The Animal that Therefore I Am

The Animal That Therefore I Am is the long-awaited translation of the complete text of Jacques Derrida's ten-hour address to the 1997 Cérisy conference entitled "The Autobiographical Animal," the third of four such colloquia on his work.

Author: Jacques Derrida

Publisher: Perspectives in Continental Ph

ISBN: 082322791X

Category: Philosophy

Page: 176

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The Animal That Therefore I Am is the long-awaited translation of the complete text of Jacques Derrida's ten-hour address to the 1997 Cérisy conference entitled "The Autobiographical Animal," the third of four such colloquia on his work. The book was assembled posthumously on the basis of two published sections, one written and recorded session, and one informal recorded session. The book is at once an affectionate look back over the multiple roles played by animals in Derrida's work and a profound philosophical investigation and critique of the relegation of animal life that takes place as a result of the distinction--dating from Descartes--between man as thinking animal and every other living species. That starts with the very fact of the line of separation drawn between the human and the millions of other species that are reduced to a single "the animal." Derrida finds that distinction, or versions of it, surfacing in thinkers as far apart as Descartes, Kant, Heidegger, Lacan, and Levinas, and he dedicates extended analyses to the question in the work of each of them. The book's autobiographical theme intersects with its philosophical analysis through the figures of looking and nakedness, staged in terms of Derrida's experience when his cat follows him into the bathroom in the morning. In a classic deconstructive reversal, Derrida asks what this animal sees and thinks when it sees this naked man. Yet the experiences of nakedness and shame also lead all the way back into the mythologies of "man's dominion over the beasts" and trace a history of how man has systematically displaced onto the animal his own failings or bêtises. The Animal That Therefore I Am is at times a militant plea and indictment regarding, especially, the modern industrialized treatment of animals. However, Derrida cannot subscribe to a simplistic version of animal rights that fails to follow through, in all its implications, the questions and definitions of "life" to which he returned in much of his later work.

The Animal That Therefore I Am

The translated, complete text of Derrida’s 1997 ten-hour address, “The Autobiographical Animal,” focusing on the industrialized treatment of animals.

Author: Jacques Derrida

Publisher: Fordham Univ Press

ISBN: 9780823227921

Category: Philosophy

Page: 323

View: 980

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The translated, complete text of Derrida’s 1997 ten-hour address, “The Autobiographical Animal,” focusing on the industrialized treatment of animals. The Animal That Therefore I Am is at once an affectionate look back over the multiple roles played by animals in Derrida’s work and a profound philosophical investigation and critique of the relegation of animal life that takes place as a result of the distinction?dating from Descartes?between man as thinking animal and every other living species. That starts with the very fact of the line of separation drawn between the human and the millions of other species that are reduced to a single “the animal.” Derrida finds that distinction, or versions of it, surfacing in thinkers as far apart as Descartes, Kant, Heidegger, Lacan, and Levinas, and he dedicates extended analyses to the question in the work of each of them. The book’s autobiographical theme intersects with its philosophical analysis through the figures of looking and nakedness, staged in terms of Derrida’s experience when his cat follows him into the bathroom in the morning. In a classic deconstructive reversal, Derrida asks what this animal sees and thinks when it sees this naked man. Yet the experiences of nakedness and shame also lead all the way back into the mythologies of “man’s dominion over the beasts” and trace a history of how man has systematically displaced onto the animal his own failings or bêtises. The Animal That Therefore I Am is at times a militant plea and indictment regarding, especially, the modern industrialized treatment of animals. However, Derrida cannot subscribe to a simplistic version of animal rights that fails to follow through, in all its implications, the questions and definitions of “life” to which he returned in much of his later work.

The Animal that Therefore I Am

The animal in whose tracks therefore I am (following), and who picks up traces, who is it? Does it speak? Does it speak French? Imagine it signing a declaration, one trace among others, in the first person, je, je suis.

Author: Jacques Derrida

Publisher: Fordham Univ Press

ISBN: 9780823227907

Category: Philosophy

Page: 176

View: 971

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The Animal That Therefore I Am is the long-awaited translation of the complete text of Jacques Derrida's ten-hour address to the 1997 Cérisy conference entitled "The Autobiographical Animal," the third of four such colloquia on his work. The book was assembled posthumously on the basis of two published sections, one written and recorded session, and one informal recorded session. The book is at once an affectionate look back over the multiple roles played by animals in Derrida's work and a profound philosophical investigation and critique of the relegation of animal life that takes place as a result of the distinction--dating from Descartes--between man as thinking animal and every other living species. That starts with the very fact of the line of separation drawn between the human and the millions of other species that are reduced to a single "the animal." Derrida finds that distinction, or versions of it, surfacing in thinkers as far apart as Descartes, Kant, Heidegger, Lacan, and Levinas, and he dedicates extended analyses to the question in the work of each of them. The book's autobiographical theme intersects with its philosophical analysis through the figures of looking and nakedness, staged in terms of Derrida's experience when his cat follows him into the bathroom in the morning. In a classic deconstructive reversal, Derrida asks what this animal sees and thinks when it sees this naked man. Yet the experiences of nakedness and shame also lead all the way back into the mythologies of "man's dominion over the beasts" and trace a history of how man has systematically displaced onto the animal his own failings or bêtises. The Animal That Therefore I Am is at times a militant plea and indictment regarding, especially, the modern industrialized treatment of animals. However, Derrida cannot subscribe to a simplistic version of animal rights that fails to follow through, in all its implications, the questions and definitions of "life" to which he returned in much of his later work.

In the Name of Phenomenology

110 Derrida, Of Grammatology, p. 70. 111 Glendinning, Arguing with Derrida, p. 108. 112 Diamond, 'Eating Meat and Eating People', p. 324. 113 Derrida, 'The Animal that Therefore I Am (More to Follow)', Critical Inquiry, vol.

Author: Simon Glendinning

Publisher: Routledge

ISBN: 9781134594696

Category: Philosophy

Page: 281

View: 866

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Phenomenology is one of the twentieth century?s most important philosophical movements. It is also attracting renewed interest from philosophers working within the?analytic? tradition, often thought to be at odds with phenomenology. In this bold and controversial book, Simon Glendinning explores some fundamental questions about phenomenology that are frequently overlooked, including:.:.; To what extent is phenomenology a coherent school?.; If it shares some methods and problems with analytic philosophy and continental philosophy, what makes it philosophically distinctive?.; Should phenomenolo.

Understanding Derrida Understanding Modernism

76 Derrida, The Animal That Therefore I Am, 14. 77 Derrida, “On Reading Heidegger,” 173. 78 Derrida, The Animal That Therefore I Am, 111. 79 Derrida, The Animal That Therefore I Am, 113. But for a comparative discussion of Levinas and ...

Author: Jean-Michel Rabaté

Publisher: Bloomsbury Publishing USA

ISBN: 9781501331879

Category: Literary Criticism

Page: 348

View: 919

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This volume makes a significant contribution to both the study of Derrida and of modernist studies. The contributors argue, first, that deconstruction is not “modern”; neither is it “postmodern” nor simply “modernist.” They also posit that deconstruction is intimately connected with literature, not because deconstruction would be a literary way of doing philosophy, but because literature stands out as a “modern” notion. The contributors investigate the nature and depth of Derrida's affinities with writers such as Joyce, Kafka, Antonin Artaud, Georges Bataille, Paul Celan, Maurice Blanchot, Theodor Adorno, Samuel Beckett, and Walter Benjamin, among others. With its strong connection between philosophy and literary modernism, this highly original volume advances modernist literary study and the relationship of literature and philosophy.

Animal Writing

Derrida, The Animal That Therefore I Am, p. 2. There is also a connection between animals and Derrida's individual sense of autobiography: 'animals [. ..] show up each time Derrida's discourse shifts to an autobiographical mode'.

Author: Danielle Sands

Publisher: Edinburgh University Press

ISBN: 9781474439053

Category: Literary Criticism

Page: 224

View: 891

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Combining recent insights from animal studies, critical plant studies and the new materialisms, Danielle Sands reads fiction and philosophy alongside each other to propose a method of thinking of and with animals that draws on a bestiary of affects. She challenges the claim that empathy should be primary mode of engagement with nonhuman life. Instead, she looks at the stories that we tell, and are told, by insects - beings at the edges of animal life. The indifference, even disgust, that these creatures evoke in us forms the basis for a new ethics not limited by empathy. Along the way she encounters fiction writers Yann Martel, Karen Joy Fowler, Han Kang and Jim Crace beside the philosophy of Graham Harman, Donna Haraway, Jacques Derrida and Roger Caillois.

Derrida Now

34 35 36 37 38 39 40 41 42 43 44 45 46 47 48 49 Harold Pinter, The Birthday Party, in Plays 1 (London: Faber and Faber, 1991), 76–8. See Jacques Derrida, The Animal That Therefore I Am, ed. MarieLouise Mallet, trans.

Author: John W. P. Phillips

Publisher: John Wiley & Sons

ISBN: 9780745676081

Category: Philosophy

Page: 200

View: 167

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For more than 30 years and until his death in 2004, Jacques Derrida remained one of the most influential contemporary philosophers. It may be difficult to evaluate what forms his legacy will take in the future but Derrida Now provides some provocative suggestions. Derridas often-controversial early reception was based on readings of his complex works, published in journals and collected in books. More recently attention has tended to focus on his later work, which grew out of the seminars that he presented each year in France and the US. The full texts of these seminars are now the subject of a major publication project, to be produced over the next ten years. Derrida Now presents contemporary articles based on or around the study of Derrida. It provides a critical introduction to Derridas complex and controversial thought, offers careful analysis of some of his most important concepts, and includes essays that address the major strands of his thought. Derridas influence reached not only into philosophy but also into other fields concerned with literature, politics, visual art, law, ecology, psychoanalysis, gender and sexuality and this book will appeal to readers in all these disciplines. Contributors include Peggy Kamuf, Geoff Bennington, Nicholas Royle, Roy Sellars, Graham Allen and Irving Goh.

Metacide

Giorgio Agamben, The Open: Man and Animal, trans. Kevin Attell (Stanford: Stanford University Press, 2004). Jacques Derrida, The Animal That Therefore I Am, ed. Marie-Louise Mallet; trans. David Wills (New York: Fordham University Press ...

Author:

Publisher: BRILL

ISBN: 9789042028548

Category: Philosophy

Page: 328

View: 720

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If philosophy addresses concrete ethical challenges, then what shifts in basic concepts must be made to the discipline in the darkness of our genocidal world? What anti-genocidal strains are in Western philosophy? Are we “really” rejects and/ or “still of intrinsic worth” when we fail our excellence tests? How are we represented and how do we participate in representations? Are representational forms historical in origin and development? Is genocide indissolubly linked to our degradation and destruction of animals? Can one slaughter and eat one’s partners in a social bond? If so, what does this tell us about the socio-political world we have formed? Is there a deep center—metacide—in our culture from which genocide receives its impulse? These are some of the pivotal questions addressed in the thirteen thought-provoking essays of this volume.

The End of the World and Other Teachable Moments

accounts for its many methodological reversals. In The Animal That Therefore I Am, it is the animal that is first seen seeing and the human that is first seen seen—a simple reversal that is enough to reorient an entire philosophical ...

Author: Michael Naas

Publisher: Fordham Univ Press

ISBN: 9780823263301

Category: Philosophy

Page: 213

View: 903

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A Derrida scholar traces the evolution of the philosopher’s final seminar in Paris as he contemplates the state of the world and his own mortality. For decades, philosopher Jacques Derrida held weekly seminars in Paris, spending years at a time on a single, complex theme. From 2001 to 2003, he delivered the final work in this series, entitled “The Beast and the Sovereign.” As this final seminar progressed, its central theme was diverted by questions of death, mourning, memory, and, especially, the end of the world. Now philosopher and Derrida scholar Michael Naas takes readers through the remarkable itinerary of Derrida’s final seminar in The End of the World and Other Teachable Moments. The book begins with Derrida’s analyses of the question of the animal in the context of his other published works on that subject. It then follows Derrida as a very different tone begins to emerge, one that wavers between melancholy and extraordinary lucidity with regard to the end of life. Focusing the entire second year on Daniel Defoe’s novel Robinson Crusoe and Martin Heidegger’s seminar “The Fundamental Concepts of Metaphysics,” Derrida explores questions of the end of the world and of an originary violence that is both creative and destructive. The End of the World and Other Teachable Moments follows Derrida from week to week as he responds to these emerging questions, as well as to important events unfolding around him, both world events—the aftermath of 9/11, the American invasion of Iraq—and more personal ones, from the death of Maurice Blanchot to intimations of his own death less than two years away.

Re imagining the Animal in J M Coetzee s The Lives of Animals Unsettling Boundaries of Representation

ape, Red Peter, who stands before the members of a learned society telling the story of his lifeof his ascent ... solicits attention, endlessly and from a novel perspective” in his 'The Animal That Therefore I Am' (Derrida, 1997: 374).

Author: Amy Wattam

Publisher: GRIN Verlag

ISBN: 9783346346810

Category: Literary Criticism

Page: 140

View: 468

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Master's Thesis from the year 2019 in the subject English Language and Literature Studies - Literature, grade: A, Nelson Mandela Metropolitan University, course: Masters degree research in English Literature, language: English, abstract: This paper re-imagines the animal in J.M. Coetzee’s "The Lives of Animals”. It focuses on how Coetzee’s narrative problematizes dominant discourses through questioning their authority. Furthermore, the narrative offers alternatives to anthropocentric conceptions of the animal that are based upon reason-centred and dualistic thought. The duality of human versus animal is explored alongside other dualities deconstructed in the text, such as fiction versus non-fiction, and philosophy versus literature. Coetzee’s representation of these constructs and their interconnectedness is investigated, specifically with regard to positively developing human-animal relations. Through exploring what Coetzee calls the 'sympathetic imagination', his alternative contribution to the field of human-animal relations will be considered. This study focuses on the space for re-imagination that Coetzee has provided with "The Lives of Animals". It highlights the role literature can and ought to play in this re-imagination, and why this re-imagination is necessary for the development of human-animal relations. Posthumanism will be used as a theoretical lens throughout, as it appears to resonate closely with Coetzee’s project. Both the form and the content of the text will be analysed, highlighting their interconnected significance in Coetzee’s project and the continued relevance of interventions such as this. J.M. Coetzee’s "The Lives of Animals" (1999) is a literary representation of, and intervention into, human-animal relations. It is an experimental literary destabilization of the generic boundaries that underlie the systematic (mis)representation and (mis)treatment of nonhuman animals, specifically their mass commodification in contemporary societies. The text provides a critique and negotiation of anthropocentric reason and its ramifications for nonhuman animals.