The Film Novelist

The book outlines a program for writing filmable novels.

Author: Dennis J. Packard

Publisher:

ISBN: 1501340484

Category: Fiction

Page:

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This is a primer on writing film novels - whether you are a beginning novelist, a seasoned writer wanting to cross over into script/novel writing, or a creative writing teacher looking for proven ways to launch new writers. The author has devised a fifteen week programme starting from a one-sentence pitch to the novel itself, which includes filming a scene from your script/novel.

The Film Club

This is a charming and poignant story about a very special time in a father and son’s relationship.

Author: David Gilmour

Publisher: Dundurn.com

ISBN: 9780887628139

Category: Biography & Autobiography

Page: 280

View: 991

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The Film Club is the true story about David Gilmour's decision to let his 15-year-old son drop out of high school on the condition that the boy agrees to watch three films a week with him. The book examines how those pivotal years changed both their lives.

The Film Novelist

6 Film novels are short – about 30,000 words – and take about as long to read as
a feature film takes to watch. The description, dialogue, and narration of a film
novel can simply be lifted out and used as the description, dialogue, and ...

Author: Dennis J. Packard

Publisher: A&C Black

ISBN: 9781441103178

Category: Language Arts & Disciplines

Page: 216

View: 320

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The book outlines a program for writing filmable novels.

Fitzgerald and the Influence of Film

This work explores the many ways in which the developing film industry of the early twentieth century influenced the writings of F. Scott Fitzgerald, focusing specifically on his novels This Side of Paradise, The Great Gatsby, Tender Is the ...

Author: Gautam Kundu

Publisher: McFarland

ISBN: 9780786431342

Category: Literary Criticism

Page: 203

View: 416

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"This work explores the ways in which the film industry of the early twentieth century influenced the writings of F. Scott Fitzgerald Early chapters examine Fitzgerald's literary adaptation of visual film techniques and aural cinematic concept within hism

The Film Novelist

A book about the history, theory, and techniques of writing short, filmable novels -- film novels.

Author: Dennis Jay Packard

Publisher: Brigham Young University Press

ISBN: 0842526080

Category:

Page:

View: 600

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A book about the history, theory, and techniques of writing short, filmable novels -- film novels.

The Nickel was for the Movies

These novels, because of their fascination with filmmaker and spectator alike, and because they anticipate current views of the questions of cinema, remain a tangible presence within the repertoire of literary modernism.

Author: Gavriel Moses

Publisher: Univ of California Press

ISBN: 0520079434

Category: Literary Criticism

Page: 335

View: 857

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The cinephobic novelist who complains to Fitzgerald's tycoon that he will never get the hang of scriptwriting wouldn't give a nickel for the movies. Yet never before the appearance of film had human perception been engaged in such an all-encompassing way by a single art form. In this ambitious investigation of a little-studied narrative genre, Gavriel Moses defines and explores "the film novel," a literary text in which cinema provides the thematic, formal, psychological, and philosophical center. Through close readings of works by the major representatives of the genre--Pirandello, Nabokov, Isherwood, West, Fitzgerald, Moravia, Percy, Puig--Moses develops a suggestive theory of novels that use literature to investigate the central role that film has acquired in human experience. These novels, because of their fascination with filmmaker and spectator alike, and because they anticipate current views of the questions of cinema, remain a tangible presence within the repertoire of literary modernism. Offering insightful discussions of Laughter in the Dark, Lancelot, Kiss of the Spider Woman, and other film novels, Moses shows the depth of the exchange between literature and cinema and illustrates the extent to which the way we tell stories with words has been affected by the movies. His book will be of wide interest to literary scholars, film historians, and students of cinema and the novel. The cinephobic novelist who complains to Fitzgerald's tycoon that he will never get the hang of scriptwriting wouldn't give a nickel for the movies. Yet never before the appearance of film had human perception been engaged in such an all-encompassing way by a single art form. In this ambitious investigation of a little-studied narrative genre, Gavriel Moses defines and explores "the film novel," a literary text in which cinema provides the thematic, formal, psychological, and philosophical center. Through close readings of works by the major representatives of the genre--Pirandello, Nabokov, Isherwood, West, Fitzgerald, Moravia, Percy, Puig--Moses develops a suggestive theory of novels that use literature to investigate the central role that film has acquired in human experience. These novels, because of their fascination with filmmaker and spectator alike, and because they anticipate current views of the questions of cinema, remain a tangible presence within the repertoire of literary modernism. Offering insightful discussions of Laughter in the Dark, Lancelot, Kiss of the Spider Woman, and other film novels, Moses shows the depth of the exchange between literature and cinema and illustrates the extent to which the way we tell stories with words has been affected by the movies. His book will be of wide interest to literary scholars, film historians, and students of cinema and the novel.

Analyzing Literature to Film Adaptations

"This is a wise and wonderful book, which among other things provides a novelist's eloquent insider's perspective on the transformation of one of her books into a film.

Author: Mary H. Snyder

Publisher: A&C Black

ISBN: 9781441168184

Category: Social Science

Page: 314

View: 487

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"This is a wise and wonderful book, which among other things provides a novelist's eloquent insider's perspective on the transformation of one of her books into a film. Thirty years ago Stanley Cavell published The World Viewed: Reflections on the Ontology of Film, which opened up an intellectual highway between philosophy and cinema. Now at long last Mary Snyder's book accomplishes a parallel clearing of the way between film making, the art of the novel, and literary and critical theory Every page is bubbling with creative, theoretical, and pedagogical insights. Her intertextual readings of a score of literature-to-film adaptations are priceless in themselves. I only wish that the title of the book had been taken from her chapter, `The Fascination Never Ends'." Michael Payne, Professor of English Emeritus, Bucknell University Critical questions specific to film adaptations need to be not only developed but established. These questions, or approaches, must be accessible to students, including those students who are not yet educationally sophisticated enough to digest purely theoretical material. Analyzing Literature-to-Film Adaptations: A Novelist's Exploration and Guide demonstrates an exploration into film adaptation from a novelist's perspective, comprising a study of literary creation as well as the process/product of adaptation and moving into the author's collaboration with a screenwriter, which ultimately becomes a journey to understand and identify the implications of literature-to-film adaptation and the complexities and problems it raises. Drawing from both classic and contemporary film adaptations (Frankenstein, The Hours, The Constant Gardener, Children of Men, The Lovely Bones, Away from Her), the book puts forth an understanding of film and film analysis, as well as addresses literary analysis. The crux of the book, however, lies in its introduction to an academic means for critical analysis of film adaptations.

The Writer on Film

Examining films about writers and acts of writing, The Writer on Film brilliantly refreshes some of the well-worn 'adaptation' debates by inviting film and literature to engage with each other trenchantly and anew – through acts of ...

Author: J. Buchanan

Publisher: Springer

ISBN: 9781137317230

Category: Performing Arts

Page: 269

View: 799

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Examining films about writers and acts of writing, The Writer on Film brilliantly refreshes some of the well-worn 'adaptation' debates by inviting film and literature to engage with each other trenchantly and anew – through acts of explicit configuration not adaptation.

The Encyclopedia of Novels Into Film

Now, The Encyclopedia of Novels into Film provides the first comprehensive look between the pages and behind the scenes of this long-standing cinematic tradition.

Author: John C. Tibbetts

Publisher:

ISBN: 081603317X

Category: Performing Arts

Page: 522

View: 839

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Contains entries for three hundred films, providing the date of release, the production company, and the director and screenwriter, and discusses the plot.

Stanley Kubrick and the Art of Adaptation

Kubrick's adaptations simplify, impose a new visuality, reduce violence, and render the moral slant more conventional. Instructors considering this book for use in a course may request an examination copy here.

Author: Greg Jenkins

Publisher: McFarland

ISBN: 9781476608846

Category: Performing Arts

Page: 181

View: 115

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Paring a novel into a two-hour film is an arduous task for even the best screenwriters and directors. Often the resulting movies are far removed from the novel, sometimes to the point of being unrecognizable. Stanley Kubrick’s adaptations have consistently been among the best Hollywood has to offer. Kubrick’s film adaptations of three novels—Lolita, The Shining and Full Metal Jacket—are analyzed in this work. The primary focus is on the alterations in the characters and narrative structure, with additional attention to style, scope, pace, mood and meaning. Kubrick’s adaptations simplify, impose a new visuality, reduce violence, and render the moral slant more conventional. Instructors considering this book for use in a course may request an examination copy here.

The Screen Writer

Now let ' s assume that those obvious things she saw were recorded by a
pedestrian cameraman , and are the film to which a film writer must add
commentary . And we ' ll say the film writer decides to put the same message into
his film , and ...

Author:

Publisher:

ISBN: STANFORD:36105027763999

Category: Authorship

Page:

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The Classic American Novel and the Movies

Fiction and Film : A Study for New Sources , ” The Saturday Review ( December
27 , 1969 ) , pp . 12 – 14 . Koszarski , Richard . ... The Age of the American Novel
: The Film Aesthetic of Fiction Between the Two Wars . Trans . by Eleanor ...

Author: Gerald Peary

Publisher: New York : F. Ungar Publishing Company

ISBN: UOM:39015003757773

Category: Performing Arts

Page: 356

View: 621

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Philip Roth, Stanley Kauffman, Ray Bradbury, and Peter Bogdanovich are among the distinguished contributors to essays that provide new insights into novels written through the 1920s and their film adaptations

The Modern American Novel and the Movies

46–56 . Munsterberg , Hugo . The Film : A Psychological Study . New York :
Dover Press , 1969 . Murray , Edward . The Cinematic Imagination : Writers and
the Motion Pictures . New York : Frederick Ungar , 1972 . Nathan , Robert . “ A
Novelist ...

Author: Gerald Peary

Publisher: Olympic Marketing Corporation

ISBN: 0804466491

Category: Performing Arts

Page: 461

View: 257

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A selection of articles by well-known writers and literature-trained, film-oriented critics illuminates the ways in which modern American novels and their film adaptations differ in characterization, scope, and ideological content

The World of Shaft

He went on to become an Academy Award winning screenwriter and respected film producer. Based on extensive research of Tidyman's personal papers, this book tells the story of Shaft from the perspective of his creator.

Author: Steve Aldous

Publisher: McFarland

ISBN: 9780786499236

Category: Performing Arts

Page: 268

View: 545

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Mention Shaft and most people think of Gordon Parks' seminal 1971 film starring Richard Roundtree in a leather coat, walking the streets of Manhattan to Isaac Hayes' iconic theme music. But the black private dick who inspired the blaxploitation film genre actually made his debut on the printed page as the creation of a white novelist. Ernest Tidyman was a seasoned journalist down on his luck when he decided to try his hand at fiction. Shaft was the result, giving Tidyman the break he was looking for. He went on to become an Academy Award winning screenwriter and respected film producer. Based on extensive research of Tidyman's personal papers, this book tells the story of Shaft from the perspective of his creator. The author provides new insight and analysis of the writing of the Shaft novels, as well as the production of the films and TV series. First-ever coverage of the forgotten Shaft newspaper comic strip includes previously unseen artwork. Also included is Shaft's recent reappearance on the printed page, in both comic book and prose form.

The Namesake

These two essays, written exclusively for this Newmarket Pictorial Moviebook, introduce an amazing panoply of images of people and places shot mainly in New York and Calcutta during the making of the movie, accented by excerpts from Lahiri ...

Author: Jhumpa Lahiri

Publisher: Newmarket Press

ISBN: 1557047316

Category: Performing Arts

Page: 144

View: 623

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Original essays and glorious photography, stunningly designed in this unique moviebook from the director of Monsoon Wedding and Vanity Fair—a Fox Searchlight release. In her essay "Writing and Film," the Pulitzer Prize-winning novelist Jhumpa Lahiri writes about the experience of seeing her novel "transposed" from paper to film. "Its essence remains, but it inhabits a different realm and must, like a transposed piece of music, conform to a different set of rules. . . . To have someone as devoted and as gifted as Mira reinvent my novel . . . has been a humbling and thrilling passage." Mira Nair's essay, "Photographs as Inspiration," begins with the provocative comment: "If it weren't for photography, I wouldn't be a filmmaker." She explains how photographs help her crystallize the visual style of her films and which particular photos influenced her vision for The Namesake. These two essays, written exclusively for this Newmarket Pictorial Moviebook, introduce an amazing panoply of images of people and places shot mainly in New York and Calcutta during the making of the movie, accented by excerpts from Lahiri's bestselling novel. Six Indian and American photographers' works are represented. Brilliantly illuminating the immigrant experience and the tangled ties between generations, The Namesake tells the story of the Ganguli family, whose move from Calcutta to New York evokes a lifelong balancing act to adapt to a new world while remembering the old. The couple's firstborn, Gogol, and sister Sonia grow up amid these divided loyalties, struggling to find their own identity without losing their heritage. Kal Penn (Harold & Kumar Go to White Castle, Superman Returns) stars as Gogol.

The Luck of the Irish 1917 1920 Film by

MacGrath had eighteen of his forty novels and three of his short stories made into films plus he wrote the story for another four movies. Three of his books were also made into Broadway plays.

Author: Harold Macgrath

Publisher: Createspace Independent Publishing Platform

ISBN: 1546515070

Category:

Page: 142

View: 872

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Harold MacGrath (September 4, 1871 - October 30, 1932) was a bestselling American novelist, short story writer, and screenwriter. Also known occasionally as Harold McGrath, he was born in Syracuse, New York. As a young man, he worked as a reporter and columnist for the Syracuse Herald newspaper until the late 1890s when he published his first novel, a romance titled Arms and the Woman. According to the New York Times, his next book, The Puppet Crown, was the No.7 bestselling book in the United States for all of 1901. MacGrath subsequently wrote novels for the mass market about love, adventure, mystery, spies, and the like at an average rate of more than one a year. He would have three more of his books that were among the top ten bestselling books of the year. At the same time, he published a number of short stories for major American magazines such as The Saturday Evening Post, Ladies Home Journal, and Red Book magazine. Several of MacGrath's novels were serialized in these magazines and contributing to them was something he would continue to do until his death in 1932. In 1912, Harold MacGrath became one of the first nationally known authors to write directly for the movies when he was hired by the American Film Company to do the screenplay for a short film in the Western genre titled The Vengeance That Failed. MacGrath had eighteen of his forty novels and three of his short stories made into films plus he wrote the story for another four movies. Three of his books were also made into Broadway plays. One of the films made from MacGrath's writings was the 1913 serial The Adventures of Kathlyn featuring Kathlyn Williams. While writing the thirteen episodes he simultaneously wrote the book that was published immediately after the December 29, 1913, premiere of the first episode of the serial so as to be in book stores during the screening of the entire thirteen episodes.Among the movies made from MacGrath's short stories was the 1920 Douglas Fairbanks Production Company's feature-length adventure film The Mollycoddle, based on MacGrath's short story with the same title that appeared in The Saturday Evening Post in 1913. Directed by Victor Fleming, it featured Fairbanks, Ruth Renick, and Wallace Beery and was distributed by the newly created company United Artists. It is said that during this same time, a young Boris Karloff, who previously had a few uncredited movie roles, chose his stage name for his first screen credit during 1920 from the MacGrath novel The Drums of Jeopardy, which had also been published by The Saturday Evening Post in January of that year and which featured a Russian mad scientist character named Boris Karlov. The name Boris Karlov was used from MacGrath's book for the 1922 Broadway play, but by 1923 with actor Boris Karloff using the similar-sounding variation, the character for the film version was renamed Gregor Karlov.