Navy Force Structure and Shipbuilding Plans

Discusses the U.S. Navy¿s proposed FY 2010 budget requests funding for eight new Navy ships.

Author: Ronald O'Rourke

Publisher: DIANE Publishing

ISBN: 9781437919592

Category:

Page: 32

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Discusses the U.S. Navy¿s proposed FY 2010 budget requests funding for eight new Navy ships. This total includes two relatively expensive, high-capability combatant ships (a Virginia-class attack submarine and a DDG-51 class Aegis destroyer) and six relatively inexpensive ships (three Littoral Combat Ships [LCSs], two TAKE-1 auxiliary dry cargo ships, and one Joint High Speed Vessel [JHSV]). Concerns about the Navy¿s prospective ability to afford its long-range shipbuilding plan, combined with year-to-year changes in Navy shipbuilding plans and significant cost growth and other problems in building certain new Navy ships, have led to concerns about the status of Navy shipbuilding and the potential future size and capabilities of the fleet. Illus.

U S Navy Shipbuilding Plans

This book provides background information and presents potential issues for Congress concerning the Navy's ship force-structure goals and shipbuilding plans.

Author: Brandon Carmichael

Publisher: Nova Novinka

ISBN: 1621006948

Category: Transportation

Page: 100

View: 746

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This book provides background information and presents potential issues for Congress concerning the Navy's ship force-structure goals and shipbuilding plans. The planned size of the Navy, the rate of Navy ship procurement, and the prospective affordability of the Navy's shipbuilding plans have been matters of concern for the congressional defence committees for the past several years. Decisions that Congress makes on Navy shipbuilding programs can substantially affect Navy capabilities and funding requirements, and the U.S. shipbuilding industrial base.

Analysis of the Navy s Shipbuilding Plans

Charts and tables. This is a print on demand edition of an important, hard-to-find publication.

Author: Eric J. Labs

Publisher: DIANE Publishing

ISBN: 9781437982978

Category:

Page: 31

View: 692

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Statement of Eric J. Labs on the Navy¿s plans for its shipbuilding programs and corresponding budget. Contents: (1) Changes in Ship Requirements Under the 2011 Plan; (2) Ship Purchases and Inventories Under the 2011 Plan: Combat Ships; Logistics and Support Ships; (3) Ship Costs Under the 2011 Plan: The Navy¿s Estimates; CBO¿s Estimates; Changes from the 2009 Plan; (4) Outlook for Individual Ship Programs; Aircraft Carriers; Submarines; Large Surface Combatants; Littoral Combat Ships; Amphibious Ships. Charts and tables. This is a print on demand edition of an important, hard-to-find publication.

U S Navy Shipbuilding

This book provides background information and presents potential issues for Congress concerning the Navy's ship force-structure goals and shipbuilding plans.

Author: Gladys Clemens

Publisher:

ISBN: 1631171135

Category: History

Page: 187

View: 458

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This book provides background information and presents potential issues for Congress concerning the Navy's ship force-structure goals and shipbuilding plans. It also discusses, among other issues, quality problems in constructing recently delivered ships and Navy actions to improve quality and key practices employed by leading commercial ship buyers and shipbuilders to ensure quality and how these compared with Navy practices. (Imprint: Nova)

Navy Force Structure and Shipbuilding Plans Background and Issues for Congress

The issue for Congress that is discussed in this report is how to respond to the Navy's proposed force structure and shipbuilding plans.

Author: Ronald O'Rourke

Publisher:

ISBN: OCLC:264873644

Category: Cruisers (Warships)

Page: 29

View: 508

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In February 2008, as part of its proposed FY2009 budget, the Navy submitted to Congress the FY2009 version of its annual 30-year shipbuilding plan. The 30-year plan is intended to support the Navy's goal of achieving and maintaining a 313-ship fleet. The Navy first presented the 313-ship plan to Congress in February 2006. The increase in the Navy's estimated cost for implementing the plan is so large that the Navy no longer appears to have a clearly identifiable, announced strategy for generating the funds needed to implement the 30-year plan, at least not without significantly reducing funding for other Navy programs or increasing the Navy's programmed budget in coming years by billions of dollars per year. Concerns about the Navy's prospective ability to afford the 30-year shipbuilding plan, combined with year-to-year changes in Navy shipbuilding plans and significant cost growth and other problems in building certain new Navy ships, have led to strong concerns among some Members about the status of Navy shipbuilding and the potential future size and capabilities of the fleet. As a consequence of these strong concerns, some Members in hearings this year on the Navy's proposed FY2009 budget have strongly criticized aspects of the Navy's shipbuilding plan and indicated that they are considering making changes to the plan. Some Members in the House, for example, have indicated that they are considering the option of not procuring a third DDG-1000 class destroyer in FY2009, as the Navy has requested, and using the funding programmed for that ship to instead procure other kinds of ships for the Navy. This report will be updated as events warrant.

Warship Builders

Throughout the book, comparative analyses reveal differences and similarities in American, British, Japanese, and German naval construction.

Author: Thomas Heinrich

Publisher: Naval Institute Press

ISBN: 9781682475539

Category: History

Page: 360

View: 697

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Warship Builders is the first scholarly study of the U.S. naval shipbuilding industry from the early 1920s to the end of World War II, when American shipyards produced the world’s largest fleet that helped defeat the Axis powers in all corners of the globe. A colossal endeavor that absorbed billions and employed virtual armies of skilled workers, naval construction mobilized the nation’s leading industrial enterprises in the shipbuilding, engineering, and steel industries to deliver warships whose technical complexity dwarfed that of any other weapons platform. Based on systematic comparisons with British, Japanese, and German naval construction, Thomas Heinrich pinpoints the distinct features of American shipbuilding methods, technology development, and management practices that enabled U.S. yards to vastly outproduce their foreign counterparts. Throughout the book, comparative analyses reveal differences and similarities in American, British, Japanese, and German naval construction. Heinrich shows that U.S. and German shipyards introduced electric arc welding and prefabrication methods to a far greater extent than their British and Japanese counterparts between the wars, laying the groundwork for their impressive production records in World War II. While the American and Japanese navies relied heavily on government-owned navy yards, the British and German navies had most of their combatants built in corporately-owned yards, contradicting the widespread notion that only U.S. industrial mobilization depended on private enterprise. Lastly, the U.S. government’s investments into shipbuilding facilities in both private and government-owned shipyards dwarfed the sums British, Japanese, and German counterparts expended. This enabled American builders to deliver a vast fleet that played a pivotal role in global naval combat. ​

Long Term Outlook for the U S Navy s Fleet

Discusses the challenges that the Navy is facing in its plans for building its future fleet.

Author: Eric J. Labs

Publisher: DIANE Publishing

ISBN: 9781437928228

Category:

Page: 19

View: 810

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Discusses the challenges that the Navy is facing in its plans for building its future fleet. This testimony examined these matters: (1) the Navy¿s draft shipbuilding plan for fiscal year 2011; (2) the effect that replacing Ohio class submarines with a new class of submarines will have on the Navy¿s shipbuilding program; and (3) the number of ships that may be needed to support ballistic missile defense from the sea. Before discussing those issues, the author briefly recaps an analysis of the 2009 shipbuilding plan as a point of departure for examining the draft 2011 plan. Charts and tables.

2017 U S Navy Force Structure Assessment FSA and the Request for a 355 Ship Navy Outline of Shipbuilding Plans for Aircraft Carriers Submarines Nuclear Missiles Surface Combatants Destroyers

This FSA assumes that the future plans for our Navy, in ship types and numbers of ships, continues to replace the ships we have today with ships of similar capability and in similar numbers as we transition to the future Navy - it does not ...

Author: U. S. Military

Publisher:

ISBN: 1549603698

Category:

Page: 132

View: 382

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Navy's Force Structure Assessment (FSA) was developed in an effort to determine the right balance of existing forces, the ships we currently have under construction and the future procurement plans needed to address the ever-evolving and increasingly complex threats the Navy is required to counter in the global maritime commons. This FSA assumes that the future plans for our Navy, in ship types and numbers of ships, continues to replace the ships we have today with ships of similar capability and in similar numbers as we transition to the future Navy - it does not address potential options that may come out of the ongoing review of the potential Future Fleet Architecture studies that were directed by Congress and completed in October 2016. As we evaluate the options presented in these studies and move to include them in our plans for tomorrow's Navy, this FSA will need to be updated to reflect those changes that are determined to be most beneficial to meeting the Navy's missions of the future. The FSA, released at the end of 2016 by the outgoing Obama administration, recommends a 355-ship fleet including 12 carriers, 104 large surface combatants, 52 small surface combatants, 38 amphibious ships, and 66 submarines. The assessment will be one input to the Navy's FY-2018 30-year shipbuilding plan. The current proposed Navy budget is seen as a bridge to this larger Navy, with shipbuilding on an upward glide slope towards 308 ships. Navy leadership is confident that, if funded, this plan is executable, as each ship class called for in the FSA has an active shipbuilding line already up and running. "To continue to protect America and defend our strategic interests around the world, all while continuing the counter terrorism fight and appropriately competing with a growing China and resurgent Russia, our Navy must continue to grow," said Secretary of the Navy Ray Mabus. "All of the analysis done to date, inside and outside of the Navy, recognizes, as we have for nearly the last eight years, the need for a larger Fleet. That is why, working with Congress and our partners in industry, we have successfully reversed the decline in shipbuilding that occurred from 2001-2009, putting 86 ships under contract over the last seven years. Maintaining this momentum, and the cost-saving business practices we have established, will be critical to ensuring the Navy is able to achieve the FSA-recommended fleet size and is positioned to maintain the global presence the Navy and Marine Corps uniquely provide our nation." Part of this reproduction includes the Congressional Research Service report on the FSA and shipbuilding. This report presents background information and issues for Congress concerning the Navy's force structure and shipbuilding plans. The current and planned size and composition of the Navy, the rate of Navy ship procurement, and the prospective affordability of the Navy's shipbuilding plans have been oversight matters for the congressional defense committees for many years. The Navy's proposed FY2018 budget, as amended on May 24, 2017, requests the procurement of nine new ships, including one Gerald R. Ford (CVN-78) class aircraft carrier, two Virginia-class attack submarines, two DDG-51 class destroyers, two Littoral Combat Ships (LCSs), one TAO-205 class oiler, and one towing, salvage, and rescue ship. On December 15, 2016, the Navy released a new force-structure goal that calls for achieving and maintaining a fleet of 355 ships of certain types and numbers. The issue for Congress is whether to approve, reject, or modify the Navy's force structure and shipbuilding plans. Decisions that Congress makes on this issue can substantially affect Navy capabilities and funding requirements, and the U.S. shipbuilding industrial base.