The Rise of Tea Culture in China

This distinctive and enlightening book explores the development of tea drinking in China, using tea culture to explore the profound question of how Chinese have traditionally expressed individuality.

Author: Bret Hinsch

Publisher: Rowman & Littlefield

ISBN: 9781442251793

Category: History

Page: 172

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This distinctive and enlightening book explores the development of tea drinking in China, using tea culture to explore the profound question of how Chinese have traditionally expressed individuality. By linking tea to individualism, Hinsch’s deeply researched book makes an original and influential contribution to the history of Chinese culture.

A History of Food Culture in China

The rise of tribute tea prompted the cultivation of refined tea and development of tea sets. The alcohol policy forced more people turn to tea. Chinese tea culture completed its formation under these circumstances.

Author:

Publisher: World Scientific

ISBN: 9781938368271

Category: History

Page: 188

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"Since the 1980s, China has developed a broader and deeper connection with the world. One of the most intriguing aspects of Chinese culture is its rich cuisine and fascinating cooking. China is a nation with a long history of food culture, and food has become an essential part of Chinese culture. This book tells in sprightly and straightforward language about the structure of traditional Chinese food, food customs for festivals and celebrations in China, Chinese dining etiquette, traditional food and cooking methods, healthy and medicinal diets, as well as historical exchanges of foods between China and other nations. It can present to the readers a complete and truthful picture of the summarized history and culture of Chinese food."--

African Agency in China s Tea Trade

The Rise of Tea Culture in China: The Invention of the Individual. Lanham: Rowman & Littlefield. Hirsch, Eric and Marilyn Strathern (eds). 2004. Transactions and Creations: Property Debates and the Stimulus in Melanesia.

Author: Ute Röschenthaler

Publisher: BRILL

ISBN: 9789004505698

Category: Social Science

Page: 366

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This study highlights the agency of African economic actors in the green tea trade between China and West Africa, their unique tea brand designs, their challenges and successes, and the social and cultural context in which they conduct their work.

Tea in China

Also, much of the evidence for the history of tea comes from the elite strata of Chinese society and necessarily reflects ... The growth of tea drinking and tea culture was also dependent on the infrastructure of the Chinese empire that ...

Author: James A. Benn

Publisher: University of Hawaii Press

ISBN: 9780824853983

Category: History

Page: 304

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Tea in China explores the contours of religious and cultural transformation in traditional China from the point of view of an everyday commodity and popular beverage. The work traces the development of tea drinking from its mythical origins to the nineteenth century and examines the changes in aesthetics, ritual, science, health, and knowledge that tea brought with it. The shift in drinking habits that occurred in late medieval China cannot be understood without an appreciation of the fact that Buddhist monks were responsible for not only changing people's attitudes toward the intoxicating substance, but also the proliferation of tea drinking. Monks had enjoyed a long association with tea in South China, but it was not until Lu Yu's compilation of the Chajing (The Classic of Tea) and the spread of tea drinking by itinerant Chan monastics that tea culture became popular throughout the empire and beyond. Tea was important for maintaining long periods of meditation; it also provided inspiration for poets and profoundly affected the ways in which ideas were exchanged. Prior to the eighth century, the aristocratic drinking party had excluded monks from participating in elite culture. Over cups of tea, however, monks and literati could meet on equal footing and share in the same aesthetic values. Monks and scholars thus found common ground in the popular stimulant—one with few side effects that was easily obtainable and provided inspiration and energy for composing poetry and meditating. In addition, rituals associated with tea drinking were developed in Chan monasteries, aiding in the transformation of China's sacred landscape at the popular and elite level. Pilgrimages to monasteries that grew their own tea were essential in the spread of tea culture, and some monasteries owned vast tea plantations. By the end of the ninth century, tea was a vital component in the Chinese economy and in everyday life. Tea in China transcends the boundaries of religious studies and cultural history as it draws on a broad range of materials—poetry, histories, liturgical texts, monastic regulations—many translated or analyzed for the first time. The book will be of interest to scholars of East Asia and all those concerned with the religious dimensions of commodity culture in the premodern world.

The United States and China

North China at War: The Social Ecology of Revolution, 1937–1945 edited by Feng Chongyi and David S. G. Goodman The ... Masculinities in Chinese History by Bret Hinsch The Rise of Tea Culture in China: The Invention of the Individual by ...

Author: Dong Wang

Publisher: Rowman & Littlefield

ISBN: 9781538149393

Category: History

Page: 416

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Now fully revised and updated, The United States and China offers a comprehensive synthesis of US-Chinese relations from initial contact to the present. Balancing the modern (1784–1949) and contemporary (1949–present) periods, Dong Wang retraces centuries of interaction between two of the world’s great powers from the perspective of both sides. She examines state-to-state diplomacy, as well as economic, social, military, religious, and cultural interplay within varying national and international contexts. As China itself continues to grow in global importance, so too does the US-Chinese relationship, and this book provides an essential grounding for understanding its past, present, and possible futures.

China in Revolution

North China at War: The Social Ecology of Revolution, 1937–1945 edited by Feng Chongyi and David S. G. Goodman The ... Masculinities in Chinese History by Bret Hinsch The Rise of Tea Culture in China: The Invention of the Individual by ...

Author: Joseph W Esherick

Publisher: Rowman & Littlefield

ISBN: 9781538162781

Category:

Page: 447

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This book examines key events in modern Chinese history to question the notion of historical inevitability and stresses the role of contingent circumstances. The constant change and diversity of Chinese society contrasts the persistence of a unitary autocratic state and suggest a key lesson in history is that China will continue to surprise us.

Longmen s Stone Buddhas and Cultural Heritage

Little Friends: Children's Film and Media Culture in China by Stephanie Hemelryk Donald Beachheads: War, Peace, ... Masculinities in Chinese History by Bret Hinsch The Rise of Tea Culture in China: The Invention of the Individual by ...

Author: Dong Wang

Publisher: Rowman & Littlefield Publishers

ISBN: 9781538141120

Category: China

Page: 304

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"Based on original research and empirical sources in Chinese, English, French, German, Japanese, and Swedish, this book refracts modern and contemporary China through the lens of an important historical site, Luoyang's Longmen cave carvings, laden with Chinese as well as international political and cultural symbolism"--

Green with Milk and Sugar

Victor H. Mair and Erling Hoh, The True History of Tea (London: Thames and Hudson, 2009), 23–39. 2. Bret Hinsch, The Rise of Tea Culture in China: The Invention of the Individual (Latham, MD: Rowman and Littlefield, 2015), 71–103. 3.

Author: Robert Hellyer

Publisher: Columbia University Press

ISBN: 9780231552943

Category: Cooking

Page:

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Today, Americans are some of the world’s biggest consumers of black teas; in Japan, green tea, especially sencha, is preferred. These national partialities, Robert Hellyer reveals, are deeply entwined. Tracing the trans-Pacific tea trade from the eighteenth century onward, Green with Milk and Sugar shows how interconnections between Japan and the United States have influenced the daily habits of people in both countries. Hellyer explores the forgotten American penchant for Japanese green tea and how it shaped Japanese tastes. In the nineteenth century, Americans favored green teas, which were imported from China until Japan developed an export industry centered on the United States. The influx of Japanese imports democratized green tea: Americans of all classes, particularly Midwesterners, made it their daily beverage—which they drank hot, often with milk and sugar. In the 1920s, socioeconomic trends and racial prejudices pushed Americans toward black teas from Ceylon and India. Facing a glut, Japanese merchants aggressively marketed sencha on their home and imperial markets, transforming it into an icon of Japanese culture. Featuring lively stories of the people involved in the tea trade—including samurai turned tea farmers and Hellyer’s own ancestors—Green with Milk and Sugar offers not only a social and commodity history of tea in the United States and Japan but also new insights into how national customs have profound if often hidden international dimensions.

Zen and Material Culture

This dual character would define tea culture as it traveled and changed over the centuries. ... Another useful source for the study of the emergence of tea culture in China comes from Famen Temple in Shaanxi Province, China, ...

Author: Pamela D. Winfield

Publisher: Oxford University Press

ISBN: 9780190469313

Category: Religion

Page: 336

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The stereotype of Zen Buddhism as a minimalistic or even immaterial meditative tradition persists in the Euro-American cultural imagination. This volume calls attention to the vast range of "stuff" in Zen by highlighting the material abundance and iconic range of the Soto, Rinzai, and Obaku sects in Japan. Chapters on beads, bowls, buildings, staffs, statues, rags, robes, and even retail commodities in America all shed new light on overlooked items of lay and monastic practice in both historical and contemporary perspectives. Nine authors from the cognate fields of art history, religious studies, and the history of material culture analyze these "Zen matters" in all four senses of the phrase: the interdisciplinary study of Zen's matters (objects and images) ultimately speaks to larger Zen matters (ideas, ideals) that matter (in the predicate sense) to both male and female practitioners, often because such matters (economic considerations) help to ensure the cultural and institutional survival of the tradition. Zen and Material Culture expands the study of Japanese Zen Buddhism to include material inquiry as an important complement to mainly textual, institutional, or ritual studies. It also broadens the traditional purview of art history by incorporating the visual culture of everyday Zen objects and images into the canon of recognized masterpieces by elite artists. Finally, the volume extends Japanese material and visual cultural studies into new research territory by taking up Zen's rich trove of materia liturgica and supplementing the largely secular approach to studying Japanese popular culture. This groundbreaking volume will be a resource for anyone whose interests lie at the intersection of Zen art, architecture, history, ritual, tea ceremony, women's studies, and the fine line between Buddhist materiality and materialism.

Living the Good Life

Consumption in the Qing and Ottoman Empires of the Eighteenth Century Elif Akçetin, Suraiya Faroqhi ... On the emergence of tea connoisseurship in early imperial China, see Bret Hinsch, The Rise of Tea Culture in China: The Invention of ...

Author: Elif Akçetin

Publisher: BRILL

ISBN: 9789004353459

Category: History

Page: 592

View: 723

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An exploration how consumer goods in eighteenth-century Qing and Ottoman empires furthered the expansion of social networks, the creation of alliances between rulers and regional elites, and particularly, the expression of elite, urban, and gender identities