Until Darwin Science Human Variety and the Origins of Race

This work fills a gap in recent studies on the history of race and science.

Author: B Ricardo Brown

Publisher: Routledge

ISBN: 9781317323228

Category: History

Page: 227

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This work fills a gap in recent studies on the history of race and science. Focusing on both the classification systems of human variety and the development of science as the arbiter of truth, Brown looks at the rise of the emerging sciences of life and society – biology and sociology – as well as the debate surrounding slavery and abolition.

Until Darwin Science Human Variety and the Origins of Race

Such investigation led them to proclaim the polygenic origins of human variety. This chapter gives a general discussion of the American School and an account of the brief period before Darwin when polygenism was the predominant ...

Author: B Ricardo Brown

Publisher: Routledge

ISBN: 9781317323235

Category: Science

Page: 224

View: 659

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This work fills a gap in recent studies on the history of race and science. Focusing on both the classification systems of human variety and the development of science as the arbiter of truth, Brown looks at the rise of the emerging sciences of life and society – biology and sociology – as well as the debate surrounding slavery and abolition.

Race Nation History

There is a vast debate on Darwin's influence on the emerging racial discourse and on slavery, which he ardently opposed. See, for instance, B. Ricardo Brown, Until Darwin: Science, Human Variety and the Origins of Race (London: ...

Author: Oded Y. Steinberg

Publisher: University of Pennsylvania Press

ISBN: 9780812296235

Category: History

Page: 280

View: 836

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In Race, Nation, History, Oded Y. Steinberg examines the way a series of nineteenth-century scholars in England and Germany first constructed and then questioned the periodization of history into ancient, medieval, and modern eras, shaping the way we continue to think about the past and present of Western civilization at a fundamental level. Steinberg explores this topic by tracing the deep connections between the idea of epochal periodization and concepts of race and nation that were prevalent at the time—especially the role that Germanic or Teutonic tribes were assumed to play in the unfolding of Western history. Steinberg shows how English scholars such as Thomas Arnold, Williams Stubbs, and John Richard Green; and German scholars such as Christian Karl Josias von Bunsen, Max Müller, and Reinhold Pauli built on the notion of a shared Teutonic kinship to establish a correlation between the division of time and the ascent or descent of races or nations. For example, although they viewed the Germanic tribes' conquest of the Roman Empire in A.D. 476 as a formative event that symbolized the transformation from antiquity to the Middle Ages, they did so by highlighting the injection of a new and dominant ethnoracial character into the decaying empire. But they also rejected the idea that the fifth century A.D. was the most decisive era in historical periodization, advocating instead for a historical continuity that emphasized the significance of the Germanic tribes' influence on the making of the nations of modern Europe. Concluding with character studies of E. A. Freeman, James Bryce, and J. B. Bury, Steinberg demonstrates the ways in which the innovative schemes devised by this community of Victorian historians for the division of historical time relied on the cornerstone of race.

Military Medicine and the Making of Race

In November 1859 Charles Darwin published his long-awaited On the Origin of Species. ... 1976), 3, 31; B. Riccardo Brown, Until Darwin, Science, Human Variety and the Origins of Race (London: Pickering and Chatto, 2010), 99.

Author: Tim Lockley

Publisher: Cambridge University Press

ISBN: 9781108495622

Category: Biography & Autobiography

Page: 223

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Demonstrates how Britain's black soldiers helped shape the very idea of race in the nineteenth century Atlantic world.

Theologically Engaged Anthropology

... Darwin's Sacred Cause: How a Hatred of Slavery Shaped Darwin's Views on Human Evolution (Boston: Houghton Mifflin Harcourt, 2009); B. Ricardo Brown, Until Darwin: Science, Human Variety and the Origins of Race (London: Pickering ...

Author: J. Derrick Lemons

Publisher: Oxford University Press

ISBN: 9780192518750

Category: Religion

Page: 432

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After years of discussion within the field of anthropology concerning how to properly engage with theology, a growing number of anthropologists now want to engage with theology as a counterpart in ethnographic dialogue. Theologically Engaged Anthropology focuses on the theological history of anthropology, illuminating deeply held theological assumptions that humans make about the nature of reality, and illustrating how these theological assumptions manifest themselves in society. This volume brings together leading anthropologists and theologians to consider what theology can contribute to cultural anthropology and ethnography. It provides anthropologists and theologians with a rationale and framework for using theology in anthropological research.

Race Science and the Nation

Brown, B. R. (2010) Until Darwin: Science, Human Variety and the Origins of Race, London: Pickering & Chatto. Bunzl, M. (1996) 'Franz Boas and the Humboldtian Tradition: From Volksgeist and Nationalcharakter to an Anthropological ...

Author: Chris Manias

Publisher: Routledge

ISBN: 9781135054700

Category: History

Page: 302

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Across the nineteenth century, scholars in Britain, France and the German lands sought to understand their earliest ancestors: the Germanic and Celtic tribes known from classical antiquity, and the newly discovered peoples of prehistory. New fields – philology, archeology and anthropology – interacted, breaking down languages, unearthing artifacts, measuring skulls and recording the customs of "savage" analogues. This was a decidedly national process: disciplines institutionalized on national levels, and their findings seen to have deep implications for the origins of the nation and its "racial composition." However, this operated within broader currents. The wide spread of material and novelty of the methods meant that these approaches formed connections across Europe and beyond, even while national rivalries threatened to tear these networks apart. Race, Science and the Nation follows this tension, offering a simultaneously comparative, cross-national and multi-disciplinary history of the scholarly reconstruction of European prehistory. As well as showing how interaction between disciplines was key to their formation, it makes arguments of keen relevance to studies of racial thought and nationalism. It shows these researches often worked against attempts to present the chaotic multi-layered ancient eras as times of mythic origin. Instead, they argued that the modern nations of Europe were not only diverse, but were products of long processes of social development and "racial" fusion. This book therefore brings to light a formerly unstudied motif of nineteenth-century national consciousness, showing how intellectuals in the era of nation-building themselves drove an idea of their nations being "constructed" from a useable past.

Writing the History of the Humanities

B. Ricardo Brown , Until Darwin, Science, Human Variety and the Origins of Race ( London : Pickering & Chatto , 2010 ) . 38. Franz Boas and Immigration Commission , Changes in Bodily Form of Descendants of Immigrants ( Washington ...

Author: Herman Paul

Publisher: Bloomsbury Publishing

ISBN: 9781350199071

Category: History

Page: 393

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What are the humanities? As the cluster of disciplines historically grouped together as “humanities” has grown and diversified to include media studies and digital studies alongside philosophy, art history and musicology to name a few, the need to clearly define the field is pertinent. Herman Paul leads a stellar line-up of esteemed and early-career scholars to provide an overview of the themes, questions and methods that are central to current research on the history of the nineteenth- and twentieth-century humanities. This exciting addition to the successful Writing History series will draw from a wide range of case-studies from diverse fields, as classical philology, art history, and Biblical studies, to provide a state-of-the-art overview of the field. In doing so, this ground-breaking book challenges the rigid distinctions between disciplines and show the variety of prisms through which historians of the humanities study the past.

After Darwin

His works include “Darwin, Slavery, and Science” (2010) and Until Darwin: Science, Human Variety, and the Origins of Race (2010). Miranda Butler is an assistant professor of English at Snow College. She regularly speaks, writes, ...

Author: Devin Griffiths

Publisher: Cambridge University Press

ISBN: 9781009184885

Category: Literary Criticism

Page: 275

View: 99

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Creative storytelling is the beating heart of Darwin's science. All of Darwin's writings drew on information gleaned from a worldwide network of scientific research and correspondence, but they hinge on moments in which Darwin asks his reader to imagine how specific patterns came to be over time, spinning yarns filled with protagonists and antagonists, crises, triumphs, and tragedies. His fictions also forged striking new possibilities for the interpretation of human societies and their relation to natural environments. This volume gathers an international roster of scholars to ask what Darwin's writing offers future of literary scholarship and critical theory, as well as allied fields like history, art history, philosophy, gender studies, disability studies, the history of race, aesthetics, and ethics. It speaks to anyone interested in the impact of Darwin on the humanities, including literary scholars, undergraduate and graduate students, and general readers interested in Darwin's continuing influence.

The Fate of Anatomical Collections

44 See for example Douglas and Ballard, Foreign Bodies; and Emmanuel Chukwudi Eze, ed., Race and the Enlightenment: A Reader, Cambridge, MA: Blackwell, 1997. 45 B. Ricardo Brown, Until Darwin, Science, Human Variety and the Origins of ...

Author: Rina Knoeff

Publisher: Routledge

ISBN: 9781317031932

Category: History

Page: 336

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Almost every medical faculty possesses anatomical and/or pathological collections: human and animal preparations, wax- and other models, as well as drawings, photographs, documents and archives relating to them. In many institutions these collections are well-preserved, but in others they are poorly maintained and rendered inaccessible to medical and other audiences. This volume explores the changing status of anatomical collections from the early modern period to date. It is argued that anatomical and pathological collections are medically relevant not only for future generations of medical faculty and future research, but they are also important in the history of medicine, the history of the institutions to which they belong, and to the wider understanding of the cultural history of the body. Moreover, anatomical collections are crucial to new scholarly inter-disciplinary studies that investigate the interaction between arts and sciences, especially medicine, and offer a venue for the study of interactions between anatomists, scientists, anatomical artists and other groups, as well as the display and presentation of natural history and medical cabinets. In considering the fate of anatomical collections - and the importance of the keeper’s decisions with respect to collections - this volume will make an important methodological contribution to the study of collections and to discussions on how to preserve universities’ academic heritage.

Historicizing Humans

Deep Time, Evolution, and Race in Nineteenth-Century British Sciences Efram Sera-Shriar ... 68–71; B. Ricardo Brown, Until Darwin, Science, Human Variety and the Origins of Race (London: Pickering and Chatto, 2010), 89–98, 252–77. 66.

Author: Efram Sera-Shriar

Publisher: University of Pittsburgh Press

ISBN: 9780822986072

Category: Science

Page: 320

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With an Afterword by Theodore Koditschek A number of important developments and discoveries across the British Empire's imperial landscape during the nineteenth century invited new questions about human ancestry. The rise of secularism and scientific naturalism; new evidence, such as skeletal and archaeological remains; and European encounters with different people all over the world challenged the existing harmony between science and religion and threatened traditional biblical ideas about special creation and the timeline of human history. Advances in print culture and voyages of exploration also provided researchers with a wealth of material that contributed to their investigations into humanity’s past. Historicizing Humans takes a critical approach to nineteenth-century human history, as the contributors consider how these histories were shaped by the colonial world, and for various scientific, religious, and sociopolitical purposes. This volume highlights the underlying questions and shared assumptions that emerged as various human developmental theories competed for dominance throughout the British Empire.