Issues and Challenges in Science Education Research

Acknowledging the issues and challenges in science education, this book hopes to generate collaborative discussions among scholars, researchers, and educators to develop critical and creative ways of science teaching to improve and enrich ...

Author: Kim Chwee Daniel Tan

Publisher: Springer Science & Business Media

ISBN: 9789400739802

Category: Science

Page: 352

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In contemporary society, science constitutes a significant part of human life in that it impacts on how people experience and understand the world and themselves. The rapid advances in science and technology, newly established societal and cultural norms and values, and changes in the climate and environment, as well as, the depletion of natural resources all greatly impact the lives of children and youths, and hence their ways of learning, viewing the world, experiencing phenomena around them and interacting with others. These changes challenge science educators to rethink the epistemology and pedagogy in science classrooms today as the practice of science education needs to be proactive and relevant to students and prepare them for life in the present and in the future. Featuring contributions from highly experienced and celebrated science educators, as well as research perspectives from Europe, the USA, Asia and Australia, this book addresses theoretical and practical examples in science education that, on the one hand, plays a key role in our understanding of the world, and yet, paradoxically, now acknowledges a growing number of uncertainties of knowledge about the world. The material is in four sections that cover the learning and teaching of science from science literacy to multiple representations; science teacher education; the use of innovations and new technologies in science teaching and learning; and science learning in informal settings including outdoor environmental learning activities. Acknowledging the issues and challenges in science education, this book hopes to generate collaborative discussions among scholars, researchers, and educators to develop critical and creative ways of science teaching to improve and enrich the lives of our children and youths.

Student generated Digital Media in Science Education

This book will inspire science academics and science teacher educators to design learning experiences that allow students to take control of their own learning, to generate media that will stimulate them to engage with, learn about, and ...

Author: Garry Hoban

Publisher: Routledge

ISBN: 9781317563242

Category: Education

Page: 254

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"This timely and innovative book encourages us to ‘flip the classroom’ and empower our students to become content creators. Through creating digital media, they will not only improve their communication skills, but also gain a deeper understanding of core scientific concepts. This book will inspire science academics and science teacher educators to design learning experiences that allow students to take control of their own learning, to generate media that will stimulate them to engage with, learn about, and become effective communicators of science." Professors Susan Jones and Brian F. Yates, Australian Learning and Teaching Council Discipline Scholars for Science "Represents a giant leap forward in our understanding of how digital media can enrich not only the learning of science but also the professional learning of science teachers." Professor Tom Russell, Queen’s University, Ontario, Canada "This excellent edited collection brings together authors at the forefront of promoting media creation in science by children and young people. New media of all kinds are the most culturally significant forms in the lives of learners and the work in this book shows how they can move between home and school and provide new contexts for learning as well as an understanding of key concepts." Dr John Potter, London Knowledge Lab, Dept. of Culture, Communication and Media, University College London, UK Student-generated Digital Media in Science Education supports secondary school teachers, lecturers in universities and teacher educators in improving engagement and understanding in science by helping students unleash their enthusiasm for creating media within the science classroom. Written by pioneers who have been developing their ideas in students’ media making over the last 10 years, it provides a theoretical background, case studies, and a wide range of assignments and assessment tasks designed to address the vital issue of disengagement amongst science learners. It showcases opportunities for learners to use the tools that they already own to design, make and explain science content with five digital media forms that build upon each other— podcasts, digital stories, slowmation, video and blended media. Each chapter provides advice for implementation and evidence of engagement as learners use digital tools to learn science content, develop communication skills, and create science explanations. A student team’s music video animation of the Krebs cycle, a podcast on chemical reactions presented as commentary on a boxing match, a wiki page on an entry in the periodic table of elements, and an animation on vitamin D deficiency among hijab-wearing Muslim women are just some of the imaginative assignments demonstrated. Student-generated Digital Media in Science Education illuminates innovative ways to engage science learners with science content using contemporary digital technologies. It is a must-read text for all educators keen to effectively convey the excitement and wonder of science in the 21st century.

Education Management and Management Science

Plans such as MOOCs have changed the traditional way of teaching and learning. ... conforms to the characteristics of decentralization and deliberative democracy, provides a way to improve the transparency of university governance.

Author: Dawei Zheng

Publisher: CRC Press

ISBN: 9781315752143

Category: Business & Economics

Page: 710

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This proceedings volume contains selected papers presented at the 2014 International Conference on Education Management and Management Science (ICEMMS 2014), held August 7-8, 2014, in Tianjin, China. The objective of ICEMMS2014 is to provide a platform for researchers, engineers, academicians as well as industrial professionals from all over the wo

How Chinese Teach Mathematics and Improve Teaching

International Journal of Science and Mathematics Education, 7, 36–38. Xun, Z. (2006). Headstream of the “HeavenEarthSovereignParentTeacher” Ethic Order. Journal of Beijing Normal University (Social science), 2, 99–106. Yang, D. (2009).

Author: Yeping Li

Publisher: Routledge

ISBN: 9781136273551

Category: Education

Page: 272

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How Chinese Teach Mathematics and Improve Teaching builds upon existing studies to examine mathematics classroom instruction in China. It combines contributions from Chinese scholars with commentary from key Western scholars to offer multiple perspectives in viewing and learning about some important and distinctive features of mathematics classroom instruction. Viewing classroom instruction as part of teachers’ instructional practices, this book goes beyond teachers’ in-classroom instructional practice by also examining Chinese teachers’ approaches and practices in developing and improving teaching. Through this unique approach, How Chinese Teach Mathematics and Improve Teaching expands and unpacks the otherwise fragmented knowledge about Chinese practices in developing and carrying out mathematics classroom instruction. This book is indispensible reading for those interested in Chinese practices in mathematics teaching, and is a key book for teacher educators, school administrators and policy makers in expanding ways of supporting and helping mathematics teachers in instructional development and improvement.

K 12 Math and Science Education what is Being Done to Improve It

The Team Science teachers have been teaching and continue to teach other teachers how to use these technology tools . ... Physical and Mathematical Sciences and the College of Education and Psychology at North Carolina State University ...

Author: United States. Congress. House. Committee on Science. Subcommittee on Technology

Publisher:

ISBN: MINN:31951P00472793A

Category: Educational accountability

Page: 239

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Statistics of Land grant Colleges and Universities

This manual shows how general science teachers , especially those in small towns , may enrich their teaching by aids of ... of science as a subject in secondary education is sketched , and the organization of material , teaching methods ...

Author: United States. Office of Education

Publisher:

ISBN: UOM:39015039483261

Category: Agricultural colleges

Page:

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Using Transformative Learning Theory to Investigate Ways to Enrich University Teaching

More specifically, through a qualitative methodology and employing transformative learning theory, this work evaluated the influence of science instructors' engagement in dialogue and critical self-reflection on their teaching approaches ...

Author: Ioana Alexandra Badara

Publisher:

ISBN: OCLC:747099651

Category:

Page: 213

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Previous studies have reported high attrition rates in large-enrollment science courses where teacher-centered instruction was prevalent. The scientific literature provides strong evidence that student-centered teaching, which involves extensive active learning, leads to deepened learning as the result of effective student engagement. Consequently, professional development initiatives have continually focused on assisting academics with the implementation of active learning. Generally, higher education institutions engage faculty in professional development through in-service workshops that facilitate learning new teaching techniques in a specific context. These workshops usually do not include self-scrutiny concerning teaching or do they provide continuous support for the implementation of strategies learned in the workshop. The purpose of this study was to explore the influence of a professional development program that consisted of a workshop focused on the implementation of active learning in large science courses and extended to include post-workshop activities, on participants' enactment of teaching practices introduced in the workshop. More specifically, through a qualitative methodology and employing transformative learning theory, this work evaluated the influence of science instructors' engagement in dialogue and critical self-reflection on their teaching approaches and practices. Engagement in critical reflection was facilitated through watching of teaching videotapes followed by participants' engagement in dialogue about teaching with the researcher. Findings suggest that providing continuous post-workshop support by fostering engagement in critical self-reflection and dialogue, can lead to transformative learning about teaching. More specifically, participation in the program led to the transformation of teaching practices, while teaching approaches remained unchanged. While some obstacles to the transformation of teaching approaches were identified, major outcomes indicate that meaningful professional development can go far beyond learning how to use new teaching strategies through faculty engagement in critical reflection and dialogue on teaching.

The SAGE Handbook for Research in Education

The Role of Philosophy, JULIET A. BAXTER University of Oregon SHIRLEY J. MAGNUSSON California Polytechnic State University. E. ducational researchers have long grappled with how to improve the teaching and learning of science and ...

Author: Clifton F. Conrad

Publisher: SAGE Publications

ISBN: 9781412973359

Category: Education

Page: 624

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The SAGE Handbook for Research in Education: Engaging Ideas and Enriching Inquiry, edited by Clifton F. Conrad and Ronald C. Serlin, invites and stimulates students, faculty, and policymakers to become more self-reflective in their inquiry. Placing the pursuit of ideas at the epicenter of research, distinguished K–12 and higher education scholars advance myriad ideas for enhancing educational inquiry, relying extensively on narratives, vignettes, and examples of key episodes in inquiry. These exemplars illuminate past, present, and emerging approaches across fields and domains of inquiry to research in education.

Science in the City

This book links an exploration of contemporary research on urban science teaching to a more generative instructional approach in which students develop mastery by discussing science in culturally meaningful ways.

Author: Bryan A. Brown

Publisher: Harvard Education Press

ISBN: 9781682533789

Category: Education

Page: 192

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Science in the City examines how language and culture matter for effective science teaching. Author Bryan A. Brown argues that, given the realities of our multilingual and multicultural society, teachers must truly understand how issues of culture intersect with the fundamental principles of learning. This book links an exploration of contemporary research on urban science teaching to a more generative instructional approach in which students develop mastery by discussing science in culturally meaningful ways. The book starts with a trenchant analysis of the “black tax,” a double standard at work in science language and classrooms that forces students of color to appropriate and express their science knowledge solely in ways that accord with the dominant culture and knowledge regime. Because we are in an interactive, multimedia world, the author also posits the necessity of applying what is known about best practices in science teaching to best practices in technology. The book then turns to instruction, illustrating how science education can flourish if it is connected to students’ backgrounds, identities, language, and culture. In this empowered—and inclusive—form of science classroom, the role of narrative is key: educators use stories and anecdotes to induct students into the realm of scientific thinking; introduce big ideas in easy, familiar terms; and prioritize explanation over mastery of symbolic systems. The result is a classroom that showcases how the use of more familiar, culturally relevant modes of communication can pave the way for improved science learning.