The Fiction Factory

"The Fiction Factory" by William Wallace Cook.

Author: William Wallace Cook

Publisher: Good Press

ISBN: EAN:4057664606945

Category: Fiction

Page: 130

View: 676

DOWNLOAD →

"The Fiction Factory" by William Wallace Cook. Published by Good Press. Good Press publishes a wide range of titles that encompasses every genre. From well-known classics & literary fiction and non-fiction to forgotten−or yet undiscovered gems−of world literature, we issue the books that need to be read. Each Good Press edition has been meticulously edited and formatted to boost readability for all e-readers and devices. Our goal is to produce eBooks that are user-friendly and accessible to everyone in a high-quality digital format.

The Fiction Factory

John Milton Edwards. THE FICTION FACTORY Contents of Chapters. PAGE. AUT FICTION, AUT NULLUS 11 I. The Fiction Factory: The Fiction Factory.

Author: John Milton Edwards

Publisher: The Editor Company

ISBN:

Category:

Page: 107

View: 665

DOWNLOAD →

Example in this ebook I. AUT FICTION, AUT NULLUS. "Well, my dear," said John Milton Edwards, miserably uncertain and turning to appeal to his wife, "which shall it be—to write or not to write?" "To write," was the answer, promptly and boldly, "to do nothing else but write." John Milton wanted her to say that, and yet he did not. Her conviction, orally expressed, had all the ring of true metal; yet her husband, reflecting his own inner perplexities, heard a false note suggesting the base alloy of uncertainty. "Hadn't we better think it over?" he quibbled. "You've been thinking it over for two years, John, and this month is the first time your returns from your writing have ever been more than your salary at the office. If you can be so successful when you are obliged to work nights and Sundays—and most of the time with your wits befogged by office routine—what could you not do if you spent ALL your time in your Fiction Factory?" "It may be," ventured John Milton, "that I could do better work, snatching a few precious moments from those everlasting pay-rolls, than by giving all my time and attention to my private Factory." "Is that logical?" inquired Mrs. John Milton. "I don't know, my dear, whether it's logical or not. We're dealing with a psychological mystery that has never been broken to harness. Suppose I have the whole day before me and sit down at my typewriter to write a story. Well and good. But getting squared away with a fresh sheet over the platen isn't the whole of it. The Happy Idea must be evolved. What if the Happy Idea does not come when I am ready for it? Happy Ideas, you know, have a disagreeable habit of hiding out. There's no hard and fast rule, that I am aware, for capturing a Happy Idea at just the moment it may be most in demand. There's lightning in a change of work, the sort of lightning that clears the air with a tonic of inspiration. When I'm paymastering the hardest I seem to be almost swamped with ideas for the story mill. Query: Will the mill grind out as good a grist if it grinds continuously? If I were sure—" "It stands to reason," Mrs. Edwards maintained stoutly, "that if you can make $125 a month running the mill nights and Sundays, you ought to be able to make a good deal more than that with all the week days added." "Provided," John Milton qualified, "my fountain of inspiration will flow as freely when there is nothing to hinder it as it does now when I have it turned off for twelve hours out of the twenty-four." "Why shouldn't it?" "I don't know, my dear," John Milton admitted, "unless it transpires that my inspiration isn't strong enough to be drawn on steadily." "Fudge," exclaimed Mrs. Edwards. "And then," her husband proceeded, "let us consider another phase of the question. The demand may fall off. The chances are that it WILL fall off the moment the gods become aware of the fact that I am depending on the demand for our bread and butter. Whenever a thing becomes absolutely essential to you, Fate immediately obliterates every trail that leads to it, and you go wandering desperately back and forth, getting more and more discouraged until—" "Until you drop in your tracks," broke in Mrs. Edwards, "and give up—a quitter." "Quitter" is a mean word. There's something about it that jostles you, and treads on your toes. "I don't think I'd prove a quitter," said John Milton, "even if I did get lost in a labyrinth of hard luck. It's the idea of losing you along with me that hurts." "I'll risk that." To be continue in this ebook

The Fiction Factory

William Wallace Cook. TE es FICTION FACTORY ()()illiam ()()alace Cook Lo FRABHAT THE FICTION FACTORY BY JOHN MILTON EDWARDS. Front Cover.

Author: William Wallace Cook

Publisher: Prabhat Prakashan

ISBN:

Category: Fiction

Page: 50

View: 164

DOWNLOAD →

This historic book may have numerous typos and missing text. Purchasers can usually download a free scanned copy of the original book (without typos) from the publisher. Not indexed. Not illustrated. 1912 edition. Excerpt: ... XXII. PATRONS AND PROFITS FOR TWENTY-TWO YEARS On the 20th of this month (September, 1911) it will be just twenty-two years since Edwards received payment for his first story. On Sept. 20, 1889, The Detroit Free Press sent him a check for $8. On that $8 the Fiction Factory was started. Who have been the patrons of the Factory for these twenty-two years, and what have been the returns? A vast amount of work has been necessary in order to formulate exact answers to these questions. Papers and other memoranda bearing upon the subject were widely scattered. During Edwards' travels about the country many letters and records were lost. The list that follows, therefore, is incomplete, but exact as far as it goes. More work was realized upon, by several thousands of dollars, than is here shown. For every item in the record Edwards has a letter, or a printed slip that accompanied the check, as his authority. The errors are merely those of omission. Titles of the material sold will not be given, but following the name of the publication that purchased the material will be found the year in which it was either published or paid for. Adventure, The Ridgway Company, Spring: & Macdougal Streets, New York City, 1911--1 novel ettet S 250. All-Story Magazine, The P. A. Munsey Co., 175 Fifth Ave., New York City, 1904--1 serial 225. 1905-- 2 short stories, 1 serial 255. 1906-- 2 serials 950. 1908--3 serials 1,000. American Press Association, 45 & 47 Park Place, New York City, 1905--2 short stories 30. The Argosy, F. A Munsey Co., 175 Fifth Ave., New York City, 1900--1 serial 250. 1901-- 1 serial 200. 1902-- 1 serial 260. 1903-- 1 novelette, 4 serials 1,050. 1904-- 1 short story, 1 novelette, 4 serials.. 975. 1905-- 3 serials, 1 novelette 925. 1906-- 2...

The Fiction Factory

What little success he has had with his Fiction Factory he has won by his own unaided efforts; but there were times, along at the beginning, when he could ...

Author: William Cook

Publisher: Litres

ISBN: 9785040885039

Category: Fiction

Page:

View: 126

DOWNLOAD →

Fifty Years in the Fiction Factory

Allingham referred to their new home, lightly and passingly, as his Tlittle fiction factory. He wrote, Em wrote, brothers and guests wrote – McFee stayed a ...

Author: Julia Jones

Publisher: Golden Duck UK Ltd

ISBN: 9781899262151

Category: Biography & Autobiography

Page: 390

View: 819

DOWNLOAD →

Herbert Allingham was one of 'the men who wrote for the Million'. His melodramatic serial stories ran week after week in the ha'penny papers a hundred years ago. But was he an author? He didn't think so.This biography seeks to change that. Herbert Allingham's daughters were proud of their father. They kept boxful of his stories, diaries, account books and letters from his editors. Julia Jones has used this archive to investigate the conditions of Allingham's working life and to glimpse some of his readers.

The Fiction Factory

It was in 1893 that John Milton Edwards (who sets his hand to this book of experiences and prefers using the third person to overworking the egotistical pro-noun) turned wholly to his pen as a means of liveli-hood.

Author: John Milton Edwards

Publisher:

ISBN: 9798563730021

Category:

Page: 220

View: 399

DOWNLOAD →

It was in 1893 that John Milton Edwards (who sets his hand to this book of experiences and prefers using the third person to overworking the egotistical pro-noun) turned wholly to his pen as a means of liveli-hood. In this connection, of course, the word "pen" is figurative. What he really turned to was his good friend, the Typewriter.

The Fiction Factory Classic Reprint

About the Publisher Forgotten Books publishes hundreds of thousands of rare and classic books. Find more at www.forgottenbooks.com This book is a reproduction of an important historical work.

Author: John Milton Edwards

Publisher: Forgotten Books

ISBN: 1397215704

Category:

Page: 182

View: 124

DOWNLOAD →

Excerpt from The Fiction Factory It was John Milton Edwards (who sets his hand to this book Of experiences and prefers using the third person to overworking the egotistical pronoun) turned wholly to his pen as a means of livelihood. In this connection, Of course, the word pen is figurative. What he really turned to was his good friend, the Type writer. About the Publisher Forgotten Books publishes hundreds of thousands of rare and classic books. Find more at www.forgottenbooks.com This book is a reproduction of an important historical work. Forgotten Books uses state-of-the-art technology to digitally reconstruct the work, preserving the original format whilst repairing imperfections present in the aged copy. In rare cases, an imperfection in the original, such as a blemish or missing page, may be replicated in our edition. We do, however, repair the vast majority of imperfections successfully; any imperfections that remain are intentionally left to preserve the state of such historical works.

The Fiction Factory

This Is A New Release Of The Original 1912 Edition.

Author: John Milton Edwards

Publisher:

ISBN: 1498163254

Category:

Page: 182

View: 540

DOWNLOAD →

This Is A New Release Of The Original 1912 Edition.

Fifty Years in the Fiction Factory

He was born the year of reform, 1867, when an extension of the franchise gave urgent political impetus towards compulsory education and the spread of literacy. This is a biography of his life.

Author: Julia Jones

Publisher: Golden Duck (UK) Limited

ISBN: 1899262075

Category: Authors, English

Page: 388

View: 245

DOWNLOAD →

Herbert Allingham was one of the men who wrote for the Million. He was born the year of reform, 1867, when an extension of the franchise gave urgent political impetus towards compulsory education and the spread of literacy. This is a biography of his life.

Frank Merriwell and the Fiction of All American Boyhood

Reynolds, The Fiction Factory, 121, 123. 35. the previously mentioned Comrades and Do and Dare are examples of spinoffs, as are titles like The Adventure ...

Author: Ryan K. Anderson

Publisher: University of Arkansas Press

ISBN: 9781610755719

Category: Social Science

Page: 320

View: 446

DOWNLOAD →

Gilbert Patten, writing as Burt L. Standish, made a career of generating serialized twenty-thousand-word stories featuring his fictional creation Frank Merriwell, a student athlete at Yale University who inspired others to emulate his example of manly boyhood. Patten and his publisher, Street and Smith, initially had only a general idea about what would constitute Merriwell’s adventures and who would want to read about them when they introduced the hero in the dime novel Tip Top Weekly in 1896, but over the years what took shape was a story line that capitalized on middle-class fears about the insidious influence of modern life on the nation’s boys. Merriwell came to symbolize the Progressive Era debate about how sport and school made boys into men. The saga featured the attractive Merriwell distinguishing between “good” and “bad” girls and focused on his squeaky-clean adventures in physical development and mentorship. By the serial’s conclusion, Merriwell had opened a school for “weak and wayward boys” that made him into a figure who taught readers how to approximate his example. In Frank Merriwell and the Fiction of All-American Boyhood, Anderson treats Tip Top Weekly as a historical artifact, supplementing his reading of its text, illustrations, reader letters, and advertisements with his use of editorial correspondence, memoirs, trade journals, and legal documents. Anderson blends social and cultural history, with the history of business, gender, and sport, along with a general examination of childhood and youth in this fascinating study of how a fictional character was used to promote a homogeneous “normal” American boyhood rooted in an assumed pecking order of class, race, and gender.