The Rise of the Meritocracy

What drives the book is Young's having identified one of the fundamental paradoxes of what we would call liberalism and the British would call socialism: the liberal dream of equal opportunity." --Nicholas Lemann, The Atlantic Monthly

Author: Michael Dunlop Young

Publisher: Transaction Publishers

ISBN: 9781560007043

Category: Education

Page: 200

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Michael Young has christened the oligarchy of the future “Meritocracy.” Indeed, the word is now part of the English language. It would appear that the formula: IQ+Effort=Merit may well constitute the basic belief of the ruling class in the twenty-first century. Projecting himself into the year 2034, the author of this sociological satire shows how present decisions and practices may remold our society. It is widespread knowledge that it is insufficient to be somebody's nephew to obtain a responsible post in business, government, teaching, or science. Experts in education and selection apply scientific principles to sift out the leaders of tomorrow. You need intelligence rating, qualification, experience, application, and a certain caliber to achieve status. In a word, one must show merit to advance in the new society of tomorrow. In a new opening essay, Young reflects on the reception of his work, and its production, in a candid and lively way. Many of the critical ambiguities surrounding its original publication are now clarified and resolved. What we have is what the Guardian of London called “A brilliant essay.” and what Time and Tide described as “a fountain gush of new ideas. Its wit and style make it compulsively enjoyable reading from cover to cover.” "Has the thrill of immediate relevance. . .its thinking is consistently rich and fascinating. Young is onto a big theme, involving fundamental questions about social organization and individual dignity. What drives the book is Young's having identified one of the fundamental paradoxes of what we would call liberalism and the British would call socialism: the liberal dream of equal opportunity." --Nicholas Lemann, The Atlantic Monthly

The Rise of the Meritocracy

Practically and ethically, a meritocratic education underpins a meritocratic society. ... is a meritocracy. Differential status and differential income are based on technical skills and higher education, and xiv THE RISE OF MERITOCRACY.

Author: Michael Young

Publisher: Transaction Publishers

ISBN: 9781412815727

Category: Social Science

Page: 180

View: 144

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Michael Young has christened the oligarchy of the future “Meritocracy.” Indeed, the word is now part of the English language. It would appear that the formula: IQ+Effort=Merit may well constitute the basic belief of the ruling class in the twenty-first century. Projecting himself into the year 2034, the author of this sociological satire shows how present decisions and practices may remold our society. It is widespread knowledge that it is insufficient to be somebody's nephew to obtain a responsible post in business, government, teaching, or science. Experts in education and selection apply scientific principles to sift out the leaders of tomorrow. You need intelligence rating, qualification, experience, application, and a certain caliber to achieve status. In a word, one must show merit to advance in the new society of tomorrow. In a new opening essay, Young reflects on the reception of his work, and its production, in a candid and lively way. Many of the critical ambiguities surrounding its original publication are now clarified and resolved. What we have is what the Guardian of London called “A brilliant essay.” and what Time and Tide described as “a fountain gush of new ideas. Its wit and style make it compulsively enjoyable reading from cover to cover.”

The Rise of the Meritocracy 1870 2033

A satire surveying the trends of present day British educational policy in the form of a fictional report from the year 2033.

Author: Michael Dunlop Young

Publisher: Penguin Group

ISBN: PSU:000020466152

Category: Education

Page: 198

View: 979

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A satire surveying the trends of present day British educational policy in the form of a fictional report from the year 2033.

The Rise of the Meritocracy

Michael Young has christened the oligarchy of the future Meritocracy

Author: Michael Young

Publisher: Routledge

ISBN: 1138538302

Category:

Page: 180

View: 682

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Michael Young has christened the oligarchy of the future "Meritocracy." Indeed, the word is now part of the English language. It would appear that the formula: IQ+Effort=Merit may well constitute the basic belief of the ruling class in the twenty-first century. Projecting himself into the year 2034, the author of this sociological satire shows how present decisions and practices may remold our society. It is widespread knowledge that it is insufficient to be somebody's nephew to obtain a responsible post in business, government, teaching, or science. Experts in education and selection apply scientific principles to sift out the leaders of tomorrow. You need intelligence rating, qualification, experience, application, and a certain caliber to achieve status. In a word, one must show merit to advance in the new society of tomorrow. In a new opening essay, Young reflects on the reception of his work, and its production, in a candid and lively way. Many of the critical ambiguities surrounding its original publication are now clarified and resolved. What we have is what the Guardian of London called "A brilliant essay." and what Time and Tide described as "a fountain gush of new ideas. Its wit and style make it compulsively enjoyable reading from cover to cover."

The Meritocracy Myth

The term meritocracy, coined by British sociologist Michael Young in his satirical novel The Rise of the Meritocracy, 1870–2033: An Essay on Education and Equality (1961), is closely linked with the idea of the American Dream.

Author: Stephen J. McNamee

Publisher: Rowman & Littlefield Publishers

ISBN: 9781442219830

Category: Social Science

Page: 266

View: 190

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This book challenges the widely held American belief in meritocracy—that people get out of the system what they put into it based on individual merit. Examining talent, attitude, work ethic, and character as elements of merit, the book also evaluates the effect of non-merit factors such as social status, race, heritage, and wealth on meritocracy. The third edition features a new section on “The Great Recession.”

Establishment and Meritocracy

Not until I finally read Michael Young's classic 1958 fusion of historical sociology, satire, futurology and prediction in The Rise of the Meritocracy, did I really inhale the fact that this was a warning – that Young was foreseeing ...

Author: Peter Hennessy

Publisher: Haus Publishing

ISBN: 9781908323781

Category: Political Science

Page: 96

View: 934

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Like so many of the postwar generation in Britain, Peter Hennessy climbed the ladders of opportunity set up by the 1944 Education Act designed to encourage a more meritocratic society. In this highly personal book, Hennessy examines the rise of meritocracy as a concept and the persistence of the shadowy notion of an establishment in Britain’s institutions of state. He asks whether these elusive concepts still have any power to explain British society, and why they continue to fascinate us. To what extent are the ideas of meritocracy and the establishment simply imagined? And if a meritocracy rose in the years following 1945, has it now stalled? With its penetrating examination of the British school system and postwar trends, Establishment and Meritocracy is an important resource for those concerned about the link between education and later success, both for individuals and their societies.

Against Meritocracy

As a key writer of the 1945 Labour Party manifesto Let Us Face the Future and Labour's director of research, Young wrote The Rise of the Meritocracy in part as a warning shot to his party against newly emergent forms of social division ...

Author: Jo Littler

Publisher: Routledge

ISBN: 9781317496038

Category: Social Science

Page: 250

View: 676

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Meritocracy today involves the idea that whatever your social position at birth, society ought to offer enough opportunity and mobility for ‘talent’ to combine with ‘effort’ in order to ‘rise to the top’. This idea is one of the most prevalent social and cultural tropes of our time, as palpable in the speeches of politicians as in popular culture. In this book Jo Littler argues that meritocracy is the key cultural means of legitimation for contemporary neoliberal culture – and that whilst it promises opportunity, it in fact creates new forms of social division. Against Meritocracy is split into two parts. Part I explores the genealogies of meritocracy within social theory, political discourse and working cultures. It traces the dramatic U-turn in meritocracy’s meaning, from socialist slur to a contemporary ideal of how a society should be organised. Part II uses a series of case studies to analyse the cultural pull of popular ‘parables of progress’, from reality TV to the super-rich and celebrity CEOs, from social media controversies to the rise of the ‘mumpreneur’. Paying special attention to the role of gender, ‘race’ and class, this book provides new conceptualisations of the meaning of meritocracy in contemporary culture and society.

The Meritocracy Trap

The Rise of the Meritocracy: Young, The Rise of the Meritocracy. even into the new millennium: Michael Young, “Comment: Down with Meritocracy,” Guardian, June 29, 2001, accessed September 28, 2018, ...

Author: Daniel Markovits

Publisher: Penguin UK

ISBN: 9780241289921

Category: Business & Economics

Page: 464

View: 516

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'This book flips your world upside down. Daniel Markovits argues that meritocracy isn't a virtuous, efficient system that rewards the best and brightest. Instead it rewards middle-class families who can afford huge investments in their children's education ... Frightening, eye-opening stuff' The Times, Books of the Year Even in the midst of runaway economic inequality and dangerous social division, it remains an axiom of modern life that meritocracy reigns supreme and promises to open opportunity to all. The idea that reward should follow ability and effort is so entrenched in our psyche that, even as society divides itself at almost every turn, all sides can be heard repeating meritocratic notions. Meritocracy cuts to the heart of who we think we are. But what if, both up and down the social ladder, meritocracy is a sham? Today, meritocracy has become exactly what it was conceived to resist: a mechanism for the concentration and dynastic transmission of wealth and privilege across generations. Upward mobility has become a fantasy, and the embattled middle classes are now more likely to sink into the working poor than to rise into the professional elite. At the same time, meritocracy now ensnares even those who manage to claw their way to the top, requiring rich adults to work with crushing intensity, exploiting their expensive educations in order to extract a return. All this is not the result of deviations or retreats from meritocracy but rather stems directly from meritocracy's successes. This is the radical argument that The Meritocracy Trap prosecutes with rare force, comprehensive research, and devastating persuasion. Daniel Markovits, a law professor trained in philosophy and economics, is better placed than most to puncture one of the dominant ideas of our age. Having spent his life at elite universities, he knows from the inside the corrosive system we are trapped within, as well as how we can take the first steps towards a world that might afford us both prosperity and dignity.