The Afterlife of the Platonic Soul

This volume of essays presents a selection of studies in the ways in which Platonist psychology is adapted to the needs of thinkers in the three great religious traditions of later antiquity, Judaism, Christianity and Islam.

Author: Maha El-Kaisy

Publisher: BRILL

ISBN: 9789047429678

Category: History

Page: 246

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This volume of essays presents a selection of studies in the ways in which Platonist psychology is adapted to the needs of thinkers in the three great religious traditions of later antiquity, Judaism, Christianity and Islam. The authors are all acknowledged experts in their own fields, as well as being familiar with the Platonic tradition.

The Afterlife of the Platonic Soul

Reflections of Platonic Psychology in the Monotheistic Religions Maha Elkaisy-Friemuth, John Myles Dillon ... with sense-perception and the passions, and both should be disposed of when the soul comes to be free of the body after death.

Author: Maha Elkaisy-Friemuth

Publisher: BRILL

ISBN: 9789004176232

Category: Religion

Page: 236

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Plato's doctrine of the soul, its immaterial nature, its parts or faculties, and its fate after death (and before birth) came to have an enormous influence on the great religious traditions that sprang up in late antiquity, beginning with Judaism (in the person of Philo of Alexandria), and continuing with Christianity, from St. Paul on through the Alexandrian and Cappadocian Fathers to Byzantium, and finally with Islamic thinkers from Al-kindi on. This volume, while not aspiring to completeness, attempts to provide insights into how members of each of these traditions adapted Platonist doctrines to their own particular needs, with varying degrees of creativity.

The Afterlife of the Platonic Soul

This volume, while not aspiring to completeness, attempts to provide insights into how members of each of these traditions adapted Platonist doctrines to their own particular needs, with varying degrees of creativity"--Provided by publisher ...

Author: Dillon El-Kaisy

Publisher: Brill Academic Publishers

ISBN: 6612401400

Category: Abrahamic religions

Page: 236

View: 626

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"Plato's doctrine of the soul, its immaterial nature, its parts or faculties, and its fate after death (and before birth) came to have an enormous influence on the great religious traditions that sprang up in late antiquity, beginning with Judaism (in the person of Philo of Alexandria), and continuing with Christianity, from St. Paul on through the Alexandrian and Cappadocian Fathers to Byzantium, and finally with Islamic thinkers from Al-kindi on. This volume, while not aspiring to completeness, attempts to provide insights into how members of each of these traditions adapted Platonist doctrines to their own particular needs, with varying degrees of creativity"--Provided by publisher.

Turning the Whole Soul

Plato's myths of the afterlife have, for centuries, puzzled scholars.

Author: Joseph Forte

Publisher:

ISBN: OCLC:981124798

Category: Future life

Page: 287

View: 126

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Plato's myths of the afterlife have, for centuries, puzzled scholars. This has been the case for a number of reasons, including but not limited to Plato's (perhaps intentional) lack of clarity about the function of those myths in their respective dialogues. This study provides a systematic account of this function: the psychagogy, or soul-turning, that these myths provoke in their readers, that is, the multifaceted ways in which souls are led out of the darkness of ignorance to the light of knowledge by these powerful image-rich passages. In the course of this account, new light is shed on the very concept of psychagogy in Plato, as well as on what exactly constitutes a Platonic myth of the afterlife, and also on the ways in which the Republic can serve as an illuminating lens through which to read the Phaedo and Gorgias. The study begins by laying out its foundation in chapter 1: an understanding of Platonic myth situated in secondary scholarship, a working conception of what constitutes a Platonic myth of the afterlife, and an understanding of psychagogy that incorporates both its description in the Phaedrus and its expression in the psychology, epistemology, and metaphysics of the Republic. The account of the Republic focuses in particular on the tripartite soul (rational, spirited, and appetitive) and on the simile of the Line and the Allegory of the Cave, which provide the interpretive tools for the subsequent study of the myths. The central chapters (2-4) examine the concluding myths of the Republic, Phaedo, and Gorgias: the myth of Er, the "True Earth" myth, and the Gorgias myth of judgment, respectively. Each chapter proceeds first with a literal reading of the myth, showing how such a reading engages each aspect of the reader0́9s tripartite soul, while also leading the soul from mere conjecture to belief or true opinion0́4that is, from the lowest stage of knowledge according to the simile of the Divided Line and the Allegory of the Cave to the second lowest. The second major part of each central chapter is a figurative or metaphorical reading that shows how such an interpretation, while engaging each aspect of the tripartite soul, leads it further than belief or true opinion toward knowledge in the vast realm of intelligible (as opposed to physical) realities. Chapter 5 considers other mythical passages in Plato regarding the afterlife, from the Phaedrus, Meno, Laws, Timaeus, Apology, and Theatetus, explaining why these passages are essentially different from the three central myths of the study and, thus, why those three, and not the others, properly constitute Plato's afterlife myths. The essential difference is the specific manner in which the psychagogy of the three central myths is carried out, which draws largely on the consummating function of these myths within their respective dialogues. The dissertation concludes with a chapter spelling out the contributions of the study in further detail.

Mapping the Afterlife

Dante uses a similar strategy to accommodate the Platonic return of souls to the Christian doctrine of the resurrection. Christian souls cannot return to the stars, because in Christian theology, resurrection is “a new embodied life” in ...

Author: Emma Gee

Publisher: Oxford University Press

ISBN: 9780190670498

Category: Religion

Page: 286

View: 913

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There are very few accounts of the afterlife across the period from Homer to Dante. Most traditional studies approach the classical afterlife from the point of view of its "evolution" towards the Christian afterlife. This book tries to do something different: to explore afterlife narratives in spatial terms and to situate this tradition within the ambit of a fundamental need in human psychology for the synthesis of soul (or "self") and universe. Drawing on the works of Homer, Plato, Cicero, Virgil, and Dante, among others, as well as on modern works on psychology, cartography, and music theory, Mapping the Afterlife argues that the topography of the afterlife in the Greek and Roman tradition, and in Dante, reflects the state of "scientific" knowledge at the time of the various contexts in which we find it. The book posits that there is a dominant spatial idiom in afterlife landscapes, a "journey-vision paradigm"--the horizontal journey of the soul across the afterlife landscape, and a synoptic vision of the universe. Many scholars have argued that the vision of the universe is out of place in the underworld landscape. However, looking across the entire tradition, we find that afterlife landscapes, almost without exception, contain these two kinds of space in one form or another. This double vision of space brings the underworld, as the landscape of the soul, into contact with the "scientific" universe; and brings humanity into line with the cosmos.

The Afterlife in Popular Culture Heaven Hell and the Underworld in the American Imagination

souls. Using this model, death represents the moment when the undying soul leaves the dying body to pursue its own destiny. In Western tradition, the ancient Greek philosopher Plato is credited in articulating this view.

Author: Kevin O'Neill

Publisher: ABC-CLIO

ISBN: 9781440868597

Category: Social Science

Page: 370

View: 125

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What happens to us when we die? The book seeks to explore how that question has been answered in American popular culture. It begins with five framing essays that provide historical and intellectual background on ideas about the afterlife in Western culture. These essays are followed by over 100 entries, each focusing on specific cultural products or authors that feature the afterlife front and center. Entries topics include novels, film, television shows, plays, works of nonfiction, graphic novels, and more, all of which address some aspect of what may await us after our passing. This book is unique in marrying a historical overview of the afterlife with detailed analyses of particular cultural products, such as films and novels. In addition, it covers these topics in nonspecialist language, written with a high school and college audience in mind. The book provides historical context for contemporary depictions of the afterlife addressed in the entries, which deal specifically with work produced in the 20th and 21st centuries.

World Soul Anima Mundi

Dillon, John: 'Philo of Alexandria in Platonist Philosophy', in: Maha Elkaisy-Freimuth and John Dillon (eds.), The Afterlife of the Platonic Soul. Reflections of Platonic Psychology in the Monotheistic Religions, Leiden 2009, 17–24.

Author: Christoph Helmig

Publisher: Walter de Gruyter GmbH & Co KG

ISBN: 9783110628609

Category: Philosophy

Page: 372

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From Plato’s Timaeus onwards, the world or cosmos has been conceived of as a living, rational organism. Most notably in German Idealism, philosophers still talked of a ‘Weltseele’ (Schelling) or ‘Weltgeist’ (Hegel). This volume is the first collection of essays on the origin of the notion of the world soul (anima mundi) in Antiquity and beyond. It contains 14 original contributions by specialists in the field of ancient philosophy, the Platonic tradition and the history of theology. The topics range from the ‘obscure’ Presocratic Heraclitus, to Plato and his ancient readers in Middle and Neoplatonism (including the Stoics), to the reception of the idea of a world soul in the history of natural science. A general introduction highlights the fundamental steps in the development of the Platonic notion throughout late Antiquity and early Christian philosophy. Accessible to Classicists, historians of philosophy, theologians and invaluable to specialists in ancient philosophy, the book provides an overview of the fascinating discussions surrounding a conception that had a long-lasting effect on the history of Western thought.

Conduct and Behavior as Determinants for the Afterlife

most famous myths are those concerning a judgment in the afterlife.17 Plato, in his eschatological myths,18 claims that ... is true about our souls and their dwelling places . . . and a man should repeat this to himself as if it were an ...

Author: Gary A. Stilwell

Publisher: Universal-Publishers

ISBN: 9781581121070

Category: History

Page: 408

View: 685

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This dissertation argues that conduct and behavior were believed essential for determining one's post-mortem fate from the earliest periods of both ancient Egypt and ancient Greece. Part one of this four-part study examines Plato's eschatological myths and provides a complete catalog and brief discussion of all references in them to conduct and behavior that affect one's fate in the afterlife. Part two traces the evolution of the concept of the afterlife from Homer to the Dramatists, also cataloging all references to the afterlife that mention conduct and behavior. This part of the study demonstrates that the concept of reward and retribution in an afterlife, based on conduct in this life, is already found in Homer. However, it is in Pythagorean and Orphics circles of Greater Greece that it reaches its most dramatic development and from that milieu provides such an enormous impact on Plato. The third part deals with the connection between conduct and the afterlife in ancient Egypt up to the time of the Book of the Dead. An extensive catalog of Egyptian virtues and vices that have afterlife consequences is compiled from the religious texts of the 5th to 18th Dynasty. In part four, the relationship between conduct and behavior and the afterlife beliefs of the two societies are compared and contrasted. In the earliest periods, the afterlife texts appear to be concerned only with the elite: the king in Egyptian 5th Dynasty Pyramid Texts and the heroes in Homeric and Hesiodic Greece. This study argues that there is some evidence in the early texts of both societies for a belief that commoners could also be rewarded or punished in an afterlife. In later periods both societies' religious texts dealing with the afterlife exhibit a much more developed democratization. As post-mortem beliefs became more democratic, conduct and behavior grew in importance. However, from the earliest time periods, both societies believe that the gods, primarily Maat in Egypt and Dike in Greece, are responsible for the proper ordering of the cosmos and that violations of that order will call down the most dire consequence -- the loss of a beneficent afterlife.

Resurrection Hell and the Afterlife

soul departs pure, dragging with it nothing of the body, because it never willingly associated with the body in life, but avoided it and so proceeds to ... In the work Gorgias , Plato provides a different perspective on the afterlife.

Author: Mark Finney

Publisher: Routledge

ISBN: 9781317236375

Category: Religion

Page: 212

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This book begins by arguing that early Greek reflection on the afterlife and immortality insisted on the importance of the physical body whereas a wealth of Jewish texts from the Hebrew Bible, Second Temple Judaism and early (Pauline) Christianity understood post-mortem existence to be that of the soul alone. Changes begin to appear in the later New Testament where the importance of the afterlife of the physical body became essential, and such thoughts continued into the period of the early Church where the significance of the physical body in post-mortem existence became a point of theological orthodoxy. This book will assert that the influx of Greco-Romans into the early Church changed the direction of Christian thought towards one which included the body. At the same time, the ideological and polemical thrust of an eternal tortuous afterlife for the wicked became essential.

Plato and the Individual

If the individual retains personality in the afterlife, then it becomes all the more important that he live in the right kind of society. After death the soul takes with it nothing “except what nurture and upbringing have made of it and ...

Author: Robert William Hall

Publisher: Springer

ISBN: 9789401193757

Category: Philosophy

Page: 224

View: 869

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In this study of Plato's theory of the individual, I propose to show that Plato is deeply concerned with the achievement by each person of the moral excellence appropriate to man. Plato exhibits profound interest in the moral well being of each individual, not merely those who are philosophically gifted. Obviously my study is in opposition with a traditional line of interpretation which holds that Plato evinces small concern for the ordinary individual, the "common man" of today. According to this interpretation Plato's chief interest, shown especially in the Republic, is with the philosophically endowed, whose knowledge penetrates to and embraces the realm of forms; this is a world which must remain for the common man an unfathomable mystery in its totality. Although he is unable to grasp the knowledge of the forms necessary for genuine morality, the ordinary individual may, if he is fortunate enough to live in a polis ruled by philosophers, gain a sort of secondary or "demotic" morality. Through the me chanical development of the right kind of habits, through faithful obedience to the decrees of the rulers and the laws of the polis, the many who are incapable of comprehending the true bases of morality will attain a second best, unreflective morality accompanied by happi ness.