The Mysterious William Shakespeare

Discusses the theory that the works of Shakespeare were actually written by the Earl of Oxford

Author: Charlton Ogburn

Publisher: Epm Publications Incorporated

ISBN: IND:32000007475140

Category: Literary Criticism

Page: 892

View: 246

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Discusses the theory that the works of Shakespeare were actually written by the Earl of Oxford

Cultural Shakespeare

Contains essays on Shakespeare published in books and journals between 1985 and 1997.

Author: Graham Holderness

Publisher: Univ of Hertfordshire Press

ISBN: 1902806115

Category: Literary Criticism

Page: 206

View: 955

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Contains essays on Shakespeare published in books and journals between 1985 and 1997.

The Fairy Mythology of Shakespeare

It not only kept alive a memory , it satisfied a psychological demand . Indeed ,
when an incident has become an organic portion of a myth - and to do this it must
fulfil logical and psychological requirements which are none the less real
because ...

Author: Alfred Trübner Nutt

Publisher:

ISBN: UCAL:$B27309

Category: Fairies in literature

Page: 40

View: 265

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Shakespeare Jonson and the Myth of Venice

This work outlines the bright and dark sides of the Myth of Venice, dwelling on four aspects: Venice the Rich, Venice the Wise, Venice the Just, and Venezia-citta-galante.

Author: David C. McPherson

Publisher:

ISBN: UOM:39015021879286

Category: Literary Criticism

Page: 157

View: 689

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This work outlines the bright and dark sides of the Myth of Venice, dwelling on four aspects: Venice the Rich, Venice the Wise, Venice the Just, and Venezia-citta-galante. After describing the channels through which Shakespeare and Jonson could have become aware of this myth, this work uses it to generate new understandings of the Merchant of Venice, Othello, and Volpone.

The Shakespearean Myth

William Shakespeare and Circumstantial Evidence James Appleton Morgan. tion
is as good as another until it is disturbed . It is never safe to underrate an existing
presumption ; as long as it stands at all , it stands as conclusive ; once ...

Author: James Appleton Morgan

Publisher:

ISBN: STANFORD:36105010320781

Category:

Page: 334

View: 972

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The Shakespearean Myth

William Shakespeare and Circumstantial Evidence Appleton Morgan. tion is as
good as another until it is disturbed . It is never safe to underrate an existing
presumption ; as long as it stands at all , it stands as conclusive ; once
overthrown ...

Author: Appleton Morgan

Publisher:

ISBN: HARVARD:HWPAJY

Category:

Page: 342

View: 164

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The Myth of Deliverance

In these essays Northrop Frye addresses a question which preoccupied him throughout his long and distinguished career - the conception of comedy, particularly Shakespearean comedy, and its relation to human experience.

Author: Northrop Frye

Publisher:

ISBN: 0802077811

Category: Drama

Page: 90

View: 766

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In these essays Northrop Frye addresses a question which preoccupied him throughout his long and distinguished career - the conception of comedy, particularly Shakespearean comedy, and its relation to human experience. In most forms of comedy, and certainly in the New Comedy with which Shakespeare was concerned, the emphasis is on moving towards a climax in which the end incorporates the beginning. Such a climax is a vision of deliverance or expanded energy and freedom. Frye draws on the Aristotelian notion of reversal, or peripeteia, to analyse the three plays commonly known as the 'problem comedies': "Measure for Measure," "All's Well That Ends Well," and "Troilus and Cressida," showing how they anticipate the romances of Shakespeare's final period.

30 Great Myths about Shakespeare

Offering a highly engaging narrative, 30 Great Myths about Shakespeare covers the big issues that excite the popular imagination around the man, the theater, and the texts of Shakespeare.

Author: Laurie Maguire

Publisher: John Wiley & Sons

ISBN: 9781118324875

Category: Literary Criticism

Page: 224

View: 302

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Think you know Shakespeare? Think again . . . Was a real skull used in the first performance of Hamlet? Were Shakespeare's plays Elizabethan blockbusters? How much do we really know about the playwright's life? And what of his notorious relationship with his wife? Exploring and exploding 30 popular myths about the great playwright, this illuminating new book evaluates all the evidence to show how historical material—or its absence—can be interpreted and misinterpreted, and what this reveals about our own personal investment in the stories we tell.

The Myth of Rome in Shakespeare and his Contemporaries

On the Roman 'ideology of masculinity', see Kahn, Roman Shakespeare. 3 Both
episodes are in Livy, Ab Urbe Condita, Book 8. On the 'characteristic virtues of
Rome', as expressed by Livy and others, see P. G. Walsh, Livy, pp. 66–91; and ...

Author: Warren Chernaik

Publisher: Cambridge University Press

ISBN: 9781139499965

Category: Literary Criticism

Page:

View: 381

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When Cleopatra expresses a desire to die 'after the high Roman fashion', acting in accordance with 'what's brave, what's noble', Shakespeare is suggesting that there are certain values that are characteristically Roman. The use of the terms 'Rome' and 'Roman' in Julius Caesar, Antony and Cleopatra or Jonson's Sejanus often carry the implication that most people fail to live up to this ideal of conduct, that very few Romans are worthy of the name. In this book Chernaik demonstrates how, in these plays, Roman values are held up to critical scrutiny. The plays of Shakespeare, Jonson, Massinger and Chapman often present a much darker image of Rome, as exemplifying barbarism rather than civility. Through a comparative analysis of the Roman plays of Shakespeare and his contemporaries, and including detailed discussion of the classical historians Livy, Tacitus and Plutarch, this study examines the uses of Roman history - 'the myth of Rome' - in Shakespeare's age.

The Oxford Shakespeare A Midsummer Night s Dream

While many of the constituent parts of the myth are present , Shakespeare never
offers a direct link to Theseus ' killing of the monster at the heart of the Cretan
labyrinth . The play talks directly of ' mazes ' ( 2.1.99 ) but they are turf mazes , not
 ...

Author: William Shakespeare

Publisher: Oxford Paperbacks

ISBN: 9780199535866

Category: Drama

Page: 288

View: 160

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A Midsummer Night's Dream is perhaps the best loved of Shakespeare's plays. It brings together aristocrats, workers, and fairies in a wood outside Athens, and from there the enchantment begins. In the introduction to this edition, Peter Holland pays particular attention to dreams and dreamers, and to Shakespeare's construction of a world of night and shadows. Both here and in his commentary he explores the play's extensive performance history to illustrate the wide range of interpretations of which it is capable.

Five Lectures on Shakespeare

Shakespeare myth has been spoken of ; but whoever uses this expression to -
day has an entirely different thing in his ... Nicolas Delius , issued a publication in
1851 under the title “ The Myth of Shakespeare , ” the thought of ventilating the ...

Author: Bernhard ten Brink

Publisher:

ISBN: HARVARD:32044086729001

Category:

Page: 248

View: 537

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Myth Ritual and Shakespeare

.Heilman goes on to discuss the mythical aspect of Shakespeare's plays in terms
of his definition of myth . He suggests that Shakespeare's later plays are mythic in
two senses : they draw upon ' vital myths ' and are themselves ' mythic ' .

Author: Rajiva Verma

Publisher:

ISBN: UCAL:B3838508

Category: Myth in literature

Page: 227

View: 417

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This Book Examines The Theory And Practice Of `Myth And Ritual Criticism`. The Subjects Discussed Are The Ideology Of Myth And Myth Criticism And The Relation Of Drama To Scapegoat Rituals, Rites Of Passage And Carnival And Other Festivities.

The Shakespeare Myth

N 1898 the Shakespeare myth was mortally wounded by the curious collection of
"may have beens," "might have beens," "could have beens," "should have beens,
" "must have beens," etc., collected in Sir Sidney Lee's supposititious life of ...

Author: Sir Edwin Durning-Lawrence

Publisher: Ifaac Laggard, and Ed.Blount

ISBN:

Category: Fiction

Page: 31

View: 320

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Example in this ebook THE FOLIO OF THE PLAYS, 1623. IT is now universally admitted that the Plays known as Shakespeare's are the greatest "Birth of Time," the most wonderful product of the human mind which the world has ever seen, that they evince the ripest classical scholarship, the most perfect knowledge of Law, and the most intimate acquaintance with all the intricacies of the highest Court life. The Plays as we know them, appeared in the Folio, published in 1623, seven years after Shakespeare's death in 1616. This volume contains thirty-six plays. Of this number only eight are substantially in the form in which they were printed in Shakespeare's lifetime. Six are greatly improved. Five are practically rewritten, and seventeen are not known to have been printed before Shakespeare's death, although thirteen plays of similar names are registered or in some way referred to. The following particulars are mainly derived from Reed's "Bacon our Shakespeare," published 1902. The spelling of the first Folio of 1623 has, however, been strictly followed. THE EIGHT WHICH ARE PRINTED IN THE FOLIO SUBSTANTIALLY AS THEY ORIGINALLY APPEARED IN THE QUARTOS ARE:— 1. Much ado about Nothing. 2. Loves Labour lost. * 3. Midsommer Nights Dreame. 4. The Merchant of Venice. 5. The First part of King Henry the fourth. 6. The Second part of K. Henry the fourth. 7. Romeo and Juliet. 8. The Tragedie of Troylus and Cressida. ** * Note.—The scene of the play is Navarre and one of the characters is Biron. A passport given to Bacon's brother Anthony in 1586 from the court of Navarre, is signed "Biron." (British Museum Add. MS. 4125). ** Note.—This has a new title and a Prologue in the Folio. This extremely learned play which we are told was "never clapper-clawd with the palmes of the vulger.... or sullied with the smoaky breath of the multitude," has recently been shewn by Mrs. Hinton Stewart to be a satire upon the court of King James I. To be continue in this ebook

Bibliography of the Bacon Shakespeare controversy

168 “ MORGAN ' S SHAKESPEAREAN Myth . ” A notice of the book in the
Westminster Review , London , April 1 , 1882 . 2 pages . Pro - Sh . 169 JUDGE
HOLMES AND HIS GREAT SUBJECT — FRANCIS BACON . By E . W .
TULLIDGE .

Author: William Henry Wyman

Publisher:

ISBN: UCAL:$B658710

Category:

Page: 124

View: 402

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Local and Global Myths in Shakespearean Performance

Departing from a similar moment, this chapter has argued that the German myth
of unser Shakespeare—longstanding, yet finding ever wider expression in the
transnational arena of World War I—was the source of continued myth making ...

Author: Aneta Mancewicz

Publisher: Springer

ISBN: 9783319898513

Category: Literary Criticism

Page: 271

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This collection of scholarly essays offers a new understanding of local and global myths that have been constructed around Shakespeare in theatre, cinema, and television from the nineteenth century to the present. Drawing on a definition of myth as a powerful ideological narrative, Local and Global Myths in Shakespearean Performance examines historical, political, and cultural conditions of Shakespearean performances in Europe, Asia, and North and South America. The first part of this volume offers a theoretical introduction to Shakespeare as myth from a twenty-first century perspective. The second part critically evaluates myths of linguistic transcendence, authenticity, and universality within broader European, neo-liberal, and post-colonial contexts. The study of local identities and global icons in the third part uncovers dynamic relationships between regional, national, and transnational myths of Shakespeare. The fourth part revises persistent narratives concerning a political potential of Shakespeare’s plays in communist and post-communist countries. Finally, part five explores the influence of commercial and popular culture on Shakespeare myths. Michael Dobson’s Afterword concludes the volume by locating Shakespeare within classical mythology and contemporary concerns.

Shakespeare s King Henry the Eighth

And The Tempest William Shakespeare Mrs. Emma Montgomery McRae, Henry
Norman Hudson. The Classic Myths in English Literature . Based chiefly on
Bulfinch ' s " Age of Fable . ” Accompanied by an interpretative and illustrative ...

Author: William Shakespeare

Publisher:

ISBN: HARVARD:HN6PP4

Category:

Page: 461

View: 172

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Shakespeare s Lyric Stage

John Lyly's play, Midas, of 1592 layered the moral allegory of the myth into a new
political critique of colonial prowess. Shakespeare's Midsummer Night's Dream
plants the story into an extended comedy of action and allusion, as the ass's ...

Author: Seth Lerer

Publisher:

ISBN: 9780226582542

Category: Literary Criticism

Page: 275

View: 954

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What does it mean to have an emotional response to poetry and music? And, just as important but considered less often, what does it mean not to have such a response? What happens when lyric utterances—which should invite consolation, revelation, and connection—somehow fall short of the listener’s expectations? As Seth Lerer shows in this pioneering book, Shakespeare’s late plays invite us to contemplate that very question, offering up lyric as a displaced and sometimes desperate antidote to situations of duress or powerlessness. Lerer argues that the theme of lyric misalignment running throughout The Tempest, The Winter’s Tale, Henry VIII, and Cymbeline serves a political purpose, a last-ditch effort at transformation for characters and audiences who had lived through witch-hunting, plague, regime change, political conspiracies, and public executions. A deep dive into the relationship between aesthetics and politics, this book also explores what Shakespearean lyric is able to recuperate for these “victims of history” by virtue of its disjointed utterances. To this end, Lerer establishes the concept of mythic lyricism: an estranging use of songs and poetry that functions to recreate the past as present, to empower the mythic dead, and to restore a bit of magic to the commonplaces and commodities of Jacobean England. Reading against the devotion to form and prosody common in Shakespeare scholarship, Lerer’s account of lyric utterance’s vexed role in his late works offers new ways to understand generational distance and cultural change throughout the playwright’s oeuvre.