The Ancient Aesthetics of Deception

Heliodorus' Ethiopica, discussed in Chapter 10, still awaits its discovery by scholars of ancient aesthetics. The latest of the five fully preserved ancient Greek novels piercingly reflects on the aesthetics of deception.

Author: Jonas Grethlein

Publisher: Cambridge University Press

ISBN: 9781316518816

Category: History

Page: 320

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A bold new history of ancient aesthetics and its entanglement with ethics, with ongoing significance for current debates.

The Ancient Aesthetics of Deception

In creatively exploring the various reconfigurations of apatē, and placing these in their socio-historical contexts, the book offers a bold new history of ancient aesthetics.

Author: Jonas Grethlein

Publisher:

ISBN: 1009009125

Category: HISTORY

Page:

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"The concept of mimēsis has dominated reflection on the nature and role of representation in Greek literature. Jonas Grethlein, in his ambitious new book, takes this reflection a step further. He argues that, beyond mimēsis, there was an important but unacknowledged strand of reflection focused instead on the nuanced idea of apatē (often translated into English as 'deceit'), oscillating between notions of 'deception' and 'aesthetic illusion'. Many authors from Gorgias and Plato to Philo, Plutarch and Clement of Alexandria used this key concept to entwine aesthetics with ethics. In creatively exploring the various reconfigurations of apatē, and placing these in their socio-historical contexts, the book offers a bold new history of ancient aesthetics. It also explores the present significance of the aesthetics of deception, unlocking the potential of ancient reflection for current debates on the ethical dimension of representation. It will appeal to scholars in classics and literary theory alike"--

The Philosophical Stage

Grethlein offers a thorough and penetrating reading and contextualization of Gorgias' apothegm, arguing that it is foundational for an ancient discourse of deception that combines ethics and aesthetics: Jonas Grethlein, The Ancient ...

Author: Joshua Billings

Publisher: Princeton University Press

ISBN: 9780691211114

Category: Drama

Page: 288

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A bold new reconception of ancient Greek drama as a mode of philosophical thinking The Philosophical Stage offers an innovative approach to ancient Greek literature and thought that places drama at the heart of intellectual history. Drawing on evidence from tragedy and comedy, Joshua Billings shines new light on the development of early Greek philosophy, arguing that drama is our best source for understanding the intellectual culture of classical Athens. In this incisive book, Billings recasts classical Greek intellectual history as a conversation across discourses and demonstrates the significance of dramatic reflections on widely shared theoretical questions. He argues that neither "literature" nor "philosophy" was a defined category in the fifth century BCE, and develops a method of reading dramatic form as a structured investigation of issues at the heart of the emerging discipline of philosophy. A breathtaking work of intellectual history by one of today’s most original classical scholars, The Philosophical Stage presents a novel approach to ancient drama and sets a path for a renewed understanding of early Greek thought.

Reading Heliodorus Aethiopica

Preposterous Poetics : The Politics and Aesthetics of Form in Late Antiquity . Cambridge . Goold , G. P. 1995. Chariton . ... The Ancient Aesthetics of Deception : The Ethics of Enchantment from Gorgias to Heliodorus . Cambridge .

Author: Ian Repath

Publisher: Oxford University Press

ISBN: 9780192511133

Category: History

Page: 336

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Heliodorus' Aethiopica (Ethiopian Story) is the latest, longest, and greatest of the ancient Greek romances. It was hugely admired in Byzantium, and caused a sensation when it was rediscovered and translated into French in the 16th century: its impact on later European literature (including Shakespeare and Sidney) and art is incalculable. As with all post-classical Greek literature, its popularity dived in the 19th century, thanks to the influence of romanticism. Since the 1980s, however, new generations of readers have rediscovered this extraordinary late-antique tale of adventure, travel, and love. Recent scholars have demonstrated not just the complexity and sophistication of the text's formal aspects, but its daring experiments with the themes of race, gender, and religion. This volume brings together fifteen established experts in the ancient romance from across the world: each explores a passage or section of the text in depth, teasing out its subtleties and illustrating the rewards reaped thanks to slow, patient readings of what was arguably classical antiquity's last classic.

Deception

Still, postmodernists are aware, just as Descartes was, that disposing of clear adversities gives opportunity to deception. But they no longer fear it. Jean Baudrillard, a keen diagnostician of our times, believes the strategies of ...

Author: Majkut, Paul

Publisher: Zeta Books

ISBN: 9789731997575

Category: Deception

Page: 319

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History of Aesthetics Ancient aesthetics

This state of deception , hallucination and delusion the Greeks called apate . ... or apatetic ( to use the term derived from the root word ) theory which seems to be in all respects modern , yet was an invention of the ancients .

Author: Władysław Tatarkiewicz

Publisher: Hague : Mouton

ISBN: UOM:39015012909555

Category: Aesthetics

Page: 1148

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Deception and Detection in Eighteenth century Britain

In the first extended treatment of the debates surrounding public deception in eighteenth-century Britain, Jack Lynch contends that forgery and fraud make explicit the usually unspoken grounds on which Britons made sense of their world.

Author: John T. Lynch

Publisher: Ashgate Publishing, Ltd.

ISBN: 0754665283

Category: Literary Criticism

Page: 218

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In the first extended treatment of the debates surrounding public deception in eighteenth-century Britain, Jack Lynch contends that forgery and fraud make explicit the usually unspoken grounds on which Britons made sense of their world. While taking up the critical philosophical questions surrounding fraud, Lynch shows that fakery takes us to the heart of eighteenth-century values as they relate to evidence, perception and memory, the relationship between art and life, historicism, and human motivation.

Beyond the Second Sophistic

Acting is thus conceived of as a form of illusion, a central concept in Greek aesthetics. Gorgias famously commented on tragedy that it is “a deception in which the deceiver is more just than the nondeceiver and the deceived is wiser ...

Author: Tim Whitmarsh

Publisher: University of California Press

ISBN: 9780520344587

Category: History

Page: 296

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The “Second Sophistic” traditionally refers to a period at the height of the Roman Empire’s power that witnessed a flourishing of Greek rhetoric and oratory, and since the 19th century it has often been viewed as a defense of Hellenic civilization against the domination of Rome. This book proposes a very different model. Covering popular fiction, poetry and Greco-Jewish material, it argues for a rich, dynamic, and diverse culture, which cannot be reduced to a simple model of continuity. Shining new light on a series of playful, imaginative texts that are left out of the traditional accounts of Greek literature, Whitmarsh models a more adventurous, exploratory approach to later Greek culture. Beyond the Second Sophistic offers not only a new way of looking at Greek literature from 300 BCE onwards, but also a challenge to the Eurocentric, aristocratic constructions placed on the Greek heritage. Accessible and lively, it will appeal to students and scholars of Greek literature and culture, Hellenistic Judaism, world literature, and cultural theory.

Self deception and Morality

The appeal of this book is broad. The volume will challenge professional philosophers and psychologists, yet it is organized and written to be accessible to students in courses on ethics, philosophy of mind, and philosophy of literature.

Author: Mike W. Martin

Publisher:

ISBN: UCAL:B4243839

Category: Philosophy

Page: 177

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This book systematically explores the moral issues surrounding self-deception. While many articles and books have been written on the concept of self-deception in recent years, Martin's gives much greater emphasis to self-deception as a significant topic for both ethical theory and applied ethics. "Self-deception is . . . perplexing from a moral point of view. It seems tailor-made to camouflage and foster immorality. . . . Does all self-deception involve some guilt, and is it among the most abhorrent evils. as some moralists and theologians have charged? Or is it only wrong sometimes, such as when it has bad consequences? Could it on occasion be permissible or even desirable to deceive ourselves, just as we are sometimes justified in deceiving other people? Are self-deceivers perhaps more like innocent victims than perpetrators of deceit, and as such deserving of compassion and help? Or, paradoxically, are they best viewed with ambivalence: culpable as deceivers and simultaneously innocent as victims of deception?" (from the introduction) Martin develops a conception of self-deception as the purposeful evasion of acknowledging to oneself truths or one's view of truth. He details a systematic framework for understanding the main moral perspectives and traditions concerning self-deception that have emerged in western philosophy. In so doing, he clarifies related concepts like sincerity, authenticity, honesty, hypocrisy, weakness of will, and self-understanding. Ranging across traditions both philosophical (Kant, Kierkegaard, and Sartre) and non-philosophical (Freud, Eugene O'Neill, and Henrik Ibsen), Martin shows why self-deception is as morally complex as any other major form of behavior. The appeal of this book is broad. The volume will challenge professional philosophers and psychologists, yet it is organized and written to be accessible to students in courses on ethics, philosophy of mind, and philosophy of literature. Martin's numerous literary examples should also interest literary critics.

Recognizing Miracles in Antiquity and Beyond

Gager, J. (1992), Curse tablets and Binding Spells from the Ancient World, Oxford. ... A Companion to Ancient Aesthetics, Malden, 422–437. ... (1993), “The Perception of Deception and Gullibility in Specialists of the Supernatural.

Author: Maria Gerolemou

Publisher: Walter de Gruyter GmbH & Co KG

ISBN: 9783110563559

Category: Literary Criticism

Page: 450

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In recent years, scholars have extensively explored the function of the miraculous and wondrous in ancient narratives, mostly pondering on how ancient authors view wondrous accounts, i.e. the treatment of the descriptions of wondrous occurrences as true events or their use. More precisely, these narratives investigate whether the wondrous pursues a display of erudition or merely provides stylistic variety; sometimes, such narratives even represent the wish of the author to grant a “rational explanation” to extraordinary actions. At present, however, two aspects of the topic have not been fully examined: a) the ability of the wondrous/miraculous to set cognitive mechanisms in motion and b) the power of the wondrous/miraculous to contribute to the construction of an authorial identity (that of kings, gods, or narrators). To this extent, the volume approaches miracles and wonders as counter intuitive phenomena, beyond cognitive grasp, which challenge the authenticity of human experience and knowledge and push forward the frontiers of intellectual and aesthetic experience. Some of the articles of the volume examine miracles on the basis of bewilderment that could lead to new factual knowledge; the supernatural is here registered as something natural (although strange); the rest of the articles treat miracles as an endpoint, where human knowledge stops and the unknown divine begins (here the supernatural is confirmed). Thence, questions like whether the experience of a miracle or wonder as a counter intuitive phenomenon could be part of long-term memory, i.e. if miracles could be transformed into solid knowledge and what mental functions are encompassed in this process, are central in the discussion.