Culture of Letter Writing in Pre Modern Islamic Society

This book offers a unique analysis of letter-writing, focusing on the notion of the power of the pen. The author looks at the wider context of epistolography, relating it to the power structures of Islamic society in that period.

Author: Adrian Gully

Publisher: Edinburgh University Press

ISBN: 9780748633746

Category: Literary Criticism

Page: 232

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The Culture of Letter-Writing in Pre-Modern Islamic Society received an honourable mention from the British-Kuwait Friendship Society at BRISMES 2009Writing letters was an important component of intellectual life in the Middle Islamic period, telling us much about the cultural history of pre-modern Islamic society. This book offers a unique analysis of letter-writing, focusing on the notion of the power of the pen. The author looks at the wider context of epistolography, relating it to the power structures of Islamic society in that period. He also attempts to identify some of the similarities and differences between Muslim modes of letter-writing and those of western cultures.One of the strengths of this book is that it is based on a wide range of primary Arabic sources, thus reflecting the broader epistemological importance of letter-writing in Islamic society.

Reading Culture and Writing Practices in Nineteenth century France

From the 1830s on, book production experienced an industrial revolution which led to the emergence of a mass literary culture by the close of the century. At the same time, the western world acquired mass literacy.

Author: Martyn Lyons

Publisher: University of Toronto Press

ISBN: 9780802093578

Category: History

Page: 245

View: 421

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Between about 1830 and the outbreak of the First World War, print culture, reading, and writing transformed cultural life in Western Europe in many significant ways. Book production and consumption increased dramatically, and practices such as letter- and diary-writing were widespread. This study demonstrates the importance of the nineteenth century in French cultural change and illustrates the changing priorities and concerns of l'histoire du livre since the 1970s. From the 1830s on, book production experienced an industrial revolution which led to the emergence of a mass literary culture by the close of the century. At the same time, the western world acquired mass literacy. New categories of readers became part of the reading public while western society also learned to write. Reading Culture and Writing Practices in Nineteenth-Century France examines how the concerns of historians have shifted from a search for statistical sources to more qualitative assessments of readers' responses. Martyn Lyons argues that autobiographical sources are vitally important to this investigation and he considers examples of the intimate and everyday writings of ordinary people. Featuring original and intriguing insights as well as references to material hitherto inaccessible to English readers, this study presents a form of 'history from below' with emphasis on the individual reader and writer, and his or her experiences and perceptions.

Reading Culture Writing Practices in Nineteenth Century France

1 Letter-Writing and the Private Journal Current approaches focus not on the contents of private correspondence but on letters as cultural artefacts.2 They analyse the geography of letter writing and reception, the frequency of letter ...

Author: Martyn Lyons

Publisher: University of Toronto Press

ISBN: 9781442692039

Category: History

Page: 272

View: 749

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Between about 1830 and the outbreak of the First World War, print culture, reading, and writing transformed cultural life in Western Europe in many significant ways. Book production and consumption increased dramatically, and practices such as letter- and diary-writing were widespread. This study demonstrates the importance of the nineteenth century in French cultural change and illustrates the changing priorities and concerns of l'histoire du livre since the 1970s. From the 1830s on, book production experienced an industrial revolution which led to the emergence of a mass literary culture by the close of the century. At the same time, the western world acquired mass literacy. New categories of readers became part of the reading public while western society also learned to write. Reading Culture and Writing Practices in Nineteenth-Century France examines how the concerns of historians have shifted from a search for statistical sources to more qualitative assessments of readers' responses. Martyn Lyons argues that autobiographical sources are vitally important to this investigation and he considers examples of the intimate and everyday writings of ordinary people. Featuring original and intriguing insights as well as references to material hitherto inaccessible to English readers, this study presents a form of 'history from below' with emphasis on the individual reader and writer, and his or her experiences and perceptions.

Eloquent Obsessions

Out of the core of experience, these essays began as obsessions.

Author: Marianna Torgovnick

Publisher: Duke University Press

ISBN: 082231472X

Category: Social Science

Page: 292

View: 427

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Out of the core of experience, these essays began as obsessions. Whether founded in some strongly lived moment, deeply held conviction, long-term interest, or persistent and unanswered question, these essays reveal the writer’s voice—personal, often passionate, full of conviction, certainly unmistakable. Marianna Torgovnick has drawn together writings by leading contemporary scholars in the humanities, representing fields of literary criticism, American and Romance studies, anthropology, and art history. Eloquent Obsessions presents cultural criticism at its thoughtful and writerly best. This collection explores a wide range of issues at the intersection of personal and social history—from growing up in the South to exploring a love for France or Japan, from coming of age as a feminist to mapping the history of National Geographic, from examining the cultural "we" to diagnosing class structures in Israel or showing how photography deals with AIDS. The authors here bring writerly genres—autobiography, memoir, or travel narrative—to intellectual tasks such as textual readings or investigating the histories of institutions. Continuing a tradition of cultural criticism established by writers such as Samuel Johnson, Zora Neale Hurston, Edmund Wilson, Hannah Arendt, or Raymond Williams, these essays seek to make a difference, to have an impact, and are based on the fundamental premise that writers have something to say about society. Simply put, this collection offers models for writing eloquently about culture—models that are intellectually and socially responsible, but attuned to the critic’s voice and the reader’s ear. Aimed not just at academics but also at a more general audience alive to the concerns and interests of society today, Eloquent Obsessions, a revised and expanded version of a special issue of South Atlantic Quarterly (Winter 1992), will extend beyond the academy contemporary ways of writing about culture. Contributors. Jane Collins, Cathy N. Davidson, Virginia R. Dominguez, Mark Edmundson, Gerald Graff, Richard Inglis, Aldona Jonaitis, Alice Yaeger Kaplan, Catherine Lutz, Nancy K. Miller, Linda Orr, Andrew Ross, Henry M. Sayre, Jane Tompkins, Marianna Torgovnick

The Writer s Craft the Culture s Technology

These essays, from an international array of experts, are stylistics-based but not stylistics-bound.

Author:

Publisher: BRILL

ISBN: 9789401202640

Category: Social Science

Page: 284

View: 536

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The Writer’s Craft, the Culture’s Technology explores the multiple ways in which a culture’s technological resources shape its literary productions. Literature and style cannot be divorced from the particular technologised culture that sponsors them. This has always been true, as papers here on literature from earlier periods show. But many of the papers focus on contemporary culture, where literature vies for attention with film, the internet, and other multimodal cultural forms. These essays, from an international array of experts, are stylistics-based but not stylistics-bound. They should be of interest to all who are interested in discourse analytic commentaries on how technological horizons, as always, continue to shape the forms and functions of literature and other cultural productions.

Writing Culture and Cultures of Writing Think Gobal Thinkpiece Series

In this Thinkpiece, the author, who is a Fulbright Teaching Assistant, examines what it really means to have mutual cultural exchange.

Author: Lindsey Appell

Publisher:

ISBN: OCLC:1066485331

Category:

Page: 6

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In this Thinkpiece, the author, who is a Fulbright Teaching Assistant, examines what it really means to have mutual cultural exchange. She reflects on her experience as an American working in a university in Bucharest. In this paper she describes how some of her assumptions about academic life were challenged, and how being open to these challenges, and embracing the unexpected, helped her experience deep cultural change--and a richer international experience as a result.

Participatory Composition

In this innovative volume, Sarah J. Arroyo argues for a “participatory composition,” inspired by the culture of online video sharing and framed by theorist Gregory Ulmer’s concept of electracy.

Author: Sarah J. Arroyo

Publisher: SIU Press

ISBN: 9780809331475

Category: Language Arts & Disciplines

Page: 169

View: 873

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Like. Share. Comment. Subscribe. Embed. Upload. Check in. The commands of the modern online world relentlessly prompt participation and encourage collaboration, connecting people in ways not possible even five years ago. This connectedness no doubt influences college writing courses in both form and content, creating possibilities for investigating new forms of writing and student participation. In this innovative volume, Sarah J. Arroyo argues for a “participatory composition,” inspired by the culture of online video sharing and framed by theorist Gregory Ulmer’s concept of electracy. Electracy, according to Ulmer, “is to digital media what literacy is to alphabetic writing.” Although electracy can be compared to digital literacy, it is not something shut on and off with the power buttons on computers or mobile devices. Rather, electracy encompasses the cultural, institutional, pedagogical, and ideological implications inherent in the transition from a culture of print literacy to a culture saturated with electronic media, regardless of the presence of actual machines. Arroyo explores the apparatus of electracy in many of its manifestations while focusing on the participatory practices found in online video culture, particularly on YouTube. Chapters are devoted to questions of subjectivity, definition, authorship, and pedagogy. Utilizing theory and incorporating practical examples from YouTube, classrooms, and other social sites, Arroyo presents accessible and practical approaches for writing instruction. Additionally, she outlines the concept of participatory composition by highlighting how it manifests in online video culture, offers student examples of engagement with the concept, and advocates participatory approaches throughout the book. Arroyo presents accessible and practical possibilities for teaching and learning that will benefit scholars of rhetoric and composition, media studies, and anyone interested in the cultural and instructional implications of the digital age.

Writing Across Cultures

Originally published in 1982, the book links Rama's work on Spanish American modernism with his arguments about the innovative nature of regionalist literature, and it foregrounds his thinking about the close relationship between literary ...

Author: Angel Rama

Publisher: Duke University Press

ISBN: 9780822352938

Category: History

Page: 243

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Ángel Rama was one of twentieth-century Latin America's most distinguished men of letters. Writing across Cultures is his comprehensive analysis of the varied sources of Latin American literature. Originally published in 1982, the book links Rama's work on Spanish American modernism with his arguments about the innovative nature of regionalist literature, and it foregrounds his thinking about the close relationship between literary movements, such as modernism or regionalism, and global trends in social and economic development. In Writing across Cultures, Rama extends the Cuban anthropologist Fernando Ortiz's theory of transculturation far beyond Cuba, bringing it to bear on regional cultures across Latin America, where new cultural arrangements have been forming among indigenous, African, and European societies for the better part of five centuries. Rama applies this concept to the work of the Peruvian novelist, poet, and anthropologist José María Arguedas, whose writing drew on both Spanish and Quechua, Peru's two major languages and, by extension, cultures. Rama considered Arguedas's novel Los ríos profundos (Deep Rivers) to be the most accomplished example of narrative transculturation in Latin America. Writing across Cultures is the second of Rama's books to be translated into English.

Writing Society and Culture in Early Rus c 950 1300

Just as it is possible to read a language without being able to speak it, so it is possible to write without being able to ... in the technical sense may nevertheless be branded – or confess to being – illiterate in the cultural sense.

Author: Simon Franklin

Publisher: Cambridge University Press

ISBN: 9781139434546

Category: History

Page:

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This book provides a thorough survey and analysis of the emergence and functions of written culture in Rus (covering roughly the modern East Slav lands of European Russia, Ukraine and Belarus). Part I introduces the full range of types of writing: the scripts and languages, the materials, the social and physical contexts, ranging from builders' scratches on bricks through to luxurious parchment manuscripts. Part II presents a series of thematic studies of the 'socio-cultural dynamics' of writing, in order to reveal and explain distinctive features in the Rus assimilation of the technology. The comparative approach means that the book may also serve as a case-study for those with a broader interest either in medieval uses of writing or in the social and cultural history of information technologies. Overall, the impressive scholarship and idiosyncratic wit of this volume commend it to students and specialists in Russian history and literature alike. Awarded the Alec Nove Prize, given by the British Association for Slavonic and East European Studies for the best book of 2002 in Russian, Soviet or Post-Soviet studies.

Writing Culture

First, it is no longer possible to act as if the outside researcher is the sole, or primary, bringer of the culture into writing. This has, in fact, seldom been the case. However, there has been a consistent tendency among fieldworkers ...

Author: James Clifford

Publisher: Univ of California Press

ISBN: 9780520266025

Category: Social Science

Page: 305

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Collection of essays on ethnography

Travel Writing Visual Culture and Form 1760 1900

As Bennett relates, the persistence of Keats's presence in Victorian culture was nurtured by the writing of his friend and deathbed nurse Joseph Severn. And the transposition of a debate about the cultural importance of poetry to a ...

Author: Brian H. Murray

Publisher: Springer

ISBN: 9781137543394

Category: Literary Criticism

Page: 248

View: 717

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This collection reveals the variety of literary forms and visual media through which travel records were conveyed in the long nineteenth century, bringing together a group of leading researchers from a range of disciplines to explore the relationship between travel writing, visual representation and formal innovation.

Women Writing and the Reproduction of Culture in Tudor and Stuart Britain

Feminist cultural studies scholars have argued that women , as participants in culture who remain resistant to the hegemony , must then negotiate their relationship with it , changing culture as a result . Christine Gledhill , writing ...

Author: Mary Burke

Publisher: Syracuse University Press

ISBN: 0815628153

Category: Literary Criticism

Page: 336

View: 443

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Through the lens of cultural studies, 14 essays explore the way that women writers attempted to use their writings and their personal relationships to fashion gender roles and other political cultural issues of their time. The contributions are organized into sections on women's material culture, women as agents in reproducing culture, popular culture and women's pamphlets, and women's bodies as inscriptions of culture. Specific topics include Lady Mary Wroth's anti-absolutist sonnets, characterizations of class in Pembroke's psalms, and the assimilation of female saints into reformation England. Annotation copyrighted by Book News, Inc., Portland, OR

Beyond Writing Culture

After Writing Culture Beyond eliciting immediate reactions , Writing Culture also influenced , albeit in a more mediated manner , other important developments in anthropology . A brief and fragmentary elaboration of a few of these ...

Author: Karsten Kumoll

Publisher: Berghahn Books

ISBN: 1845456750

Category: Social Science

Page: 245

View: 690

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"This is a book that will attract a great deal of attention among anthropologists and social scientists in general. It is a great advance on earlier critiques of Writing Culture (1986) that have emerged at intervals, a large number of them cited by the contributors. Its strength lies particularly in its transdisciplinary perspectives and the clarity of both critique and new representations. The prologue is a tour de force." * Joan Vincent, Professor Emerita, Barnard College/Columbia University Two decades after the publication of Clifford and Marcus' volume Writing Culture, this collection provides a fresh and diverse reassessment of the debates that this pioneering volume unleashed. At the same time, Beyond Writing Culture moves the debate on by embracing the more fundamental challenge as to how to conceptualise the intricate relationship between epistemology and representational practices rather than maintaining the original narrow focus on textual analysis. It thus offers a thought-provoking tapestry of new ideas relevant for scholars not only concerned with 'the ethnographic Other', but with representation in general. Olaf Zenker is Assistant Professor in Social Anthropology at the University of Bern, Switzerland. He did his Ph.D. at the Max Planck Institute for Social Anthropology in Halle on the Irish language and identity in Catholic West Belfast. His publications focus on conflict and identity formations, including a study on communicative constructions of group membership among homeless people:Techniken zur kommunikativen Herstellung von Gruppenzugehorigkeit (Berlin, 2004). Karsten Kumoll is Programme Manager at the German Council of Science and Humanities (Wissenschaftsrat), advising the Federal and State (Lander) governments on the system of higher education and research. He obtained his Ph.D. in sociology from the University of Freiburg. Its subject was Marshall Sahlins' complete works and it was subsequently published as: Kultur, Geschichte und die Indigenisierung der Moderne: Eine Analyse des Gesamtwerks von Marshall Sahlins (Bielefeld, 2007).

Media Journal

The authors have organized the book by asking readers to do three things: to keep media journals in which they reflect on the uses they make of the voices and images of popular culture, to read and respond to the work of other media critics ...

Author: Joseph D. Harris

Publisher: Simon & Schuster Books For Young Readers

ISBN: 0023505850

Category: Feature writing

Page: 462

View: 915

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There is a major distinction between those who absorb media images as spectators, and those who absorb them as commentators. Responding to images as a journalist, broadcaster, essayist, or critic, requires keen precision and a unique originality. In today's media-saturated environment, the only way to be heard over the din of all the other news reports and commentaries is to write and respond in a manner that is fresh and inviting. MEDIA JOURNAL is a reader containing 40 selections focusing on cultural studies, the media and popular culture. The authors have organized the book by asking readers to do three things: to keep media journals in which they reflect on the uses they make of the voices and images of popular culture, to read and respond to the work of other media critics, and to try their hands at writing media criticism themselves. Readings are drawn from a wide range of writings, and are selected for their liveliness, contemporaneity, and insight. Updated readings better address the diverse media culture of the 1990s. Each reading selection is followed by: "Coming to Terms"--understanding the author in one's own words; "Reading as a Writer"--looking at style and strategy; and "Writing Criticism"--making an author's words and ideas a source for one's own writing. Journalists, writers, cultural historians, critics, philosophers, and anyone interested in popular culture, the media, and cultural studies.

Culture Diaspora and Modernity in Muslim Writing

This volume considers literary fiction by Muslim writers, dealing with the interaction of Muslim and non-Muslim cultures and exploring liberal orthodoxies such as secularism and multiculturalism.

Author: Rehana Ahmed

Publisher: Routledge

ISBN: 9780415896771

Category: Literary Criticism

Page: 241

View: 601

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Fiction by writers of Muslim background forms one of the most diverse, vibrant and high-profile corpora of work being produced today - from the trail-blazing writing of Salman Rushdie and Hanif Kureishi, which challenged political and racial orthodoxies in the 1980s, to that of a new generation including Mohsin Hamid, Nadeem Aslam and Kamila Shamsie. This collection reflects the variety of those fictions. Experts in English, South Asian, and postcolonial literatures address the nature of Muslim identity: its response to political realignments since the 1980s, its tensions between religious and secular models of citizenship, and its manifestation of these tensions as conflict between generations. In considering the perceptions of Muslims, contributors also explore the roles of immigration, class, gender, and national identity, as well as the impact of 9/11. This volume includes essays on contemporary fiction by writers of Muslim origin and non-Muslims writing about Muslims. It aims to push beyond the habitual populist 'framing' of Muslims as strangers or interlopers whose ways and beliefs are at odds with those of modernity, exposing the hide-bound, conservative assumptions that underpin such perspectives. While returning to themes that are of particular significance to diasporic Muslim cultures, such as secularism, modernity, multiculturalism and citizenship, the essays reveal that 'Muslim writing' grapples with the same big questions as serve to exercise all writers and intellectuals at the present time: How does one reconcile the impulses of the individual with the requirements of community? How can one 'belong' in the modern world? What is the role of art in making sense of chaotic contemporary experience?

The World is a Text Writing About Visual and Popular Culture

You may ask yourself what scholarly writing could possibly exist about Barbie dolls or The Big Bang Theory. Or you may not have written a paper that engages popular culture as a research topic. After all, is not research about “serious” ...

Author: Jonathan Silverman

Publisher: Broadview Press

ISBN: 9781770486850

Category: Language Arts & Disciplines

Page: 300

View: 105

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Wherever we look today, popular culture greets us with “texts” that make implicit arguments; this book helps students to think and write critically about these texts. The World Is a Text teaches critical reading, writing, and argument in the context of pop-culture and visual examples, showing students how to “read” everyday objects and visual texts with basic semiotics. The book shows how texts of all kinds, from a painting to a university building to a pair of sneakers, make complex arguments through their use of signs and symbols, and shows students how to make these arguments in their own essays. This new edition is rich with images, real-world examples, writing and discussion prompts, and examples of academic and student writing. The first part of the book is a rhetoric covering argumentation, research, the writing process, and adapting from high-school to college writing, while the second part explores writing about specific cultural topics. Notes, instruction, and advice about research are woven into the text, with research instruction closely tied to the topic being discussed. New to the updated compact edition are chapters on fashion, sports, and nature and the environment.

Postal Culture Reading and Writing Letters in Post Unification Italy

the letter as a crucial instrument in fostering this exchange of information through which a sense of belonging (to a community of writers and readers) is created by way of engaging both reader and writer in a shared interpretive and ...

Author: Gabriella Romani

Publisher: University of Toronto Press

ISBN: 9781442647084

Category: Biography & Autobiography

Page: 272

View: 583

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Appendix includes letters transcribed from Italian newspapers.

Culture Writing

Finally, I conclude Culture Writing with an afterword on two later literary responses to the cultural turn of the period of decolonization. Amitav Ghosh, like Laura Bohannan an Oxford-trained non-British anthropologist, follows Bohannan ...

Author: Tim Watson

Publisher: Oxford University Press

ISBN: 9780190852696

Category: Literary Criticism

Page: 256

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Focusing on the 1950s and early 1960s, Culture Writing argues that this period in Britain, the United States, France, and the Caribbean was characterized by dynamic exchanges between literary writers and anthropologists on both sides of the Atlantic. As the British and French empires collapsed and the United States rose to global power in the early Cold War, and as intellectuals from the decolonizing world challenged the cultural hegemony of the West, some anthropologists began to assess their discipline's complicity with empire and experimented with literary forms and technique. Culture Writing shows that the "literary turn" in anthropology took place earlier than has conventionally been assumed, in the 1950s rather than the 1970s and 80s. Simultaneously, some literary writers reacted to the end of the period of modernist experimentation by turning to ethnographic methods for representing the people and cultural practices of Britain, France, and the United States, bringing anthropology back home. There is analysis of literary writers who had a significant professional engagement with anthropology and brought some of its techniques and research questions into literary composition: Barbara Pym (Britain), Ursula Le Guin and Saul Bellow (United States), Édouard Glissant (Martinique), and Michel Leiris (France). On the side of ethnography, the book analyzes works by anthropologists who either explicitly or surreptitiously adopted literary forms for their writing about culture: Laura Bohannan (United States), Michel Leiris and Claude Lévi-Strauss (France), and Mary Douglas (Britain). Culture Writing concludes with an epilogue that shows how the literature-anthropology conversation continues into the postcolonial period in the work of Indian author-anthropologist Amitav Ghosh and Jamaican author-sociologist Erna Brodber.

The Cradle of Culture and What Children Know About Writing and Numbers Before Being

Here, however, I am suggesting that this natural propensity also can apply to such culturalobjects as writingand numerals, the functioning of which is strictly conventional. Human beings create these representational objects,but only ...

Author: Liliana Tolchinsky

Publisher: Psychology Press

ISBN: 9781135648008

Category: Psychology

Page: 296

View: 778

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This book provides a thrilling description of preliterate children's developing ideas about writing and numerals, and it illustrates well the many ways in which cultural artifacts influence the mind and vice versa. Remarkably, children treat writing and numerals as distinct even before they have received any formal training on the topic, and well before they learn how to use writing to represent messages and numerals to represent quantities. In this revolutionary new book, Liliana Tolchinsky argues that preliterate children's experiences with writing and numerals play an essential and previously unsuspected role in children's subsequent development. In this view, learning notations, such as writing is not just a matter of acquiring new instruments for communicating existing knowledge. Rather, there is a continual interaction between children's understanding of the features of a notational system and their understanding of the corresponding domain of knowledge. The acquisition of an alphabetic writing system transforms children's view of language, and the acquisition of a formal system of enumeration transforms children's understanding of numbers. Written in an engaging narrative style, and richly illustrated with historical examples, case studies, and charming descriptions of children's behavior, this book is aimed not only at cognitive scientists, but also at educators, parents, and anyone interested in how children develop in a cultural context.

The Writing Culture of Ordinary People in Europe C 1860 1920

universal literacy, in which different societies took specific paths towards a situation in which over ninety per cent of the population could read and write. The route each country took was different and the pace at which literacy ...

Author: Martyn Lyons

Publisher: Cambridge University Press

ISBN: 9781107018891

Category: History

Page: 278

View: 724

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A fascinating account of how ordinary people met the challenges of literacy in modern Europe, as distances between people increased.