Centennial History of the Carnegie Institution of Washington Volume 2 The Department of Terrestrial Magnetism

Centennial History of the Carnegie Institution of Washington Volume II The Department of Terrestrial Magnetism In 1902 , Andrew Carnegie founded the Carnegie Institution of Washington , to support innovative science research .

Author: Louis Brown

Publisher: Cambridge University Press

ISBN: 1139442392

Category: Science

Page:

View: 665

DOWNLOAD →

In 1902, Andrew Carnegie founded the Carnegie Institution of Washington, to support innovative science research. Since its creation two years later, the Department of Terrestrial Magnetism has undertaken a broad range of research from terrestrial magnetism, ionospheric physics and geochemistry to biophysics, radio astronomy and planetary science. This second volume in a series of five histories of the Carnegie Institution describes the people and events, the challenges and successes that the Department has witnessed over the last century. Contemporary photographs illustrate some of the remarkable expeditions and instruments developed in pursuit of scientific understanding, from sailing ships to nuclear particle accelerators and radio telescopes to mass spectrometers. These photographs show an evolution of scientific progress through the century, often done under trying, even exciting circumstances.

George Washington

On one of these occasions Washington is reported by Gouverneur Morris, in a eulogy delivered twelve years later, to have said: "It is too probable that no plan we propose will be adopted. Perhaps another dreadful conflict is to be ...

Author: Henry Cabot Lodge

Publisher: Litres

ISBN: 9785041356538

Category: Biography & Autobiography

Page:

View: 660

DOWNLOAD →

Laws of the State of New York

2 , 1042 Black River and St. Lawrence . 392 , 189 Black River and Woodhull vol . 2 , 1092 Boston and Albany 830 Brooklyn , extension of tracks in Atlantic Avenue..vol . 2 , 1102 Buffalo and Washington .. .vol . 2 , 1446 Buffalo and ...

Author: New York (State)

Publisher:

ISBN: IOWA:31858017076591

Category: Law

Page:

View: 705

DOWNLOAD →

Senate documents

2 . Beattie , J. A. , vol . 2 .. Bowie , Judge Harrison N. , vol . 1 Brown , Tom , vol . 2 ... Cain , Lawrence , vol . 2 . Canno J. C. , vol . 2 .. Carroll , Thomas P. , vol . 2 . ... Gary , Washington , vol . 2 .

Author:

Publisher:

ISBN: BSB:BSB11354498

Category:

Page: 1144

View: 179

DOWNLOAD →

Yearbook of the International Law Commission 2011 Vol II Part 3

... modification in question;346 if not, the ratification process is discontinued and the treaty does not enter into force.347 (11) The following conclusions may be drawn from this review: (Footnote 338 continued.) vol. 2, Washington ...

Author: International Law Commission

Publisher: United Nations

ISBN: 9789210581530

Category: Political Science

Page: 374

View: 422

DOWNLOAD →

The Yearbook contains the official records of the International Law Commission and is an indispensable tool for the preservation of the legislative history of the documents emanating from the Commission, as well as for the teaching, study, dissemination and wider appreciation of the efforts undertaken by the Commission in the progressive development of international law and its codification. Volume II (Part Three) reproduces the edited version of the annual report of the Commission to the General Assembly.

Washington Lessons in Leadership

2. Clarence Edwin Carter, ed., The Correspondence of General Thomas Gage, Vol. 2 (New Haven: Yale University Press, 1933), 686. 3. Samuel F. Batchelder, “The Washington Elm Tradition,” Cambridge Historical Proceedings for 1925, Vol.

Author: Gerald M. Carbone

Publisher: St. Martin's Press

ISBN: 0230104991

Category: Biography & Autobiography

Page: 224

View: 718

DOWNLOAD →

Before he became "the Father of our Country," George Washington was the Father of the American Army. He took an army that had no experience, no tradition, and no training, and fought a protracted war against the best, most disciplined force in the world—the British Army. Deftly handling the political realm, Washington convinced Congress to keep his army supplied—a difficult task when the country was really just a loose confederation of states with no power to tax. Washington influenced every phase of the Revolutionary war, from beginning to end. He left his mark with strategies and a vision of the Revolution as a war of attrition. His offenses were as brilliant as they were unpredictable, such as his legendary Christmas Day strike at Trenton, and a bold foray through the fog to nearly drive the British from the field at Germantown. It was an aggressive attack that helped convince the French that the American Army was worth supporting. In Washington, award-winning author Gerald M. Carbone argues that it is this sort of fearless but not reckless, spontaneous but calculated, offensive that Washington should be remembered for--as a leader not of infallibility but of greatness.

George Martha Washington

4 Freeman, Washington, Vol. 3, p. 6, n. 10. 5 PGWDE, GW to Sarah Cary Fairfax, 15 November 1757. 6 Sparks, Life of Washington, Vol. 2, p. 10. 7 Freeman, Washington, Vol. 1, pp. 198–9. 8 PGWDE, GW to JAW, 31 May 1754.

Author: Flora Fraser

Publisher: Bloomsbury Publishing

ISBN: 9781408835968

Category: Biography & Autobiography

Page: 464

View: 709

DOWNLOAD →

George and Martha Washington, of Mount Vernon, Virginia, were America's original first couple. From the 1750s, when young soldier George wooed and wedded Martha Dandridge Custis, a pretty and rich young widow, to the forging of a new nation, Flora Fraser traces the development, both personal and political, of an historic marriage. The private sphere – their love of home and country, the two children Martha brings to this union from a previous marriage, and the confidence she instilled in her beloved second spouse – forms the backdrop to an increasingly public partnership. The leading role played by Virginia in the resistance to British taxation galvanised the pair, radicalising their politics, and in 1775 George Washington was appointed commander-in-chief of the American 'rebels'. In the eight harsh years of the American War of Independence which followed, Martha's staunch support for her husband never wavered. But the eventual victory at Yorktown in 1781 and Washington's retirement which followed were overshadowed by the death of her son, Jacky. Interweaving the progress and reversals of war - the siege of icebound Boston, the loss of New York and the crossing of the Delaware - with George and Martha's private joys and sorrows, this is a mesmerizing rendering of two formidable characters. Flora Fraser's revealing account is the first scholarly portrait of a union which owed its strength in equal measure to both parties. in a narrative enhanced by a close reading of personal, military and presidential papers, Fraser brings George and Martha Washington to life afresh: he, a man who aspired to greatness; and she, a woman who, when tested, proved an ideal spouse to commander and president alike.

Documents Including Messages and Other Communications

Washington . 1 vol . 8 ° . Forty - Ninth Congress , Second Session . Senate Miscellaneous Documents . Vol . 3 . No. 30. Part 2 . Memoirs of the National Academy of Sciences . : Vol . 4 . Part 1st . Wazbiogtun . 1 vol . 8 ° .

Author: Ohio

Publisher:

ISBN: UOM:39015068554222

Category: Ohio

Page: 1464

View: 575

DOWNLOAD →

The Loyalist Conscience

The Writings of George Washington from the Original Manuscript Sources, 1745– 1799, vol. 2, ed. John Clement Fitzpatrick. Washington, D.C.: United States Government Printing Office, 1931. 31. Elizabeth Ellet.

Author: Chaim M. Rosenberg

Publisher: McFarland

ISBN: 9781476632483

Category: History

Page: 232

View: 939

DOWNLOAD →

Freedom of speech was restricted during the Revolutionary War. In the great struggle for independence, those who remained loyal to the British crown were persecuted with loss of employment, eviction from their homes, heavy taxation, confiscation of property and imprisonment. Loyalist Americans from all walks of life were branded as traitors and enemies of the people. By the end of the war, 80,000 had fled their homeland to face a dismal exile from which few would return, outcasts of a new republic based on democratic values of liberty, equality and justice.