The Way of the Cell

A leading microbiologist provides thought-provoking insights into the question of "What is Life?" as he examines the relationship of living things to the inorganic realms of physics and chemistry, explains how lifeless chemicals come ...

Author: Franklin M. Harold

Publisher: Oxford University Press, USA

ISBN: 9780195163384

Category: Science

Page: 305

View: 785

DOWNLOAD →

A leading microbiologist provides thought-provoking insights into the question of "What is Life?" as he examines the relationship of living things to the inorganic realms of physics and chemistry, explains how lifeless chemicals come together to form living beings, and details the true complexity of seemingly simple microorganisms such as E. coli.

In Search of Cell History

Written in accessible language and complemented by a glossary for easy reference, this book examines the relationship between cells and genes; the central role of bioenergetics in the origin of life; the status of the universal tree of life ...

Author: Franklin M. Harold

Publisher: University of Chicago Press

ISBN: 9780226174310

Category: Science

Page: 318

View: 540

DOWNLOAD →

This comprehensive history of cell evolution “deftly discusses the definition of life” as well as cellular organization, classification and more (San Francisco Book Review). The origin of cells remains one of the most fundamental mysteries in biology, one that has spawned a large body of research and debate over the past two decades. With In Search of Cell History, Franklin M. Harold offers a comprehensive, impartial take on that research and the controversies that keep the field in turmoil. Written in accessible language and complemented by a glossary for easy reference, this book examines the relationship between cells and genes; the central role of bioenergetics in the origin of life; the status of the universal tree of life with its three stems and viral outliers; and the controversies surrounding the last universal common ancestor. Harold also discusses the evolution of cellular organization, the origin of complex cells, and the incorporation of symbiotic organelles. In Search of Cell History shows us just how far we have come in understanding cell evolution—and the evolution of life in general—and how far we still have to go. “Wonderful…A loving distillation of connections within the incredible diversity of life in the biosphere, framing one of biology’s most important remaining questions: how did life begin?”—Nature

Meaningful Information

4Proteomics is the study of the structure and function of proteins as vital constituents of living organisms. ... Oxford University Press, New York Harold FM (2001) The Way of the Cell: Molecules, Organisms and the Order of Life.

Author: Anthony Reading

Publisher: Springer Science & Business Media

ISBN: 9781461401582

Category: Science

Page: 158

View: 424

DOWNLOAD →

The book introduces a radically new way of thinking about information and the important role it plays in living systems. It opens up new avenues for exploring how cells and organisms change and adapt, since the ability to detect and respond to meaningful information is the key that enables them to receive their genetic heritage, regulate their internal milieu, and respond to changes in their environment. It also provides a way of resolving Descartes’ dilemma by explaining the workings of the brain in non-mechanical terms that are not tainted by spiritual or metaphysical beliefs. The types of meaningful information that different species and different cell types are able to detect are finely matched to the ecosystem in which they live, for natural selection has shaped what they need to know to function effectively in those circumstances. Biological detection and response systems range from the chemical configurations that govern genes and cell life to the relatively simple tropisms that guide single-cell organisms, the rudimentary nervous systems of invertebrates, and the complex neuronal structures of mammals and primates. The scope of meaningful information that can be detected and responded to reaches its peak in our own species, as exemplified by our special abilities in language, cognition, emotion, and consciousness, all of which are explored within this new framework.

Life s Ratchet

How Molecular Machines Extract Order from Chaos Peter M Hoffmann ... Harold, Franklin M. The Way of the Cell: Molecules, Organisms, and the Order of Life. New York: Oxford University Press, 2003. A very readable, popular introduction to ...

Author: Peter M Hoffmann

Publisher: Hachette UK

ISBN: 9780465033362

Category: Science

Page: 288

View: 190

DOWNLOAD →

Life is an enduring mystery. Yet, science tells us that living beings are merely sophisticated structures of lifeless molecules. If this view is correct, where do the seemingly purposeful motions of cells and organisms originate? In Life's Ratchet, physicist Peter M. Hoffmann locates the answer to this age-old question at the nanoscale. Below the calm, ordered exterior of a living organism lies microscopic chaos, or what Hoffmann calls the molecular storm -- specialized molecules immersed in a whirlwind of colliding water molecules. Our cells are filled with molecular machines, which, like tiny ratchets, transform random motion into ordered activity, and create the "purpose" that is the hallmark of life. Tiny electrical motors turn electrical voltage into motion, nanoscale factories custom-build other molecular machines, and mechanical machines twist, untwist, separate and package strands of DNA. The cell is like a city -- an unfathomable, complex collection of molecular workers working together to create something greater than themselves. Life, Hoffman argues, emerges from the random motions of atoms filtered through these sophisticated structures of our evolved machinery. We are agglomerations of interacting nanoscale machines more amazing than anything in science fiction. Rather than relying on some mysterious "life force" to drive them -- as people believed for centuries -- life's ratchets harness instead the second law of thermodynamics and the disorder of the molecular storm. Grounded in Hoffmann's own cutting-edge research, Life's Ratchet reveals the incredible findings of modern nanotechnology to tell the story of how the noisy world of atoms gives rise to life itself.

Mechanical Integration of Plant Cells and Plants

Harold FM (2001) The way of the cell. Molecules, organisms and the order of life. Oxford University Press, Oxford, New York Kant I (1786) Metaphysische Anfangsgru ̈nde der Naturwissenschaft (Metaphysical Foundations of Natural Science) ...

Author: Przemyslaw Wojtaszek

Publisher: Springer Science & Business Media

ISBN: 9783642190919

Category: Science

Page: 352

View: 861

DOWNLOAD →

Chemical reactions and interactions between molecules are commonly considered the basis of life, and thus the biochemical nature of cells and organisms is relatively well recognized. Research conducted in recent years, however, increasingly indicates that physical forces profoundly affect the functioning of life at all levels of its organization. To detect and to respond to such forces, plant cells and plants need to be structured mechanically. This volume focuses on mechanical aspects of plant life. It starts with a consideration of the mechanical integration of supracellular structures and mechanical properties of cellular building blocks to show how the structural integrity of plant cells is achieved and maintained during growth and development. The following chapters reveal how the functioning of integrated plant cells contributes to the mechanical integration of plants, and how the latter are able to detect physical stimuli and to reorganize their own cells in response to them. The mechanical aspects of plant responses to stresses are also presented. Finally, all these aspects are placed in an evolutionary context.

On Life

The way of the cell: molecules, organisms and the order of life. New York, Oxford University Press. Harold, F. M. 2002. Force and compliance: rethinking morphogenesis in walled cells. Fungal Genetics and Biology 37: 271–282.

Author: Franklin M. Harold

Publisher: Oxford University Press

ISBN: 9780197604540

Category: Science

Page: 224

View: 619

DOWNLOAD →

Franklin M. Harold's On Life reveals what science can tell us about the living world. All creatures, from bacteria and redwoods to garden snails and humans, belong to a single biochemical family. We all operate by the same principles and are all made up of cells, either one or many. We flaunt capacities that far exceed those of inanimate matter, yet we stand squarely within the material world. So what is life, anyway? How do living things function, and how did they come into existence? Questions like these have baffled philosophers and scientists since antiquity, but over the past half-century answers have begun to emerge. Offering an inside look, Franklin M. Harold makes life accessible to readers interested in the biological big picture. The book traces how living things operate, focusing on the interplay of biology with physics and chemistry. He asserts that biology stands apart from the physical sciences because life revolves around organization-- that is, purposeful order. On Life aims to make life intelligible by giving readers an understanding of the biological landscape; it sketches the principles as biologists presently understand them and highlights major unresolved issues. What emerges is a biology bracketed by two stubborn mysteries: the nature of the mind and the origin of life. This portrait of biology is comprehensible but inescapably complex, internally consistent, and buttressed by a wealth of factual knowledge.

The Web of Meaning

John M. Archibald, 'Lynn Margulis (1938–2011)', Current Biology 22:1, 2012, R4–R6; Zimmer, 'Origin of Eukaryotes'; Franklin M. Harold, The Way of the Cell: Molecules, Organisms and the Order of Life, New York: Oxford University Press, ...

Author: Jeremy Lent

Publisher: Profile Books

ISBN: 9781782837251

Category: Philosophy

Page:

View: 313

DOWNLOAD →

'The Web of Meaning is both a profound personal meditation on human existence and a tour-de-force weaving together of historic and contemporary world-wide secular and spiritual thought on the deepest question of all: why are we here?' Gabor Maté M.D., author, In The Realm of Hungry Ghosts: Close Encounters With Addiction 'We need, now more than ever, to figure out how to make all kinds of connections. This book can help--and therefore it can help with a lot of the urgent tasks we face.' Bill McKibben, author, Falter: Has the Human Game Begun to Play Itself Out? As our civilization careens towards a precipice of climate breakdown, ecological destruction and gaping inequality, people are losing their existential moorings. Our dominant worldview of disconnection, which tells us we are split between mind and body, separate from each other, and at odds with the natural world, has passed its expiration date. Yet another world is possible. Award-winning author, Jeremy Lent, investigates humanity's age-old questions - who am I? why am I? how should I live? - from a fresh perspective, weaving together findings from modern systems thinking, evolutionary biology and cognitive neuroscience with insights from Buddhism, Taoism and indigenous wisdom. The result is a breathtaking accomplishment: a rich, coherent worldview based on a deep recognition of connectedness within ourselves, between each other, and with the entire natural world.

Biological Information New Perspectives Proceedings Of The Symposium

As Franklin Harold summarizes the situation in The Way of the Cell : Molecules , Organisms , and the Order of Life ( 2001 : 232 ) , “ living organisms are autopoietic systems : self - constructing , self - maintaining , energy ...

Author: John C Sanford

Publisher: World Scientific

ISBN: 9789814508735

Category: Computers

Page: 584

View: 883

DOWNLOAD →

In the spring of 2011, a diverse group of scientists gathered at Cornell University to discuss their research into the nature and origin of biological information. This symposium brought together experts in information theory, computer science, numerical simulation, thermodynamics, evolutionary theory, whole organism biology, developmental biology, molecular biology, genetics, physics, biophysics, mathematics, and linguistics. This volume presents new research by those invited to speak at the conference.The contributors to this volume use their wide-ranging expertise in the area of biological information to bring fresh insights into the many explanatory difficulties associated with biological information. These authors raise major challenges to the conventional scientific wisdom, which attempts to explain all biological information exclusively in terms of the standard mutation/selection paradigm.Several clear themes emerged from these research papers: 1) Information is indispensable to our understanding of what life is; 2) Biological information is more than the material structures that embody it; 3) Conventional chemical and evolutionary mechanisms seem insufficient to fully explain the labyrinth of information that is life. By exploring new perspectives on biological information, this volume seeks to expand, encourage, and enrich research into the nature and origin of biological information.

Biological Information

As Franklin Harold summarizes the situation in The Way of the Cell: Molecules, Organisms, and the Order of Life (2001: 232), “living organisms are autopoietic systems: self-constructing, self-maintaining, energy transducing ...

Author: Robert J Marks II

Publisher: World Scientific Publishing Company

ISBN: 9789814508728

Category: Computers

Page: 584

View: 817

DOWNLOAD →

In the spring of 2011, a diverse group of scientists gathered at Cornell University to discuss their research into the nature and origin of biological information. This symposium brought together experts in information theory, computer science, numerical simulation, thermodynamics, evolutionary theory, whole organism biology, developmental biology, molecular biology, genetics, physics, biophysics, mathematics, and linguistics. This volume presents new research by those invited to speak at the conference. The contributors to this volume use their wide-ranging expertise in the area of biological information to bring fresh insights into the many explanatory difficulties associated with biological information. These authors raise major challenges to the conventional scientific wisdom, which attempts to explain all biological information exclusively in terms of the standard mutation/selection paradigm. Several clear themes emerged from these research papers: 1) Information is indispensable to our understanding of what life is; 2) Biological information is more than the material structures that embody it; 3) Conventional chemical and evolutionary mechanisms seem insufficient to fully explain the labyrinth of information that is life. By exploring new perspectives on biological information, this volume seeks to expand, encourage, and enrich research into the nature and origin of biological information.

To Make the World Intelligible

John Maynard Smith, The Problems of Life (1986); and of course, Franklin M. Harold, The Way of the CellMolecules, Organisms and the Order of Life (2001). Monod and Beck are quoted from the books listed above.

Author: Franklin M. Harold

Publisher: FriesenPress

ISBN: 9781525500206

Category: Biography & Autobiography

Page: 198

View: 630

DOWNLOAD →

To Make the World Intelligible: A Scientist’s Journey is both a book about a life of science and about the science of life. In it, Franklin M. Harold shares the story of his life as a German immigrant, who lived in the Middle East before coming to America and finding his place in life as a scientist. But Harold’s story does not stand in isolation. It is set against the heyday of biochemistry and molecular biology: a time when the staid science of biology was being transformed from a descriptive study of animals and plants into an intense inquiry into how living things work at the level of cells and molecules. Harold then builds on this backdrop by sharing some of his research and that of his mentor and Nobel Prizewinner Peter Mitchell, as well as his insights and reflections on life as a phenomenon of nature. The accessible, comprehensive, and yet lyrical way that Harold accomplishes this is a testament to his belief that a scientist’s raison d’être is to make the world intelligible.