This study challenges the accepted views in scholarship regarding the authorship and meaning of these texts. New manuscript sources are presented along with all the known text versions and a synoptic translation of the main text-types.

Author: Daniel Abrams

Publisher: Mohr Siebeck

ISBN: 3161467507

Category: History

Page: 240

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This study offers a fresh reinvestigation to the Sod ha-Egoz texts, the earliest known commentaries to Ezekiel's Chariot (Ma'aseh Merkavah) from the medieval Jewish mystics of Europe. The texts, ascribed to Eleazar of Worms and the circle of the German Pietists in 12th and 13th century Germany, apparently infer that the sexual reproduction of the Egoz (nut) reflects the workings of the chariot-world. If true, the main circle of the Jewish mystics prior to the appearance of the Kabbalah already believed in a doctrine which is widely considered a defining characteristic of Kabbalah. This study challenges the accepted views in scholarship regarding the authorship and meaning of these texts. New manuscript sources are presented along with all the known text versions and a synoptic translation of the main text-types.

Kabbalistic Manuscripts and Textual Theory

This book is certainly monumental, offering in its seven hundred pages a wealth of documentation and distilled argument that manages to be both comprehensive in its materials and transparent in its critical insights.

Author: Daniel Abrams

Publisher: Gefen Books

ISBN: STANFORD:36105215165833

Category: Body, Mind & Spirit

Page: 743

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Kabbalistic Manuscripts and Textual Theory uncovers the unstated assumptions and expectations of scribes and scholars who fashioned editions from manuscripts of Jewish mystical literature. This study offers a theory of kabbalistic textuality in which the material book the printed page no less than handwritten manuscripts serves as the site for textual dialogue between Jewish mystics of different periods and locations. The refashioning of the text through the process of reading and commenting that takes place on the page in the margins and between the lines blurs the boundaries between the traditionally defined roles of author, reader, commentator and editor. This study shows that kabbalists and academic editors reinvented the text in their own image, as part of a fluid textual process that was nothing short of transformative. This book is certainly monumental, offering in its seven hundred pages a wealth of documentation and distilled argument that manages to be both comprehensive in its materials and transparent in its critical insights. It is rare indeed that a work of such formidable scholarship can actually be a pleasure to read and convincing in its elucidation of what are often extremely complex documentary circumstances and editorial traditions. From the foreword by David Greetham

Sefer Hasidim and the Ashkenazic Book in Medieval Europe

Sexual Symbolism and Merkavah Speculation in Medieval Germany: A Study of the Sod ha-Egoz Texts. Texts and Studies in Medieval and Early Modern Judaism 13. Tübingen: J. C. B. Mohr [Paul Siebeck], 1997. Abrams, Daniel.

Author: Ivan G. Marcus

Publisher: University of Pennsylvania Press

ISBN: 9780812295009

Category: Social Science

Page: 216

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Composed in Germany in the early thirteenth century by Judah ben Samuel he-hasid, Sefer Hasidim, or "Book of the Pietists," is a compendium of religious instruction that portrays the everyday life of Jews as they lived together with and apart from Christians in towns such as Speyer, Worms, Mainz, and Regensburg. A charismatic religious teacher who recorded hundreds of original stories that mirrored situations in medieval social living, Judah's messages advocated praying slowly and avoiding honor, pleasure, wealth, and the lures of unmarried sex. Although he failed to enact his utopian vision of a pietist Jewish society, his collected writings would help shape the religious culture of Ashkenazic Judaism for centuries. In "Sefer Hasidim" and the Ashkenazic Book in Medieval Europe, Ivan G. Marcus proposes a new paradigm for understanding how this particular book was composed. The work, he contends, was an open text written by a single author in hundreds of disjunctive, yet self-contained, segments, which were then combined into multiple alternative versions, each equally authoritative. While Sefer Hasidim offers the clearest example of this model of composition, Marcus argues that it was not unique: the production of Ashkenazic books in small and easily rearranged paragraphs is a literary and cultural phenomenon quite distinct from anything practiced by the Christian authors of northern Europe or the Sephardic Jews of the south. According to Marcus, Judah, in authoring Sefer Hasidim in this manner, not only resisted Greco-Roman influences on Ashkenazic literary form but also extended an earlier Byzantine rabbinic tradition of authorship into medieval European Jewish culture.

Karaite Exegesis in Medieval Jerusalem

Abrams , Daniel : Sexual Symbolism and Merkavah Speculation in Medieval Germany . 1997. Vol . 13 . Alexander - Frizer , Tamar : The Pious Sinner . 1991. Vol . 5 . Altmann , Alexander : Von der mittelalterlichen zur modernen Aufklärung .

Author: Miriam Goldstein

Publisher: Mohr Siebeck

ISBN: 3161509722

Category: Religion

Page: 250

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Miriam Goldstein examines the commentary on the Pentateuch authored in the late tenth century by Yusuf ibn Nuh, a leader of the Karaite scholarly community in Jerusalem, and revised and updated by his student Abu al-Faraj Harun. Goldstein examines the work ́s historical background and reception, as well as its exegetical method, a combination of traditional Jewish techniques with methods inspired by the Arabic-Islamic environment. The resulting examination serves as a general introduction to the Karaite school of Judeo-Arabic exegesis (10th/11th c. C.E.), a crucial link between traditional rabbinic literature and the Jewish Bible exegesis of Europe. This book is intended for students of the Bible and biblical exegesis and of medieval Jewish and Middle Eastern history, as well as those simply curious to learn more about this vibrant period of creative composition in Judeo-Arabic.

Forsaken

Sexual Symbolism and Merkavah Speculation in Medieval Germany. Tübingen: J. C. B. Mohr, 1997. —. “The Shekhina Prays before God: A New Text Concerning the Theosophic Orientation of the German Pietists and Their Method for the ...

Author: Sharon Faye Koren

Publisher: UPNE

ISBN: 9781611680225

Category: Religion

Page: 447

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A fascinating analysis of why there are no female mystics in medieval Judaism

A Remembrance of His Wonders

Sexual Symbolism and Merkavah Speculation in Medieval Germany: A Study of the Sod ha-Egoz Texts. Tübingen: Mohr Siebeck, 1997. ———. “'Sod kol ha-Sodot': Tefisat ha-Kavod ve-Kavanat ha-Tefilah biKitvei R. Elazar mi-Vorms ve-Hadayah ...

Author: David I. Shyovitz

Publisher: University of Pennsylvania Press

ISBN: 9780812249118

Category: History

Page: 352

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In A Remembrance of His Wonders, David I. Shyovitz uncovers the sophisticated ways in which medieval Ashkenazic Jews engaged with the workings and meaning of the natural world, and traces the porous boundaries between medieval science and mysticism, nature and the supernatural, and ultimately, Christians and Jews.

The Unique Cherub Circle

Texts and Studies in Medieval and Early Modern Judaism Alphabetical Index Abrams , Daniel : Sexual Symbolism and Merkavah Speculation in Medieval Germany . 1997. Volume 13 . Alexander - Frizer , Tamar : The Pious Sinner . 1991.

Author: Joseph Dan

Publisher: Mohr Siebeck

ISBN: 3161467981

Category: Religion

Page: 322

View: 341

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The main point delivered by this book is that Jews living in Germany during the Middle Ages developped a dynamic and variegated culture which should be recognized as a constituent of European and German medieval religiosity. The esoterics, mystics and pietists who produced works like those analyzed in this volume derived their inspiration from the traditional Jewish texts, but were also part of the world they lived in, despite the seclusions enforced by the religious prejudices of the time. The esoterical-mystical phenomena described were to a very large extent an original development in central-European Jewry, and constitute one of their most important contributions to Jewish culture as a whole. In some cases, a spiritual atmosphere reminiscent of early Protestant sects, which were to appear in the same regions three centuries later, can be discerned. Some of these texts influenced the Christian kabbalists of the sixteenth century, like Johannes Reuchlin and others. This is a major spiritual phenomenon which has been completely neglected until now, and it is hoped that this volume will contribute to a new appreciation of this aspect of European creativity in the Middle Ages.

With Reverence for the Word

Sexual Symbolism and Merkavah Speculation in Medieval Germany: A Study of the Sod haEgoz Texts. Tübingen: J. C. B. Mohr, 1997. Alonso-Fontela, Carlos, ed. “El Targum al Cantar de los Cantares (Edición Critica).

Author: Jane Dammen McAuliffe

Publisher: Oxford University Press

ISBN: 9780199890187

Category: Religion

Page: 512

View: 533

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This volume is the first trilateral exploration of medieval scriptural interpretation. The vast literature written during the medieval period is one of both great diversity and numerous cross-cultural similarities. These essays explore this rich heritage of biblical and qur'anic interpretation.

The Privileged Divine Feminine in Kabbalah

43, 418, 587; Daniel Abrams, Sexual Symbolism and Merkavah Speculation in Medieval Germany, 69–73; Abrams, “The Book of Illumination,” 111; Abrams, “Traces of the Lost Commentary to the Book of Creation by R. Jacob ben Jacob ha-Kohen” ...

Author: Moshe Idel

Publisher: Walter de Gruyter GmbH & Co KG

ISBN: 9783110599800

Category: Religion

Page: 260

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This volume addresses the complex topic of the preeminent status of the divine feminine power, to be referred also as Female, within the theosophical structures of many important Kabbalists, Sabbatean believers, and Hasidic masters. This privileged status is part of a much broader vision of the Female as stemming from a very high root within the divine world, then She was emanated and constitutes the tenth, lower divine power, and even in this lower state She is sometime conceived of governing this world and as equal to the divine Male. Finally, She is conceived of as returning to Her original place in special moments, the days of Sabbath, the Jewish Holidays or in the eschatological era. Her special dignity is sometime related to Her being the telos of creation, and as the first entity that emerged in the divine thought, which has been later on generated. In some cases, an uroboric theosophy links the Female Malkhut, directly to the first divine power, Keter. The author points to the possible impact of some of the Kabbalistic discussions on conceptualizations of the feminine in the Renaissance period.

Midrash VaYosha

Abrams , Daniel : Sexual Symbolism and Merkavah Speculation in Medieval Germany . 1997. Vol . 13 . Alexander - Frizer , Tamar : The Pious Sinner . 1991. Vol . 5 . Altmann , Alexander : Von der mittelalterlichen zur modernen Aufklärung .

Author: Rachel S. Mikva

Publisher: Mohr Siebeck

ISBN: 3161510097

Category: History

Page: 382

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Rachel S. Mikva undertakes a close examination of Midrash vaYosha, a medieval rabbinic text which explicates the Song at the Sea (Ex 15:1-18) and the events of the exodus from Egypt leading up to that climactic moment. Relatively short midrashim focusing on a brief biblical narrative or theme were composed in large numbers during the medieval period, and their extant manuscripts are sufficient in number to demonstrate the great popularity of the genre. Based on early manuscripts, two different recensions are transcribed and translated with significant annotation exploring variants, parallels, exegetical significance and literary style. A thorough historical analysis suggests that the midrash was performed as explication of the Torah reading at a certain point in its development - part of the gradual attenuation of live Targum. As Midrash vaYosha leaves the synagogue, its narrative dimension grows tremendously, yielding significant insight into the development of medieval Jewish exegesis.