Philosophers and Their Poets

This book offers essays by leading scholars that address each of the major figures of this tradition and the respective poets they engage, including Schiller, Archilochus, Pindar, Hölderlin, Eliot, and Celan, while also discussing the ...

Author: Charles Bambach

Publisher: SUNY Press

ISBN: 9781438477046

Category: Philosophy

Page: 282

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Examines the role that poets and the poetic word play in the formation of philosophical thinking in the modern German tradition. Several of the most celebrated philosophers in the German tradition since Kant afford to poetry an all-but-unprecedented status in Western thought. Fichte, Hegel, Nietzsche, Heidegger, and Gadamer argue that the scope, limits, and possibilities of philosophy are intimately intertwined with those of poetry. For them, poetic thinking itself is understood as intrinsic to the kind of thinking that defines philosophical inquiry and the philosophical life, and they developed their views through extensive and sustained considerations of specific poets, as well as specific poetic figures and images. This book offers essays by leading scholars that address each of the major figures of this tradition and the respective poets they engage, including Schiller, Archilochus, Pindar, Hölderlin, Eliot, and Celan, while also discussing the poets’ contemporary relevance to philosophy in the continental tradition. Above all, the book explores an approach to language that rethinks its role as a mere tool for communication or for the dissemination of knowledge. Here language will be understood as an essential event that opens up the world in a primordial sense whereby poetry comes to have a deeply ethical significance for human beings. In this way, the volume positions ethics at the center of continental discourse, even as it engages philosophy itself as a discourse about language attuned to the rigor of what poetry ultimately expresses. Charles Bambach is Professor of Philosophy at the University of Texas at Dallas. He is the author of several books, including Thinking the Poetic Measure of Justice: Hölderlin–Heidegger–Celan, also published by SUNY Press. Theodore George is Associate Professor of Philosophy at Texas A&M University. He is the author of Tragedies of Spirit: Tracing Finitude in Hegel’s Phenomenology and the translator of Günter Figal’s Objectivity: The Hermeneutical and Philosophy, both also published by SUNY Press.

On the Anarchy of Poetry and Philosophy

This book takes seriously the transformation of art into philosophy, focusing upon the systematic interest that so many European philosophers take in modernism.

Author: Gerald L. Bruns

Publisher: Fordham Univ Press

ISBN: 9780823226320

Category: Literary Criticism

Page: 274

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Marcel Duchamp once asked whether it is possible to make something that is not a work of art. This question returns over and over in modernist culture, where there are no longer any authoritative criteria for what can be identified (or excluded) as a work of art. As William Carlos Williams says, A poem can be made of anything, even newspaper clippings.At this point, art turns into philosophy, all art is now conceptual art, and the manifesto becomes the distinctive genre of modernism. This book takes seriously this transformation of art into philosophy, focusing upon the systematic interest that so many European philosophers take in modernism. Among the philosophers Gerald Bruns discusses are Theodor W. Adorno, Maurice Blanchot, Arthur Danto, Stanley Cavell, Hans-Georg Gadamer, Michel Foucault, Gilles Deleuze and Felix Guattari, Jacques Derrida, Jean-Franois Lyotard, Jean-Luc Nancy, Philippe Lacoue-Labarthe, and Emmanuel Levinas.As Bruns demonstrates, the difficulty of much modern and contemporary poetry can be summarized in the idea that a poem is made of words, not of any of the things that we use words to produce: meanings, concepts, propositions, narratives, or expressions of feeling. Many modernist poets have argued that in poetry language is no longer a form of mediation but a reality to be explored and experienced in its own right. But what sort of experience, philosophically, might this be? The problem of the materiality or hermetic character of poetic language inevitably leads to questions of how philosophy itself is to be written and what sort of communitydefines the work of art-or, for that matter, the work of philosophy.In this provocative study, Bruns answers that the culture of modernism is a kind of anarchist community, where the work of art is apt to be as much an event or experience-or, indeed, an alternative form of life-as a formal object. In modern writing, philosophy and poetry fold into one another. In this book, Bruns helps us to see how.

Things Merely Are

This book is an invitation to read poetry. Simon Critchley argues that poetry enlarges life with a range of observation, power of expression and attention to language that eclipses any other medium.

Author: Simon Critchley

Publisher: Routledge

ISBN: 9781134251063

Category: Philosophy

Page: 160

View: 599

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This book is an invitation to read poetry. Simon Critchley argues that poetry enlarges life with a range of observation, power of expression and attention to language that eclipses any other medium. In a rich engagement with the poetry of Wallace Stevens, Critchley reveals that poetry also contains deep and important philosophical insight. Above all, he agues for a 'poetic epistemology' that enables us to think afresh the philosophical problem of the relation between mind and world, and ultimately to cast the problem away. Drawing astutely on Kant, the German and English Romantics and Heidegger, Critchley argues that through its descriptions of particular things and their stubborn plainness - whether water, guitars, trees, or cats - poetry evokes the 'mereness' of things. It is this experience, he shows, that provokes the mood of calm and releases the imaginative insight we need to press back against the pressure of reality. Critchley also argues that this calm defines the cinematic eye of Terrence Malick, whose work is discussed at the end of the book.

Of Leaves and Ashes

Patty Ho's essay 'A solitary song for nothing', which concludes the book, discusses poetry and philosophy. Philosophy and poetry concerning existence, truth, love and beauty, are intermingled in this book of leaves and ashes.

Author: Patty Ho

Publisher:

ISBN: 9888228048

Category:

Page: 130

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OF LEAVES & ASHES by Patty Ho is a collection of poems: among these, some relate to philosophy and some to old Chinese poems to which Patty Ho has added new thoughts. Love and pain, dreams and disillusion, leaves and memories, ashes and hopes, encounters and homecomings, sorrow and beauty... all are interwoven in the poems in this book. The notes contain Patty Ho's translations of the Chinese poems quoted in the book. Patty Ho has an intense interest in English and Chinese poetry, philosophy and music. She found inspiration for her poems from the enlightening thoughts of great philosophers as well as from the poetry of the Tang and Sung Dynasties. This book integrates treasured quotations and inspiration from famous philosophers and poets (both Chinese and Western) across the centuries. Patty Ho's essay 'A solitary song for nothing', which concludes the book, discusses poetry and philosophy. Philosophy and poetry concerning existence, truth, love and beauty, are intermingled in this book of leaves and ashes... "Here, love that can raise the dead is dancing; Here, there is blending of philosophy and poetry; Music flows with beauty; butterflies soar with dreams..." -"Reeds" (Translated by Patty Ho) "Drawn together by the calls of their being, the poetess and her readers are engaged in a journey: a shared journey of discovery." - Horace Wong "Patty's poetry shows us the world of thinking and feeling, love and tragedy, sadness and happiness, peace and turmoil, memory and oblivion, desire and frustration, and truth and untruth." -Professor Cheung Chan-Fai

Opposite

What happens when poetry and philosophy connect? In 'Opposite,' award-winning poet Helen Mort and Professor of Philosophical Aesthetics Aaron Meskin set out to answer that very question.

Author: HELEN. MESKIN MORT (AARON.)

Publisher:

ISBN: 1912436213

Category:

Page: 64

View: 784

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The Quarrel Between Poetry and Philosophy

His thinking is a useful signpost, both as an historical barometer of the poetry-philosophy quarrel, and as an illustration of how one of the most ...

Author: John Burns

Publisher: Routledge

ISBN: 9781000169263

Category: Literary Criticism

Page: 112

View: 463

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The Quarrel Between Poetry and Philosophy: Perspectives Across the Humanities is an interdisciplinary study of the abiding quarrel to which poet-philosopher Plato referred centuries ago in the Republic. The book presents eight chapters by four humanities scholars that historically contextualize and cross-interpret aspects of the quarrel in question. The authors share the view that although poets and philosophers continually quarrel, a harmonious union between the two groups is achievable in a manner promising application to a variety of contemporary cultural-political and aesthetic debates, all of which have implications for the current status of the humanities.

With Poetry and Philosophy

it another way, the poetic rope may remain, despite itself, ... as an interlocking dialogue of forms in Wordsworth's attempt to produce a poetic philosophy.

Author: David Miller

Publisher: Cambridge Scholars Publishing

ISBN: 9781443802758

Category: Literary Criticism

Page: 125

View: 398

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Taking its point of initiation from the long-standing dialogue between poetry and philosophy concerning their respective claims to contrasting orders of insight, this book tackles issues relating to the differing conditions of knowledge and insights relating to language and thought imparted by ‘modern’ poets and philosophers, from Kant and Wordsworth to Adorno and Hardy. The book draws on recent debates in literary theory and philosophy in order to outline a new ‘dialogic’ approach for conducting comparative criticism and literary history. The poets and the philosophers appear under configurations of reading that produce considerations that are unexpected, yet strangely fitting.

Poetry and Philosophy in the Middle Ages

PETER ABELARD AND THE POETS David Luscombe Over twenty years ago Jean Jolivet discussed the presentation by Peter Abelard of the philosophers of antiquity ...

Author: John Marenbon

Publisher: BRILL

ISBN: 9004119647

Category: Religion

Page: 392

View: 185

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A collection of essays written by pupils, friends and colleagues of Professor Peter Dronke, to honour him on his retirement. The essays address the question of the relationship between poetry and philosophy in the Middle Ages. Contributors include Walter Berschin, Charles Burnett, Stephen Gersh, Michael Herren, Edouard Jeauneau, David Luscombe, Paul Gerhardt Schmidt, Joe Trapp, Jill Mann, Claudio Orlandi and John Marenbon. It is an important collection for both philosophical and literary specialists; scholars, graduate students and under-graduates in Medieval Literature and in Medieval Philosophy.

The Ancient Quarrel Between Philosophy and Poetry

1 Western philosophy, from early in its history, has characterized itself in ... this distinction, what role the work of poetry was to have in philosophy.

Author: Raymond Barfield

Publisher: Cambridge University Press

ISBN: 9781139497091

Category: Philosophy

Page:

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From its beginnings, philosophy's language, concepts and imaginative growth have been heavily influenced by poetry and poets. Drawing on the work of a wide range of thinkers throughout the history of Western philosophy, Raymond Barfield explores the pervasiveness of poetry's impact on philosophy and, conversely, how philosophy has sometimes resisted or denied poetry's influence. Although some thinkers, like Giambatista Vico and Nietzsche, praised the wisdom of poets, and saw poetry and philosophy as mutually beneficial pursuits, others resented, diminished or eliminated the importance of poetry in philosophy. Beginning with the famous passage in Plato's Republic in which Socrates exiles the poets from the city, this book traces the history of the ancient quarrel between philosophy and poetry through the works of thinkers in the Western tradition ranging from Plato to the work of the contemporary thinker Mikhail Bakhtin.

Poetry and Philosophy from Homer to Rousseau

But as a moral philosopher he has not been superseded.10 His great work is ... Both of them mix poetry and philosophy; they treat concepts as living beings.

Author: S. Haines

Publisher: Springer

ISBN: 9780230502772

Category: Literary Criticism

Page: 214

View: 762

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This accessible and jargon-free book features readings of over 20 key texts and authors in Western poetry and philosophy, including Homer, Plato, Beowulf , Dante, Chaucer, Shakespeare and Rousseau. Simon Haines presents a thought-provoking and theoretically aware account of Western literature and philosophy, arguing that the history of both can be seen as a struggle between two different conceptions of the self: the 'romantic' (or dualist) vs the 'realist' or ('extended').

The Ancient Quarrel Between Poetry and Philosophy

As we have seen, each of the three Attic poets had his own characteristic way of combining “poetry” and “philosophy.” It seems probable that an examination ...

Author: Thomas Gould

Publisher: Princeton University Press

ISBN: 9781400861866

Category: Drama

Page: 348

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Affecting audiences with depictions of suffering and injustice is a key function of tragedy, and yet it has long been viewed by philosophers as a dubious enterprise. In this book Thomas Gould uses both historical and theoretical approaches to explore tragedy and its power to gratify readers and audiences. He takes as his starting point Plato's moral and psychological objections to tragedy, and the conflict he recognized between "poetry"--the exploitation of our yearning to see ourselves as victims--and "philosophy"--the insistence that all good people are happy. Plato's objections to tragedy are shown to be an essential feature of Socratic rationalism and to constitute a formidable challenge even today. Gould makes a case for the rightness and psychological necessity of violence and suffering in literature, art, and religion, but he distinguishes between depictions of violence that elicit sympathy only for the victims and those that cause us to sympathize entirely with the perpetrators. It is chiefly the former, Gould argues, that fuel our responses not only to true tragedy but also to religious myths and critical displays of political rage. Originally published in 1990. The Princeton Legacy Library uses the latest print-on-demand technology to again make available previously out-of-print books from the distinguished backlist of Princeton University Press. These editions preserve the original texts of these important books while presenting them in durable paperback and hardcover editions. The goal of the Princeton Legacy Library is to vastly increase access to the rich scholarly heritage found in the thousands of books published by Princeton University Press since its founding in 1905.

Homer and Hesiod

To understand their innovations properly, this work begins with the presentation of an account of the nature of religion and myth and in particular of the disclosure of truth achieved in myth.

Author: Richard Gotshalk

Publisher: University Press of Amer

ISBN: UOM:39015049976551

Category: Literary Criticism

Page: 373

View: 134

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Homer and Hesiod, Myth and Philosophy is a study of the nature and function of the poetry of Homer and Hesiod when their work is considered in historical context as the initial significant developments of poetry as a distinctive voice for truth beyond religion and myth. To understand their innovations properly, this work begins with the presentation of an account of the nature of religion and myth and in particular of the disclosure of truth achieved in myth. Then it takes up the Homeric and Hesiodic innovations which transform the bardic poetry that was heritage from at least Mycenaean times and that make the inspired poet an educative voice for truth. After giving an account of the four major poems in which this transformation is embodied: Illiad and Odyssey, Theogony and Works and Days, the work concludes with a discussion of how these creations shaped the matrix within which philosophy arose. In this way it points to why the distinctive realization of philosophy in Greece (as contrasted with that in China and India) involved what the Platonic Socrates can speak of as "an ancient quarrel between poetry and philosophy."

Lucretius Poetry Philosophy Science

The current volume seeks to unite the three disciplinary aspects - poetry, philosophy, and science - in order to offer a holistic response to an important monument in cultural history.

Author: Daryn Lehoux

Publisher: OUP Oxford

ISBN: 9780191650802

Category: History

Page: 338

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Lucretius' didactic masterpiece De Rerum Natura (On the Nature of Things) is one of the most brilliant and powerful poems in the Latin language, a passionate attempt at dispelling humanity's fear of death and its enslavement by false beliefs about the gods, and a detailed exposition of Epicurean atomist physics. For centuries, it has raised the question of whether it is primarily a poem or primarily a philosophical treatise, which also presents scientific doctrine. The current volume seeks to unite the three disciplinary aspects - poetry, philosophy, and science - in order to offer a holistic response to an important monument in cultural history. With ten original essays and an analytical introduction, the volume aims not only to combine different approaches within single covers, but to offer responses to the poem by experts from all three scholarly backgrounds. Philosophers and scholars of ancient science look closely at the artistic placement of individual words, while literary critics explore ethical matters and the contribution of Lucretius' poetry to the argument of the poem. Topics covered include death and grief, evolution and the cosmos, ethics and politics, perception, and epistemology.

Edgar Allen Poe The Philosophy of Composition

Seminar paper from the year 2005 in the subject American Studies - Literature, grade: 2,3, University of Koblenz-Landau (Institut für fremdsprachliche Philologien Anglistik), course: The American Short Story in the 19th Century, 6 entries ...

Author: Babette Lippmann

Publisher: GRIN Verlag

ISBN: 9783638694117

Category:

Page: 72

View: 617

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Seminar paper from the year 2005 in the subject American Studies - Literature, grade: 2,3, University of Koblenz-Landau (Institut für fremdsprachliche Philologien Anglistik), course: The American Short Story in the 19th Century, 6 entries in the bibliography, language: English, abstract: This paper is written for a seminar titled "American Short Stories"; It discusses Poes Essay on how to write the perfect poem; a full analysis of "the Raven" is included (this analysis is NOT based on my own ideas - it is just facts that were mentioned in the seminar, in general I refer to one author but for citation please use e.g. "Stovall, Floyed" see list of works cited); after having discussed The philosophy" and "The Raven" the paper tries to find out to what extent Poe created a poem according to his standards excerpt introduction: "On the next pages we will have a look on Poe's "The Raven", his essay "The philosophy of Composition" and get in detail with questions like: What is his essay about and what was the author's intention writing an essay about the only way creating a fiction work? Did Poe compose his "Raven" exactly that way or are there clues that Poe couldn't cope with his own ideas?"

The Banquet

Book 4 is by far the longest of the Banquet, and is noticeably distinct from the two books that precede it. The subject of book 4 is the nature of nobility.

Author: Dante Alighieri

Publisher: Createspace Independent Publishing Platform

ISBN: 1548112747

Category:

Page: 204

View: 334

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The Banquet is a work written by Dante Alighieri roughly between 1304 and 1307. This unfinished work of Dante consists of four trattati, or "books": a prefatory one, plus three books that each include a canzone (long lyrical poem) and a prose allegorical interpretation or commentary of the poem that goes off in multiple thematic directions. The Banquet is a major stage of development for Dante, very different from the visionary world of the Vita nuova (although like the earlier work it too is a medium for the author's evolving sense of artistic vocation and philosophical-spiritual quest). This difference is reflected in how the two works use the prosimetrum format: in the Vita Nova there is a complex interrelation and intertwining between the prose and the poetry, while in the Banquet large blocks of prose have an autonomous existence apart from the poems; the content of the poetry is not amplified or edited in the prose so much as commented upon prosaically, to serve as points of departure for the various subjects that the Banquet discusses. Dante himself tells us that the prose of the Banquet is "temperate and virile," in contrast to the "fervid and passionate" prose of the Vita Nova; and that while the approach to this in the work of his youth was "like dreaming" the Banquet approaches it subjects soberly and wide awake, often modeling its style on Scholastic authors. The Banquet is a kind of vernacular encyclopedia of the knowledge of Dante's time; it touches on many areas of learning, not only philosophy but also politics, linguistics, science, and history. The treatise begins with the prefatory book, or proem, which explains why a book like the Banquet is needed and why Dante is writing it in the vernacular instead of Latin. It is one of Dante's early defenses of the vernacular, expressed in greater detail in his (slightly earlier) linguistic treatise De vulgari eloquentia (On Eloquence in the Vernacular). Books 2 and 3 form a unit, both focusing on Dante's new love after the death of Beatrice-his love for Lady Philosophy, "the most beautiful and dignified daughter of the Emperor of the universe," as he calls her. Book 2 discusses allegory and Lady Philosophy (in connection with the canzone Voi che 'ntendendo il terzo ciel movete [You who move the third heaven with an act of the intellect], which opens the book), and also brings such subjects as astronomy, angelology, and the soul's immortality. Book 3 is a hymn of praise for philosophy, launched by an allegorical interpretation of Dante's great canzone Amor che ne la mente mi ragiona (Love, who speaks to me in my mind). In this book, Dante asserts that true philosophy cannot arise from any ulterior motives, such as prestige or money-it is only possible when the seeker has a love of wisdom for its own sake. Book 4 is by far the longest of the Banquet, and is noticeably distinct from the two books that precede it. The subject of book 4 is the nature of nobility. It opens with the longest canzone of the Banquet, Le dolci rime d'amor (Those sweet poems of love), which is explicitly about gentilezza or nobility, as well as a condemnation of avarice, asserting that reason and the spirit of acquisition are mutually incompatible. The first half of book 4's thirty chapters are dedicated to debunking the false idea of nobility as an inherited trait, one restricted to the aristocracy, while the final fifteen chapters delineate what true nobility consists of-the perfection of a thing according to its nature-and how nobility manifests in people at various stages of life. The Banquet, in its autobiographical passages and in the trajectories of its lines of thought, gives us a rich portrait of Dante himself, of great importance for an understanding of his work as a whole, especially the Divine Comedy.

Philosophy as Poetry

To take the side of the poets in this quarrel is to say that there are many ... Philosophy stands in opposition to poetry just insofar as it insists that ...

Author: Richard Rorty

Publisher: University of Virginia Press

ISBN: 9780813939346

Category: Religion

Page: 96

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Undeniably iconoclastic, and doggedly practical where others were abstract, the late Richard Rorty was described by some as a philosopher with no philosophy. Rorty was skeptical of systems claiming to have answers, seeing scientific and aesthetic schools as vocabularies rather than as indispensable paths to truth. But his work displays a profound awareness of philosophical tradition and an urgent concern for how we create a society. As Michael Bérubé writes in his introduction to this new volume, Rorty looked upon philosophy as "a creative enterprise of dreaming up new and more humane ways to live." Drawn from Rorty’s acclaimed 2004 Page-Barbour lectures, Philosophy as Poetry distills many of the central ideas in his work. Rorty begins by addressing poetry and philosophy, which are often seen as contradictory pursuits. He offers a view of philosophy as a poem, beginning with the ancient Greeks and rewritten by succeeding generations of philosophers seeking to improve it. He goes on to examine analytic philosophy and the rejection by some philosophers, notably Wittgenstein, of the notion of philosophical problems that have solutions. The book concludes with an invigorating suspension of intellectual borders as Rorty focuses on the romantic tradition and relates it to philosophic thought. This book makes an ideal starting place for anyone looking for an introduction to Rorty’s thought and his contribution to our sense of an American pragmatism, as well as an understanding of his influence and the controversy that attended his work. Page-Barbour Lectures

Poetry Philosophy and Theology in Conversation

'Hopkins – Poetry and Philosophy'. Studies: An Irish Quarterly Review 84.334 (1995): 160–7. Deleuze, Gilles, and Pierre Guattari.

Author: Francesca Bugliani Knox

Publisher: Routledge

ISBN: 9781351796019

Category: Religion

Page: 240

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This volume is a collection of essays that explains how literature, philosophy and theology have explored the role of wonder in our lives, particularly through poetry. Wonder has been an object of fascination for these disciplines from the Greek antiquity onwards, yet the connections between their views on the subject are often ignored in subject specific studies. The book is divided into three parts: Part I opens the conversation on wonder in philosophy, Part II is given to theology and Part III to literary perspectives. An international set of contributors, including poets as well as scholars, have produced a study that looks beyond traditional chronological, geographical and disciplinary boundaries, both within the individual essays themselves and in respect to one another. The volume’s wide historical framework is punctuated by four poems by contemporary poets on the theme of wonder. An unconventional foray into one of the best-known themes of the European tradition, this book will be of great interest to scholars of literature, theology and philosophy.