The NexStar Evolution and SkyPortal User s Guide

This book serves as a comprehensive guide for using a Nexstar Evolution mount with WiFi SkyPortal control, walking the reader through the process for aligning and operating the system from a tablet or smartphone.

Author: James L. Chen

Publisher: Springer

ISBN: 9783319325392

Category: Science

Page: 219

View: 489

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This book serves as a comprehensive guide for using a Nexstar Evolution mount with WiFi SkyPortal control, walking the reader through the process for aligning and operating the system from a tablet or smartphone. The next generation Go-To mount from Celestron, this is compatible not only with the Nextstar Evolution but also with older mounts. It is the ideal resource for anyone who owns, or is thinking of owning, a Nexstar Evolution telescope, or adapting their existing Celestron mount. Pros and cons of the system are thoroughly covered with a critical depth that addresses any possible question by users. Beginning with a brief history of Go-To telescopes and the genesis of this still new technology, the author covers every aspect of the newly expanding capability in observing. This includes the associated Sky Portal smartphone and tablet application, the transition from the original Nexstar GoTo system to the new SkyPortal system, the use of the Sky Portal application with its Sky Safari 4 basic software and Celestron WiFi adaptations, and discussions on the use of SkyPortal application using the Celestron adapter on older Celestron mounts. Comments and recommendations for equipment enable the reader to successfully use and appreciate the new WiFi capability without becoming overwhelmed. Extensively illustrated using actual screenshots from the program interface, this is the only guide to the Nextstar SkyPortal an observer will need.

The NexStar User s Guide II

If you intend to use your tablet or smartphone as the primary means of controlling your NexStar Evolution, be sure to test the SkyPortal app (available for free in Google Play and the Apple App Store) on your smartphone or tablet in ...

Author: Michael Swanson

Publisher: Springer

ISBN: 9783319649337

Category: Science

Page: 274

View: 350

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Michael Swanson’s online discussions with literally thousands of NexStar owners made it clear that there was a desperate need for a book such as this – one that provides a complete, detailed guide to buying, using and maintaining NexStar telescopes. Although this book is highly comprehensive, it is suitable for beginners – there is a chapter on "Astronomy Basics" – and experts alike. Celestron’s NexStar telescopes were introduced in 1999, beginning with their first computer controlled "go to" model, a 5-inch. More models appeared in quick succession, and Celestron’s new range made it one of the two dominant manufacturers of affordable "go to" telescopes.

Astronomy for Older Eyes

A Guide for Aging Backyard Astronomers James L. Chen ... His third and fourth books are user guides for GoTo telescopes and mounts: The Vixen Star Book User Guide and The NexStar Evolution and SkyPortal User Guide.

Author: James L. Chen

Publisher: Springer

ISBN: 9783319524139

Category: Science

Page: 236

View: 316

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This book is for the aging amateur astronomy population, including newcomers to astronomy in their retirement and hobbyists who loved peering through a telescope as a child. Whether a novice or an experienced observer, the practice of astronomy differs over the years. This guide will extend the enjoyment of astronomy well into the Golden Years by addressing topics such as eye and overall health issues, recommendations on telescope equipment, and astronomy-related social activities especially suited for seniors. Many Baby-Boomers reaching retirement age are seeking new activities, and amateur astronomy is a perfect fit as a leisure time activity. Established backyard astronomers who began their love of astronomy in their youth, meanwhile, may face many physical and mental challenges in continuing their lifelong hobby as they age beyond their 55th birthdays. That perfect telescope purchased when they were thirty years old now suddenly at sixty years old feels like an immovable object in the living room. The 20/20 eyesight has given way to reading glasses or bifocals. Treasured eyepieces feel all wrong. Growing old is a natural process of life, but astronomy is timeless. With a little knowledge and some lifestyle adjustments, older astronomers can still enjoy backyard observing well into their seventies, eighties and even into their nineties.