The Forgotten Rebels of Eureka

Comprehensive and full of colour, this book will also be essential reading for devotees of Australian history.' Bookseller and Publisher 'This is a wonderful book.

Author: Clare Wright

Publisher: Text Publishing

ISBN: 9781922148407

Category: History

Page: 512

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Winner of the Stella Prize, 2014. The Eureka Stockade. It's one of Australia's foundation legends yet the story has always been told as if half the participants weren't there. But what if the hot-tempered, free-spirited gold miners we learned about at school were actually husbands and fathers, brothers and sons? What if there were women and children right there beside them, inside the Stockade, when the bullets started to fly? And how do the answers to these questions change what we thought we knew about the so-called 'birth of Australian democracy'? Who, in fact, were the midwives to that precious delivery? Ten years in the research and writing, irrepressibly bold, entertaining and often irreverent in style, Clare Wright's The Forgotten Rebels of Eureka is a fitting tribute to the unbiddable women of Ballarat - women who made Eureka a story for us all. Clare Wright is an historian who has worked as a political speechwriter, university lecturer, historical consultant and radio and television broadcaster. Her first book, Beyond the Ladies Lounge: Australia’s Female Publicans, garnered both critical and popular acclaim and her second, The Forgotten Rebels of Eureka, won the 2014 Stella Prize. She researched, wrote and presented the ABC TV documentary Utopia Girls and is the co-writer of the four-part series The War That Changed Us which screened on ABC1. 'Lively, incisive and timely, Clare Wright's account of the role of women in the Eureka Stockade is an engrossing read. Assembling a tapestry of voices that vividly illuminate the hardscrabble lives endured on Ballarat's muddy goldfields, this excellent book reveals a concealed facet of one of Australia's most famous incidences of colonial rebellion. For once, Peter Lalor isn't the hero: it's the women who are placed front and centre...The Forgotten Rebels links the actions of its heroines to the later fight for female suffrage, and will be of strong relevance to a contemporary female audience. Comprehensive and full of colour, this book will also be essential reading for devotees of Australian history.' Bookseller and Publisher 'This is a wonderful book. At last an Australian foundation story where women are not only found, but are found to have played a fundamental role.' Chris Masters 'Brilliantly researched and fun to read. An exhilarating new take on a story we thought we knew.' Brenda Niall 'Fascinating revelations. Beautifully told.' Peter FitzSimons ‘The best source on women at Eureka.’ Big Smoke

We Are the Rebels

Now here is Clare Wright's groundbreaking, award-winning study of the women who made the rebellion in an abridged edition for teenage readers.

Author: Clare Wright

Publisher: Text Publishing

ISBN: 9781925095708

Category: Juvenile Nonfiction

Page: 240

View: 381

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The Forgotten Rebels of Eureka is the most talked-about work of Australian history in recent years. Now here is Clare Wright's groundbreaking, award-winning study of the women who made the rebellion in an abridged edition for teenage readers. Front and centre are the vibrant, adventurous personalities who were players in the rebellion: Sarah Hanmer, Ellen Young, Clara Seekamp, Anastasia Hayes and Catherine Bentley, among others. But just as important were the thousands of women who lived, worked and traded on the goldfields—women who have been all but invisible until now. Discovering them changes everything. Clare Wright is a historian who has worked as a political speechwriter, university lecturer, historical consultant and radio and television broadcaster. Her first book, Beyond the Ladies Lounge: Australia’s Female Publicans, garnered both critical and popular acclaim. Her groundbreaking second book, The Forgotten Rebels of Eureka, which took ten years to research and write, won the 2014 Stella Prize. Clare researched, wrote and presented the ABC television documentaries Utopia Girls and The War that Changed Us. She lives in Melbourne with her husband and three children. ‘It’s hard not to be inspired by this feminist revisiting of gold rush history.’ CBCA Reading Time Praise for The Forgotten Rebels of Eureka ‘This is a wonderful book. At last an Australian foundation story where women are not only found, but are found to have played a fundamental role.’ Chris Masters ‘Brilliantly researched and fun to read. An exhilarating new take on a story we thought we knew.’ Brenda Niall ‘Fascinating revelations. Beautifully told.’ Peter FitzSimons ‘This is a fascinating book for teens that captures the essence of the times while never once feeling like a dry history book.’ Readings 'The Forgotten Rebels of Eureka offers us a full cast of flesh-and-blood women who belong in any telling of the Eureka story, and in any account of Australian goldfields life.' Robyn Annear, Monthly 'Clare Wright’s revisionary history of the Eureka stockade is immediately entrancing. A social history of the Ballarat goldfields in Victoria circa 1854, it recreates the landscape as one of bustling domesticity, commerce, theatre and constantly shifting authority. It is a far cry from the stories and images of my school history books which portrayed a shanty town of tents and men.' Guardian 'Extraordinary...There is so much to be learned from her prodigality of content...not just about the role of women of women in Eureka and on the goldfields...but also about Australian society.' Australian Book Review 'As Wright points out, for too long Eureka has been a masculine myth. Women's presence has never been fully explored. Indeed, their absence has been assumed. Her work fills an enormous gap. Furthermore, The Forgotten Rebels of Eureka supports her claim that women's presence does not just add colour to the picture, it changes the very outline.' Weekend Australian ‘Wright’s use of source material focusing on people, mostly women, whose stories, diaries and writings can take us through the entire journey from immigration to rebellion allows readers to connect with these characters in a way that isn’t often found in history books...Without a doubt the historical legacy of the Eureka Stockade is one which will never be forgotten but thanks in large part to the work of Clare Wright the stories of the women who almost were can stay with us.’ Salty Popcorn

You Daughters of Freedom

Clare Wright’s epic new history tells the story of that victory—and of Australia’s role in the subsequent international struggle—through the eyes of five remarkable players: the redoubtable Vida Goldstein, the flamboyant Nellie ...

Author: Clare Wright

Publisher: Text Publishing

ISBN: 9781925626896

Category: History

Page: 560

View: 722

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For the ten years from 1902, when Australia’s suffrage campaigners won the vote for white women, the world looked to this trailblazing young democracy for inspiration. Clare Wright’s epic new history tells the story of that victory—and of Australia’s role in the subsequent international struggle—through the eyes of five remarkable players: the redoubtable Vida Goldstein, the flamboyant Nellie Martel, indomitable Dora Montefiore, daring Muriel Matters, and artist Dora Meeson Coates, who painted the controversial Australian banner carried in the British suffragettes’ monster marches of 1908 and 1911. Clare Wright’s Stella Prize-winning The Forgotten Rebels of Eureka retold one of Australia’s foundation stories from a fresh new perspective. With You Daughters of Freedom she brings to life a time when Australian democracy was the envy of the world—and the standard bearer for progress in a shining new century. Dr Clare Wright is an award-winning historian and author who has worked as an academic, political speechwriter, historical consultant and radio and television broadcaster. Her most recent book, The Forgotten Rebels of Eureka, won the 2014 Stella Prize and the 2014 NIB Award for Literature and was shortlisted for many other awards. ‘You Daughters of Freedom brings some forgotten women into the public discourse again, and we are all the richer for it.’ Australian ‘A celebration of leadership, inspiration, education and sheer individual cheek.’ Sydney Morning Herald ‘Clare Wright’s You Daughters of Freedom is the uplifting story of a time Australia led the world in including women in our democratic project. It is a reminder of our proud legacy and a clarion call for who we can be.’ Penny Wong ‘The essential story of our greatest reformers, and one of our proudest achievements as a nation.’ George Megalogenis ‘A thrilling tale, superbly told, of brave Australian women with a passion for politics.’ Judith Brett ‘A rare achievement. Grand, bold and brilliantly written.’ Mark McKenna ‘This book will be brilliant.’ Annabel Crabb, Chat 10 Looks 3 ‘One of the country’s most accomplished story-tellers relates Australian women’s fight for the vote in all of its passion, intensity and drama.’ Frank Bongiorno, Professor of History, ANU ‘You Daughters of Freedom relates with sparkle and wit the largely untold story of the trailblazing women who not only dragged recalcitrant male leaders into the new century and won the right to vote but also were at the forefront of the struggle for women’s enfranchisement internationally.’ Inside Story ‘Her story of Australian suffragists winning the vote and then running for parliament in 1903 should be required reading in this time of angst over the ‘women problem’ in the federal Liberal Party.’ Weekend Australian Magazine

Migrant Cross Cultural Encounters in Asia and the Pacific

6 C. Wright, The Forgotten Rebels of Eureka (Melbourne: Text Publishing, 2013). For recent scholarship on women on the goldfields, see 'Part Three: Gold-rush Women', in L. Carpenter and L. Fraser (eds), Rushing for Gold: Life and ...

Author: Jacqueline Leckie

Publisher: Taylor & Francis

ISBN: 9781317096672

Category: Social Science

Page: 174

View: 778

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In contrast to much scholarship on cross-cultural encounters, which focuses primarily on contact between indigenous peoples and ’settlers’ or ’sojourners’, this book is concerned with migrant aspects of this phenomenon – whether migrant-migrant or migrant-host encounters – bringing together studies from a variety of perspectives on cross-cultural encounters, their past, and their resonances across the contemporary Asia-Pacific region. Organised thematically into sections focusing on ’imperial encounters’ of the nineteenth and twentieth centuries, ’identities’ in the twentieth and twenty-first centuries, and ’contemporary citizenship’ and the ways in which this is complicated by mobility and cross-cultural encounters, the volume presents studies of New Zealand, Singapore, Australia, Vanuatu, Mauritius and China to highlight key themes of mobility, intimacies, ethnicity and ’race’, heritage and diaspora, through rich evidence such as photographs, census data, the arts and interviews. Demonstrating the importance of multidisciplinary ways of looking at migrant cross-cultural encounters through blending historical and social science methodologies from a range of disciplinary backgrounds, Migrant Cross-Cultural Encounters in Asia and the Pacific will appeal to anthropologists, sociologists, cultural geographers and historians with interests in migration, mobility and cross-cultural encounters.

Larrikins Rebels and Journalistic Freedom in Australia

The Forgotten Rebels of Eureka. Melbourne: Text Publishing [2014 reprint]. Young, S. (2019). Paper Emperors: The Rise of Australia's Newspaper Empires. Sydney: UNSW Press. CHAPTER 3 Larrikin-Journalists: Federation to Appeasement ...

Author: Josie Vine

Publisher: Springer Nature

ISBN: 9783030618568

Category: Language Arts & Disciplines

Page: 245

View: 835

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Larrikins, Rebels, and Journalistic Freedom is a cultural history of Australian journalism. In a democratic nation where a free news media is not guaranteed, Australian journalism has inherited what could be described as a ‘Larrikin’ tradition to protect its independence. This book mines Australian journalism’s rebelliousness, humor and distinct disrespect for authority in various socio-historical contexts, to explore its determination to maintain professional independence. Beginning with a Larrikin analysis of Australian journalism’s inherited Enlightenment tradition, Dr Josie Vine takes the reader through the Colonial era’s hardships, Federation, two World Wars, the Cold War’s fear and suspicion, the swinging sixties, a Prime Minister’s dismissal, 1980’s neo-liberalism, post-9/11 and, finally, provides a conclusive synthesis of current Australian journalism culture. Throughout, the book highlights the audacious, iconoclastic and determined figure of the Larrikin-journalist, forever pushing boundaries to protect democracy’s cornerstone – freedom of the news media. “Book-length histories of Australian journalism are still relatively rare, but what makes this new arrival particularly welcome is the way in which it is structured around an exploration of the ‘Larrikin paradox’. This refers to the fact that although Australian journalism may profess to be ‘professional’ and ‘reputable’, it can also be raucous, unruly and disrespectful in pursuit of what it sees as its democratic purposes. The Larrikin may be a uniquely Australian figure but the paradox is far from confined to Australian journalism (not least because of the influence of erstwhile Australian Rupert Murdoch on journalism in the Anglosphere), and this book should be of considerable interest to those concerned with the means whereby journalism performs its democratic, Fourth Estate role in modern democracies. This is an extremely very well-informed and highly insightful work which ought to appeal equally to those interested in journalism and in Australian politics.” — Julian Petley, Professor, Brunel University London, UK

A Global History of Gold Rushes

Clare Wright, The Forgotten Rebels of Eureka (Melbourne: Text Publishing, 2013); Wickham, “'Blood, Sweat and Tears'.” Elizabeth Jameson has similarly shown the centrality of women in the strikes at Cripple Creek, Colorado; see Elizabeth ...

Author: Benjamin Mountford

Publisher: Univ of California Press

ISBN: 9780520967588

Category: History

Page: 336

View: 231

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Nothing set the world in motion like gold. Between the discovery of California placer gold in 1848 and the rush to Alaska fifty years later, the search for the precious yellow metal accelerated worldwide circulations of people, goods, capital, and technologies. A Global History of Gold Rushes brings together historians of the United States, Africa, Australasia, and the Pacific World to tell the rich story of these nineteenth century gold rushes from a global perspective. Gold was central to the growth of capitalism: it whetted the appetites of empire builders, mobilized the integration of global markets and economies, profoundly affected the environment, and transformed large-scale migration patterns. Together these essays tell the story of fifty years that changed the world.

Touring Performance and Global Exchange 1850 1960

The proportion of men to women remains at almost two to one throughout the gold years although at times in Ballarat, the exception, it reaches 45% women. Clare Wright, The Forgotten Rebels of Eureka (Melbourne: Text, 2013), 92, 131.

Author: Gilli Bush-Bailey

Publisher: Routledge

ISBN: 9781000509366

Category: Performing Arts

Page: 294

View: 799

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This collection uncovers connections and coincidences that challenge the old stories of pioneering performers who crossed the Atlantic and Pacific oceans from the mid-nineteenth to the mid-twentieth century. This book investigates songlines, drama, opera, music theatre, dance, and circus—removing traditional boundaries that separate studies of performance, and celebrating difference and transformation in style, intention, and delivery. Well known, or not known at all, travelling performers faced dangers at sea and hazardous journeys across land. Their tracks, made in pursuit of fortune and fame, intersected with those made by earlier storytellers in search for food. Making Tracks takes a fresh look at such tracks—the material remains—demonstrating that moving performance does far more than transfer repertoires and people; it transforms them. Touring performance has too often been conceived in diasporic terms, as a fixed product radiating out from a cultural centre. This collection maps different patterns—ones that comprise reversed flows, cross currents, and continually proliferating centres of meaning in complex networks of global exchange. This collection will be of great interest to scholars and students in theatre, music, drama studies and cultural history.

Beyond the Ladies Lounge

Handsomely illustrated and weaving oral history interviews, archival sources, folk songs, bush ballads and other popular literature throughout the narrative, this groundbreaking book exposes the remarkable visibility and dominance of women ...

Author: Clare Wright

Publisher: Text Publishing

ISBN: 9781925095517

Category: History

Page: 256

View: 449

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Clare Wright's award-winning research challenges the myth that the Australian pub is a male domain, revealing the enduring and dynamic presence of female publicans behind the bar. Wright takes the reader on a pub crawl through this history: from Sarah Bird, the 27-year-old convict who was Australia's first female licensee, to Big Poll the Grog Seller, the miners' darling on the goldfields, to Cheryl Barassi and Dawn Fraser in recent years. Handsomely illustrated and weaving oral history interviews, archival sources, folk songs, bush ballads and other popular literature throughout the narrative, this groundbreaking book exposes the remarkable visibility and dominance of women in Austalian hotel-keeping culture. Clare Wright is a historian who has worked as a political speechwriter, university lecturer, historical consultant and radio and television broadcaster. Her first book, Beyond the Ladies Lounge: Australia’s Female Publicans, garnered both critical and popular acclaim. She researched, wrote and presented the ABC television documentary Utopia Girls and co-wrote The War That Changed Us, a four-part series commemorating the centenary of WWI for ABC1. The Forgotten Rebels of Eureka won the 2014 Stella Prize. Clare lives in Melbourne with her husband and three children.

Dreamers and Schemers

See also Paul A. Pickering, '“Ripe for a Republic”: British Radical Responses to the Eureka Stockade', Australian Historical Studies, vol. 34, no. 121, 2003, pp. 69–90. 98 Clare Wright, The Forgotten Rebels of Eureka, Text Publishing, ...

Author: Frank Bongiorno

Publisher: Black Inc.

ISBN: 9781743822722

Category: History

Page: 398

View: 750

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In this compelling and comprehensive work, renowned historian Frank Bongiorno presents a social and cultural history of Australia's political life, from pre-settlement Indigenous systems to the present day. Depicting a wonderful parade of dreamers and schemers, Bongiorno surveys moments of political renewal and sheds fresh light on our democratic life. From local pubs and meeting halls to the parliament and cabinet; from pamphleteers and stump orators to party agents and operatives - this enthralling account looks at the political insiders in the halls of power, as well as the agitators and outsiders who sought to shape the nation from the margins. A work of political history like no other, Dreamers and Schemers will transform the way you look at Australian politics.

Symbols of Australia

... 50, 68; Deborah Wickham (2000) The Eureka Flag: Our Starry Banner, Ballarat Heritage Services, Ballarat, 13–17; Ballarat Times, 30 November 1854; see also Claire Wright (2013) The Forgotten Rebels of Eureka, Text, Melbourne, 381–6.

Author: Richard White

Publisher: NewSouth Publishing

ISBN: 9781742249995

Category: History

Page: 464

View: 496

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But what do they actually mean? Where do they come from? Why are some symbols so hotly contested? Does Australia have more than its fair share? Symbols of Australia offers illuminating and unexpected insights into the symbols that surround us: from Uluru to the Australian flag, the rainbow serpent to Holden cars, the democracy sausage to the Great Barrier Reef. Entertaining, provocative, informative, and often surprising, Symbols of Australia reveals a great deal about the ways nations are imagined – and how they imagine themselves. Just when we most need it, a lively reassessment of the symbols that define us and their commercial and political exploitation. A mixture of scholarly ease and irreverent playfulness that also defines us. – David Malouf, award-winning Australian writer If the nation is imagined, the business of creating its meaningful symbols gives us the very essence of its history. The star-studded cast of Symbols of Australia takes us on a fascinating tour among kangaroos and pavlovas, baggy green caps and rainbow serpents, Holden cars and vegemite jars – and much more besides. On this splendid journey across desert and beach, reef and harbour, city and bush, we see and hear the nation in its full dignity, diversity and dagginess. – Frank Bongiorno, Professor of History, Australian National University Humorous, insightful and profound, this book is a thought-provoking survey of twenty-eight of Australia’s best-known and most significant symbols. Entries range from Indigenous symbols that resonate with meaning, such as the Rainbow Serpent or Uluru, to animals and the natural world, official symbols, cultural practices, and commercial items of consumption. Most importantly, it showcases the agency of ordinary Australians and the role of popular culture in forging national identity. – Associate Professor Hsu-Ming Teo, Macquarie University Symbols of Australia, in this new revised edition, is essential reading for a sure-footed trek into our constant act of becoming ‘Australian’, sifting through the raging cacophony of opinions to distil the most pertinent elements … all while keeping a sense of humour firmly intact.– Miriam Corowa, journalist, presenter, producer and director This book is a fascinating look at the symbols that have been used to define and represent our nation. At a time when Australian identity is so contested, Symbols of Australia provides invaluable insight and context, overturning long-held assumptions and rattling revered icons. Symbols of Australia will make you re-think who we are, and where we came from. Even better, it’s a bloody good read.– Monica Dux, writer, columnist and social commentator