Texas Indian Trails

Although the Wichitas settled well onto the Rolling Plains, they are discussed here because the Indian village at modern Waco is treated as an East Texas site. The Alabamas and Coushattas are two closely related peoples who migrated ...

Author: Daniel J. Gelo

Publisher: Taylor Trade Publishing

ISBN: 9781461625698

Category: Travel

Page: 256

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Connect the past with the present in Texas Indian Trails and appreciated this state's rich heritage by visiting the landmarks and campsites used by the Indians of Texas. This guidebook allows Texas natives and visitors to experience the Texas landscape as the Indians once knew it. Through local history and folklore, Texans will grow a new appreciation for their rich heritage, and visitors can learn to know Texas as the natives do.

Springs of Texas

Tahoka Springs were a stop on an old Indian trail . As Hill ( 1935 ) says , Lynn County is unusual for the High Plains in that it has the canyon of the Double Mountain Fork of the Brazos River on its easter edge , and also a number of ...

Author: Gunnar M. Brune

Publisher: Texas A&M University Press

ISBN: 1585441961

Category: Nature

Page: 566

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This text explores the natural history of Texas and more than 2900 springs in 183 Texas counties. It also includes an in-depth discussion of the general characteristics of springs - their physical and prehistoric settings, their historical significance, and their associated flora and fauna.

Pioneer Trails West

On the southern plains buffalo and Indian trails were also useful to travelers . In the 1530s Cabeza de Vaca did not see any trails in Texas , but a few years later Coronado's men followed “ paths down into the ravines , made by the ...

Author: Western Writers of America

Publisher: Caxton Press

ISBN: 0870043048

Category: History

Page: 292

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Tells the stories of twenty trails used by Indians, white settlers, and cowboys

Cumulative List of Organizations Described in Section 170 c of the Internal Revenue Code of 1954

Indian Inter - Tribal Association of Arkansas Inc. , Houston , Tx . Indian Pentecostal Church of God New Jersey Inc. ... ( 4 ) Indian Trail Elementary Pto , Until June 2006 , Indian Trail , N. C. Indian Trails Camp Inc. , Troy , Mi.

Author: United States. Internal Revenue Service

Publisher:

ISBN: UOM:39015062116259

Category: Charitable uses, trusts, and foundations

Page:

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Cumulative List of Organizations Described in Section 170 c of the Internal Revenue Code of 1986

( 6 ) Indian Mound Cemetary Inc. , Graham , Tx . ( 6 ) Indian Wells Valley Search and Rescue Inc. , Indian Creek ... Indiana Bible College , Seymour , In . Indian Holiness Mission , Chambers , Az . Indian Trail Pow Wow Association Inc.

Author:

Publisher:

ISBN: NYPL:33433016643763

Category: Charitable uses, trusts, and foundations

Page:

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Comanche Marker Trees of Texas

Native American Trail Marker Trees: Marking Paths through the Wilderness. Buffalo Grove, IL: Chicago's Books ... “Texas Indian Trails.” Plano, TX: Republic of Texas ... Picture-Writing of Texas Indians: Anthropological Papers. Vol. 2.

Author: Steve Houser

Publisher: Texas A&M University Press

ISBN: 9781623494483

Category: History

Page: 224

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In this unprecedented effort to gather and share knowledge of the Native American practice of creating, designating, and making use of marker trees, an arborist, an anthropologist, and a Comanche tribal officer have merged their wisdom, research, and years of personal experience to create Comanche Marker Trees of Texas. A genuine marker tree is a rare find—only six of these natural and cultural treasures have been officially documented in Texas and recognized by the Comanche Nation. The latter third of the book highlights the characteristics of these six marker trees and gives an up-to-date history of each, displaying beautiful photographs of these long-standing, misshapen, controversial symbols that have withstood the tests of time and human activity. Thoroughly researched and richly illustrated with maps, drawings, and photographs of trees, this book offers a close look at the unique cultural significance of these living witnesses to our history and provides detailed guidelines on how to recognize, research, and report potential marker tree candidates.

Publication

Indian Trails Camp Inc. , Grand Rapids , Mi. Indian Pentecostal Church Hebron Dallas Inc. , Indian Trails Missions Inc. , Mesa , Az . Garland , Tx . Indian Training and Education Center Inc. , Indian Pentecostal Church of God Dallas ...

Author:

Publisher:

ISBN: OSU:32435053658886

Category: Income tax

Page:

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Cumulative List of Organizations Described in Section 170 c of the Internal Revenue Code of 1954

Indian Trails Camp Inc. , Grand Rapids , Mi. Indian Pentecostal Church Hebron Dallas Inc. , Indian Trails Missions Inc. , Mesa , Az . Garland , Tx . Indian Training and Education Center Inc. , Indian Pentecostal Church of God Chicago ...

Author:

Publisher:

ISBN: UCBK:C061787705

Category: Charitable uses, trusts, and foundations

Page:

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The Chisholm Trail

“Retracing the Chisholm Trail.” Southwestern Historical Quarterly 60 (July 1956): 53–68. . “The Shawnee Trail.” Southwestern Historical Quarterly 56 (January 1953): 359–77. Gelo, Daniel L. and Wayne J. Pate. Texas Indian Trails.

Author: James E. Sherow

Publisher: University of Oklahoma Press

ISBN: 9780806162935

Category: Biography & Autobiography

Page: 360

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One hundred fifty years ago the McCoy brothers of Springfield, Illinois, bet their fortunes on Abilene, Kansas, then just a slapdash way station. Instead of an endless horizon of prairie grasses, they saw a bustling outlet for hundreds of thousands of Texas Longhorns coming up the Chisholm Trail—and the youngest brother, Joseph, saw how a middleman could become wealthy in the process. This is the story of how that gamble paid off, transforming the cattle trade and, with it, the American landscape and diet. The Chisholm Trail follows McCoy’s vision and the effects of the Chisholm Trail from post–Civil War Texas and Kansas to the multimillion-dollar beef industry that remade the Great Plains, the American diet, and the national and international beef trade. At every step, both nature and humanity put roadblocks in McCoy’s way. Texas cattle fever had dampened the appetite for longhorns, while prairie fires, thunderstorms, blizzards, droughts, and floods roiled the land. Unscrupulous railroad managers, stiff competition from other brokers, Indians who resented the usurping of their grasslands, and farmers who preferred growing wheat to raising cattle all threatened to impede the McCoys’ vision for the trail. As author James E. Sherow shows, by confronting these obstacles, McCoy put his own stamp upon the land, and on eating habits as far away as New York City and London. Joseph McCoy’s enterprise forged links between cattlemen, entrepreneurs, and restaurateurs; between ecology, disease, and technology; and between local, national, and international markets. Tracing these connections, The Chisholm Trail shows in vivid terms how a gamble made in the face of uncontrollable natural factors indelibly changed the environment, reshaped the Kansas prairie into the nation’s stockyard, and transformed Plains Indian hunting grounds into the hub of a domestic farm culture.

Comanches and Germans on the Texas Frontier

“'Comanche Land and Ever Has Been': A Native Geography of the Nineteenth-Century Comanchería.” Southwestern Historical Quarterly ... Texas Indian Trails. ... A New Land Beckoned: German Immigration to Texas, 1844–1847. New and enl. ed.

Author: Daniel J. Gelo

Publisher: Texas A&M University Press

ISBN: 9781623495947

Category: History

Page: 272

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In 1851, an article appeared in a German journal, Geographisches Jahrbuch (Geographic Yearbook), that sought to establish definitive connections, using language observations, among the Comanches, Shoshones, and Apaches. Heinrich Berghaus’s study was based on lexical data gathered by a young German settler in Texas, Emil Kriewitz, and included a groundbreaking list of Comanche words and their German translations. Berghaus also offered Kriewitz’s cultural notes on the Comanches, a discussion of the existing literature on the three tribes, and an original map of Comanche hunting grounds. Perhaps because it was published only in German, the existence of Berghaus’s study has been all but unknown to North American scholars, even though it offers valuable insights into Native American languages, toponyms, ethnonyms, hydronyms, and cultural anthropology. It was also a significant document revealing the history of German-Comanche relations in Texas. Daniel J. Gelo and Christopher J. Wickham now make available for the first time a reliable English translation of this important nineteenth-century document. In addition to making the article accessible to English speakers, they also place Berghaus’s work into historical context and provide detailed commentary on its value for anthropologists and historians who study German settlement in Texas. Comanches and Germans on the Texas Frontier will make significant contributions to multiple disciplines, opening a new lens onto Native American ethnography and ethnology.