criminal law and punishment have been expected to perform at different points in history.

Crime Policing and Punishment in England 1750 1914

Mayhew, for example, used the term to describe coster-women who were not formally married but, in all other respects, lived with their partners as man and wife. Cited in L. Zedner, Women, Crime and Custody in Victorian England, ...

Author: David Taylor

Publisher: Macmillan International Higher Education

ISBN: 9781349271054

Category: Crime

Page: 224

View: 437

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The prison, that most lasting legacy of Victorian England, was the dominant site of punishment, society was more heavily policed, and court procedures had become longer, more formal and more concerned with the rights of the defendant. This book offers a comprehensive and up-to-date account of these important developments. As well as looking at the underlying causes of change in the criminal justice system, the book concludes with a consideration of the ways in which the evolution of modern society has been shaped by the developments in the criminal justice system.

Women s History Britain 1850 1945

Perhaps between 10 per cent and 17 per cent: L.Zedner, Women, crime and custody in Victorian England (Oxford: Oxford University Press, 1991), pp. 18–23. 73. The significant exception is Zedner, Women, crime and custom; ...

Author: June Purvis

Publisher: Routledge

ISBN: 9781135367091

Category: History

Page: 352

View: 726

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Women's History: Britain 1850-1945 introduces the main themes and debates of feminist history during this period of change, and brings together the findings of new research. It examines the suffrage movement, race and empire, industrialisation, the impact of war and womens literature. Specialists in their own fields have each written a chapter on a key aspect of womens lives including health, the family, education, sexuality, work and politics. Each contribution provides an overview of the main issues and debates within each area and offers suggestions for further reading. It not only provides an invaluable introduction to every aspect of womens participation in the political, social and economic history of Britain, but also brings the reader up to date with current historical thinking on the study of womens history itself.

Victorian Murderesses

Shani D'Cruze and Louise Jackson examine women, crime, and justice in England since the 1660s; Sandra Wells and Betty Alt's Wicked Women discusses female serial killers and gang members from the fifteenth century to the present.

Author: Naz Bulamur

Publisher: Cambridge Scholars Publishing

ISBN: 9781443888677

Category: Literary Criticism

Page: 185

View: 768

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Victorian Murderesses investigates the politics of female violence in Thomas Hardy’s Tess of the D’Urbervilles (1891), George Eliot’s Adam Bede (1859), Mary Braddon’s Lady Audley’s Secret (1862), and Florence Marryat’s The Blood of the Vampire (1897). The controversial figure of the murderess in these four novels challenges the assumption that women are essentially nurturing and passive and that violence and aggression are exclusively male traits. By focusing on the representations of murder committed by women, this book demonstrates how legal and even medical discourses endorsed Victorian domestic ideology, as female criminals were often locked up in asylums and publicly executed without substantial evidence. While paying close attention to the social, economic, judicial, and political dynamics of Victorian England, this interdisciplinary study also tackles the question of female agency, as the novels simultaneously portray women as perpetrators of murder and excuse their socially unacceptable traits of anger and violence by invoking heredity and madness. Although the four novels tend to undercut female power and attribute violence to adulterous women, they are revolutionary enough to deploy female characters who rebel against male sovereignty and their domestic roles by stabbing their rapists and even killing their newborns. Victorian studies on gender and violence focus primarily on female victims of sexual harassment, and real and fictional male killers like Dracula and Jack the Ripper. Victorian Murderesses contributes to the field by investigating how literary representations of female violence counter the idealisation of women as angelic housewives.

Liberty and Authority in Victorian Britain

See his Coercion, Contract, and Free Labor in the Nineteenth Century (Cambridge, 2001). 9 Lucia Zedner, Women, Crime and Custody in Victorian England(Oxford, 1991), 152. See also Seán McConville, English Local Prisons, 1860–1900: Next ...

Author: Peter Mandler

Publisher: Oxford University Press on Demand

ISBN: 9780199271337

Category: History

Page: 254

View: 413

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Victorian Britain is often considered as the high point of 'laissez-faire', the place and the time when people were most 'free' to make their own lives without the aid or interference of the State. This book explores the truth of that assumption and what it might mean. It considers what the Victorian State did or did not do, what were the prevailing definitions and practices of 'liberty', what other sources of discipline and authority existed beyond the State to structure people'slives - in sum, what were the broad conditions under which such a profound belief in 'liberty' could flourish, and a complex society be run on those principles. Contributors include leading scholars in British political, social and cultural history, so that 'liberty' is seen in the round, not justas a set of ideas or of political slogans, but also as a public and private philosophy that structured everyday life. Consideration is also given to the full range of British subjects in the nineteenth century - men, women, people of all classes, from all parts of the British Isles - and to placing the British experience in a global and comparative perspective.