The Musical Edge of Therapeutic Dialogue

Drawing on detailed clinical vignettes, he explores shifts in embodied dimensions of musical expression including rhythm, tone, pauses and accents across a sequence of patient-therapist interactions in order to show how the dyadic logic of ...

Author: Steven H. Knoblauch

Publisher: Routledge

ISBN: 9781134900695

Category: Psychology

Page: 184

View: 778

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Such nuances and shifts in the music of a patient's voice have long been familiar to clinicians. Indeed, as Steven Knoblauch observes, the music of psychotherapy has been acknowledged across a variety of theoretical orientations, from Freudian to self-psychological to interpersonal and relational perspectives. In The Musical Edge of Therapeutic Dialogue, Knoblauch provides a model of "resonant minding" in which the musical elements of speech become a major source of information about unconscious communication and action. More specifically, resonant minding, by distinguishing between discrete and continuous levels of communication, between the verbal and the musical, offers a way of accessing and affecting levels of unconscious interactive process by attending to the musical edge of dialogue -- provided only that we can hear it. Drawing on detailed clinical vignettes, he explores shifts in embodied dimensions of musical expression including rhythm, tone, pauses and accents across a sequence of patient-therapist interactions in order to show how the dyadic logic of mutual improvisation operates at the periphery to guide the continuous flow of unconscious communication and mutual regulation. In so doing, Knoblauch provides a vivid sense of how the shifting movement of the patient's "solo performance" can be facilitated and enriched by the creative "accompaniment" of the therapist. Ultimately, Knoblauch argues, the music of therapy is not only another road to the unconscious, but one uniquely able to convey emergent meanings in a variety of domains, from conflicting cultural identifications to the experience of the body to the emergence of desire. His vision of mutual immersion in a shared "performance" aimed at fostering growth coalesces into a major contribution - at once evocative and clinically consequential - to the current movement to grasp nonverbal behavior and processes of mutual regulation as they enter into all effective psychotherapy.

The Musical Edge of Therapeutic Dialogue

In The Musical Edge of Therapeutic Dialogue, Knoblauch provides a model of “resonant minding" in which the musical elements of speech become a major source of information about unconscious communication and ...

Author: Steven H. Knoblauch

Publisher: Routledge

ISBN: 9781134900626

Category: Psychology

Page: 184

View: 682

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Such nuances and shifts in the music of a patient's voice have long been familiar to clinicians. Indeed, as Steven Knoblauch observes, the music of psychotherapy has been acknowledged across a variety of theoretical orientations, from Freudian to self-psychological to interpersonal and relational perspectives. In The Musical Edge of Therapeutic Dialogue, Knoblauch provides a model of "resonant minding" in which the musical elements of speech become a major source of information about unconscious communication and action. More specifically, resonant minding, by distinguishing between discrete and continuous levels of communication, between the verbal and the musical, offers a way of accessing and affecting levels of unconscious interactive process by attending to the musical edge of dialogue -- provided only that we can hear it. Drawing on detailed clinical vignettes, he explores shifts in embodied dimensions of musical expression including rhythm, tone, pauses and accents across a sequence of patient-therapist interactions in order to show how the dyadic logic of mutual improvisation operates at the periphery to guide the continuous flow of unconscious communication and mutual regulation. In so doing, Knoblauch provides a vivid sense of how the shifting movement of the patient's "solo performance" can be facilitated and enriched by the creative "accompaniment" of the therapist. Ultimately, Knoblauch argues, the music of therapy is not only another road to the unconscious, but one uniquely able to convey emergent meanings in a variety of domains, from conflicting cultural identifications to the experience of the body to the emergence of desire. His vision of mutual immersion in a shared "performance" aimed at fostering growth coalesces into a major contribution - at once evocative and clinically consequential - to the current movement to grasp nonverbal behavior and processes of mutual regulation as they enter into all effective psychotherapy.

Touching the Relational Edge

Couples therapy as a formative process. Journal of Couples Therapy, 10(2): 49–59. Kernberg, O. F. (1970). A psychoanalytic classification ... The Musical Edge of Therapeutic Dialogue. Hillsdale, NJ: Analytic Press. Knoblauch, S. (2005).

Author: Asaf Rolef Ben-Shahar

Publisher: Routledge

ISBN: 9780429923104

Category: Psychology

Page: 416

View: 964

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The psychotherapeutic encounter is a meeting between embodied psyches, bodies present in the room, speaking with each another, impacting and impacted by one another; bodies who are waiting for us to listen to them and dialogue with them - and speak on their behalf. The field of body psychotherapy has been exploring this embodied dialogue since the 1930s. The book "Touching the Relational Edge" delves into the history of body-psychotherapy, offering theoretical and clinical conceptualisations and insights and is rich with clinical vignettes and applicable exercise, all aimed to provide the reader with a theoretical and experiential understanding of the place of the body in psychotherapy - allowing the reader a dynamic, curious and affective engagement. The book opens a window into the cutting-edge world of relational body-psychotherapy, offering the reader a personal and professional journey into the depth of therapeutic relationship as seen through anatomical and relational eyes.

Music in Therapeutic Practice

Using Rhythm to Bridge Communication Barriers Trisha Ready ... Music grooves. Chicago: University of Chicago Press. Kestenbaum, C. J. (1986). Thoughts on the precursors of affective and ... The musical edge of therapeutic dialogue.

Author: Trisha Ready

Publisher: Rowman & Littlefield

ISBN: 9781442236219

Category: Psychology

Page: 128

View: 825

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Music in Therapeutic Practice: Using Rhythm to Bridge Communication Barriers builds upon an emerging awareness in psychotherapy that music can create therapeutic rapport with patients. Music has been described as our first language, beginning with our mother’s heartbeat. Early rhythms echo and elaborate as themes threading through the narratives of our emotional lives. Given the ways we can access and share music today, we find ourselves increasingly maneuvering through musical landscapes and constructing our identities around music. Ready illustrates how music provides alternative access to patients undergoing severe mental health issues by interweaving the psychoanalytic theories of Wilfred Bion, Daniel Stern, and others with those of ethnomusicologists, psychobiologists, and neurobiologists who believe our early urges toward music are attempts to socially bond. Theory comes to life through vivid case studies and excerpts from individual sessions and psychodynamic therapy groups. Ready also demonstrates how music can be a particularly effective communication tool with cross-cultural and young adult patients. Building music into treatment can transform the therapeutic process, making music a powerful ally to both patients and clinicians.

Music Music Therapy and Trauma

London : Hogarth Press , pp.59-68 . Knoblauch , S.H. ( 2000 ) The Musical Edge of Therapeutic Dialogue . London : Analytic Press . Lecourt , E. ( 1990 ) ' The musical envelope . ' In D.Anzieu ( ed ) Psychic Envelopes .

Author: Julie P. Sutton

Publisher: Jessica Kingsley Publishers

ISBN: 1843100274

Category: Psychology

Page: 272

View: 988

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Music communicates where words fail, and music therapy has been proven to connect with those who were thought to be unreachable, making it an ideal medium for working with those who have suffered psychological trauma. Music, Music Therapy and Trauma addresses the need for an exploration of current thinking on music and trauma. With chapters written by many of today's leading specialists in this area, music and trauma is approached from a wide range of perspectives, with contributions on the following: * neurology of trauma and music; * music and trauma in general; * social and cultural perspectives on trauma; * contextualising contemporary classical music and conflict; * music and trauma in areas where there is war, community unrest and violence (Northern Ireland, Bosnia-Herzegovina, South Africa); * music, trauma and early development. Including specific examples and case studies, this book addresses the growing interest in the effects of trauma and how music therapy can provide a way through this complex process.

Dramatic Dialogue

The musical edge of therapeutic dialogue. Hillsdale, NJ: The Analytic Press. Kohut, H. (1971). The analysis of the self. New York, NY: International Universities Press. Kristeva, J. (1982). Powers of horror: An essay on abjection.

Author: Galit Atlas

Publisher: Routledge

ISBN: 9781351368599

Category: Psychology

Page: 186

View: 687

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In Dramatic Dialogue, Atlas and Aron develop the metaphors of drama and theatre to introduce a new way of thinking about therapeutic action and therapeutic traction. This model invites the patient’s many self-states and the numerous versions of the therapist’s self onto the analytic stage to dream a mutual dream and live together the past and the future, as they appear in the present moment. The book brings together the relational emphasis on multiple self-states and enactment with the Bionian conceptions of reverie and dreaming-up the patient. The term Dramatic Dialogue originated in Ferenczi’s clinical innovations and refers to the patient and therapist dramatizing and dreaming-up the full range of their multiple selves. Along with Atlas and Aron, readers will become immersed in a Dramatic Dialogue, which the authors elaborate and enact, using the contemporary language of multiple self-states, waking dreaming, dissociation, generative enactment, and the prospective function. The book provides a rich description of contemporary clinical practice, illustrated with numerous clinical tales and detailed examination of clinical moments. Inspired by Bion’s concept of "becoming-at-one" and "at-one-ment," the authors call for a return of the soul or spirit to psychoanalysis and the generative use of the analyst’s subjectivity, including a passionate use of mind, body and soul in the pursuit of psychoanalytic truth. Dramatic Dialogue will be of great interest to all psychoanalysts and psychotherapists.

Group Music Therapy

John, D. (1992) 'Towards music psychotherapy', The Journal of British Music Therapy, 6: 12. Joseph, B. (1985) 'Transference – the total situation', ... Knoblauch, S. (2000) The musical edge of therapeutic dialogue, London: Routledge.

Author: Alison Davies

Publisher: Routledge

ISBN: 9781317618560

Category: Psychology

Page: 184

View: 225

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In Group Music Therapy Alison Davies, Eleanor Richards and Nick Barwick bring together developments in theory and clinical practice in music therapy group work, celebrating the richness of what group analytic thinking and music therapy can offer one another. The book explores the dynamic elements of the processes that take place in both group analytic therapy and group music therapy, exploring both the commonalities and the distinctive characteristics of the two modalities. To music therapists, psychotherapists and other arts therapists Group Music Therapy offers a body of knowledge and enquiry through which to understand the music therapy group process through some of the central proposals of group analysis; to group analysts it offers insight into the possibilities of non-verbal communication through improvised music and, more widely, invites thought in musical terms about the nature of events and exchanges in a therapy group. Links are made with group analytic theory as well as with other associated theoretical traditions, such as attachment theory and theories of early infant development. The book explores the history of group music therapy and the history of group analysis, looking both at core concepts and at more recent developments. Attention is also given to developmental issues, drawing upon theories of infant development and attachment theory and clinical vignettes drawn from music therapy practice with a wide range of patient groups illustrates these ideas. The book concludes with a discussion of the possibilities of co-therapy and other collaborative working and of the value of experiential groups in training. Group Music Therapy will be a key text for clinicians and students seeking to expand their theoretical thinking and enrich their practice, and offers a grounding in group analytic ideas to professionals in other disciplines considering referrals to group work.

Approaches to Psychic Trauma

“Psychodynamic Music Therapy.” Voices: A World Forum for Music Therapy 16 (2). https:/voice.no/index.php/voice/article/view/882/726. Knoblauch, Stephen H. 2000. The Musical Edge of Therapeutic Dialogue. Hillsdale, NJ: The Analytic Press ...

Author: Bernd Huppertz

Publisher: Rowman & Littlefield

ISBN: 9781442258150

Category: Psychology

Page: 524

View: 715

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This book examines the nature of treatments available for traumatized people, describing common elements, as well as those which are specific to each treatment. It presents a diversity of theories and tools for understanding how history and personalities affect the individual. Complete with case studies, it is ideal for practitioners at all levels.

Art Creativity and Psychoanalysis

Music and its promise of vitality offers a familiar embodied space ... References. Black, M. J. (2016). Making music together: Discussion of Gianni Nebbiosi«s paper, ... The musical edge of therapeutic dialogue.

Author: George Hagman

Publisher: Routledge

ISBN: 9781317510154

Category: Art

Page: 194

View: 766

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Art, Creativity, and Psychoanalysis: Perspectives from Analyst-Artists collects personal reflections by therapists who are also professional artists. It explores the relationship between art and analysis through accounts by practitioners who identify themselves as dual-profession artists and analysts. The book illustrates the numerous areas where analysis and art share common characteristics using first-hand, in-depth accounts. These vivid reports from the frontier of art and psychoanalysis shed light on the day-to-day struggle to succeed at both of these demanding professions. From the beginning of psychoanalysis, many have made comparisons between analysis and art. Recently there has been increasing interest in the relationship between artistic and psychotherapeutic practices. Most important, both professions are viewed as highly creative with spontaneity, improvisation and aesthetic experience seeming to be common to each. However, differences have also been recognized, especially regarding the differing goals of each profession: art leading to the creation of an art work, and psychoanalysis resulting in the increased welfare and happiness of the patient. These issues are addressed head-on in Art, Creativity, and Psychoanalysis: Perspectives from Analyst-Artists. The chapters consist of personal essays by analyst/artists who are currently working in both professions; each has been trained in and is currently practicing psychoanalysis or psychoanalytic psychotherapy. The goal of the book is to provide the audience with a new understanding of psychoanalytic and psychotherapeutic processes from the perspective of art and artistic creativity. Drawing on artistic material from painting, poetry, photography, music and literature, the book casts light on what the creative processes in art can add to the psychoanalytic endeavor, and vice versa. Art, Creativity, and Psychoanalysis: Perspectives from Analyst-Artists will appeal to psychoanalysts and psychoanalytic psychotherapists, theorists of art, academic artists, and anyone interested in the psychology of art.

Verbal and Non Verbal Communication in Psychotherapy

The musical edge of therapeutic dialogue. London: Analytic Press. Kornfield, J. (2008). The wise heart: Buddhist psychology for the West. London: Rider. Kuhn, T. (1970). The structure of scientific revolutions.

Author: Gill Westland

Publisher: W. W. Norton & Company

ISBN: 9780393711318

Category: Psychology

Page: 320

View: 326

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Implicit communications analyzed alongside verbal communication in therapy. Body language, facial expression, and tone of voice are key components in therapeutic interactions, but for far too long psychotherapists have dismissed them in favor of purely verbal information. In Verbal and Non-Verbal Communication in Psychotherapy, Gill Westland examines the interrelation of the verbal and the non-verbal in the context of clients and therapists working together. The physiology of communication is also discussed: from overwhelming emotions that make it difficult to speak to breath awareness that makes it easier. Therapists will be able to cultivate non-verbal communication through mindfulness practices and “right brain to right brain communication.” It is not just the client’s actions and emotions that are significant; it is important that therapists relate in a way that makes it clear to their clients that they are receptive and inviting, and Westland expertly depicts the bodily dimensions of this encounter between client and therapist. The book brings together insights from a range of psychotherapeutic traditions, including psychoanalysis, arts psychotherapies, humanistic psychotherapy, and, in particular, body psychotherapy, for clinicians who want to expand their communication abilities. Drawing on 30 years of clinical experience, and providing illustrative clinical vignettes, Westland has written a guide both for those who might not have any experience in the theory of non-verbal communications and for lifelong psychotherapy practitioners. She lays as groundwork recent research into the neurobiology of interaction and the foundations of non-verbal communication in babyhood, continuing throughout from a bodymind perspective that pays due attention to the physicality of the body. Westland urges therapists to learn how to leave their comfort zone and try new ways of helping their clients. Writing in a richly evocative, lucid language, Westland seeks to bring about change in both psychotherapist and client as they navigate both the verbal and non-verbal aspects of embodied relating.