Settler Colonialism in Victorian Literature

A transnational study of how settler colonialism remade the Victorian novel and political economy by challenging ideas of British identity.

Author: Philip Steer

Publisher: Cambridge University Press

ISBN: 9781108484428

Category: Literary Criticism

Page: 250

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A transnational study of how settler colonialism remade the Victorian novel and political economy by challenging ideas of British identity.

Nineteenth Century Emigration in British Literature and Art

Nineteenth-Century Settler Emigration in British Literature and Art is the first book to undertake a comprehensive survey of the literature produced by nineteenth-century settler emigration.

Author: Fariha Shaikh

Publisher: EUP

ISBN: 1474433693

Category:

Page: 256

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Demonstrates how the textual output of settler emigration shapes the nineteenth-century literary and artistic imagination Nineteenth-Century Settler Emigration in British Literature and Artis the first book to undertake a comprehensive survey of the literature produced by nineteenth-century settler emigration. Arguing that the demographic shift to settler colonies in Canada, Australia, New Zealand was supported and underpinned by a vast outpouring of text, this monograph brings printed emigrants' letters, manuscript shipboard newspapers and settler fiction into conversation with the works of Charles Dickens, Elizabeth Gaskell, Catherine Helen Spence and Ford Madox Brown, amongst others. The monograph demonstrates how the textual cultures of settler emigration pervaded the nineteenth-century cultural imagination and provided authors and artists with a means of interrogating representations of space and place, home-making and colonial encounters. Key features First study to make the case for the literature arising from nineteenth-century settler emigration as the distinct genre of 'emigration literature' Interdisciplinary approach combining literary criticism, art history and cultural geography Studies canonical authors and artists (Charles Dickens, Elizabeth Gaskell, Ford Madox Brown, James Collinson, Richard Redgrave, Abraham Solomon, and Thomas Webster) alongside ephemera, leading to an integrated and comprehensive study of settler culture

Domestic Fiction in Colonial Australia and New Zealand

This essay collection explores attitudes to colonialism, imperialism and race, as well as important developments in girlhood and the concept of the New Woman.

Author: Tamara S Wagner

Publisher: Routledge

ISBN: 9781317317401

Category: Literary Criticism

Page: 240

View: 287

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Colonial domestic literature has been largely overlooked and is due for a reassessment. This essay collection explores attitudes to colonialism, imperialism and race, as well as important developments in girlhood and the concept of the New Woman.

The Routledge Companion to Victorian Literature

in John Caldigate (1879)—have remained standard in discussions of how settler colonialism impacted on Victorian literature, and vice versa, how literary developments informed settler culture (Archibald; Piesse; Wagner).

Author: Dennis Denisoff

Publisher: Routledge

ISBN: 9780429018176

Category: Literary Criticism

Page: 540

View: 404

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The Routledge Companion to Victorian Literature offers 45 chapters by leading international scholars working with the most dynamic and influential political, cultural, and theoretical issues addressing Victorian literature today. Scholars and students will find this collection both useful and inspiring. Rigorously engaged with current scholarship that is both historically sensitive and theoretically informed, the Routledge Companion places the genres of the novel, poetry, and drama and issues of gender, social class, and race in conversation with subjects like ecology, colonialism, the Gothic, digital humanities, sexualities, disability, material culture, and animal studies. This guide is aimed at scholars who want to know the most significant critical approaches in Victorian studies, often written by the very scholars who helped found those fields. It addresses major theoretical movements such as narrative theory, formalism, historicism, and economic theory, as well as Victorian models of subjects such as anthropology, cognitive science, and religion. With its lists of key works, rich cross-referencing, extensive bibliographies, and explications of scholarly trajectories, the book is a crucial resource for graduate students and advanced undergraduates, while offering invaluable support to more seasoned scholars.

Mimicry and Display in Victorian Literary Culture

Autobiography, Sensation, and the Commodification of Identity in Victorian Narrative: Life upon the Exchange SEAN GRASS, Rochester Institute of Technology 122. Settler Colonialism in Victorian Literature: Economics and Political ...

Author: Will Abberley

Publisher: Cambridge University Press

ISBN: 9781108807548

Category: Literary Criticism

Page:

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Revealing the web of mutual influences between nineteenth-century scientific and cultural discourses of appearance, Mimicry and Display in Victorian Literary Culture argues that Victorian science and culture biologized appearance, reimagining imitation, concealment and self-presentation as evolutionary adaptations. Exploring how studies of animal crypsis and visibility drew on artistic theory and techniques to reconceptualise nature as a realm of signs and interpretation, Abberley shows that in turn, this science complicated religious views of nature as a text of divine meanings, inspiring literary authors to rethink human appearances and perceptions through a Darwinian lens. Providing fresh insights into writers from Alfred Russel Wallace and Thomas Hardy to Oscar Wilde and Charlotte Perkins Gilman, Abberley reveals how the biology of appearance generated new understandings of deception, identity and creativity; reacted upon narrative forms such as crime fiction and the pastoral; and infused the rhetoric of cultural criticism and political activism.

Colonial Law in India and the Victorian Imagination

... Sensation, and the Commodification of Identity in Victorian Narrative SEAN GRASS Settler Colonialism in Victorian Literature PHILLIP STEER Mimicry and Display in Victorian Literary Culture wILL ABBERLEy Victorian Women and Wayward ...

Author: Leila Neti

Publisher: Cambridge University Press

ISBN: 9781108837484

Category: Literary Criticism

Page: 230

View: 826

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Examines the shared cultural genealogy of popular Victorian novels and judicial opinions of the Privy Council.

Reimagining Dinosaurs in Late Victorian and Edwardian Literature

Settler Colonialism in Victorian Literature Economics and Political Identity in the Networks of Empire phillip steer, Massey University, Auckland 123. Mimicry and Display in Victorian Literary Culture Nature, Science and the ...

Author: Richard Fallon

Publisher: Cambridge University Press

ISBN: 9781108834001

Category: Literary Criticism

Page: 217

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Reimagining Dinosaurs argues that transatlantic popular literature was critical for transforming the dinosaur into a cultural icon between 1880 and 1920

Imagined Homelands

In tracing the histories of these poems and the poets who wrote them, this book provides an alternate account of nineteenth-century British poetry and, more broadly, of settler colonial culture.

Author: Jason R. Rudy

Publisher: JHU Press

ISBN: 9781421423937

Category: Literary Criticism

Page: 264

View: 523

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In tracing the histories of these poems and the poets who wrote them, this book provides an alternate account of nineteenth-century British poetry and, more broadly, of settler colonial culture.

Extraction Ecologies and the Literature of the Long Exhaustion

Steer, Philip. “Gold and Greater Britain: Jevons, Trollope, and Settler Colonialism.” Victorian Studies 58.3 (2016): 436–63. ———. Settler Colonialism in Victorian Literature: Economics and Political Identity in the Networks of Empire.

Author: Elizabeth Carolyn Miller

Publisher: Princeton University Press

ISBN: 9780691205533

Category: History

Page: 288

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How literature of the British imperial world contended with the social and environmental consequences of industrial mining The 1830s to the 1930s saw the rise of large-scale industrial mining in the British imperial world. Elizabeth Carolyn Miller examines how literature of this era reckoned with a new vision of civilization where humans are dependent on finite, nonrenewable stores of earthly resources, and traces how the threatening horizon of resource exhaustion worked its way into narrative form. Britain was the first nation to transition to industry based on fossil fuels, which put its novelists and other writers in the remarkable position of mediating the emergence of extraction-based life. Miller looks at works like Hard Times, The Mill on the Floss, and Sons and Lovers, showing how the provincial realist novel’s longstanding reliance on marriage and inheritance plots transforms against the backdrop of exhaustion to withhold the promise of reproductive futurity. She explores how adventure stories like Treasure Island and Heart of Darkness reorient fictional space toward the resource frontier. And she shows how utopian and fantasy works like “Sultana’s Dream,” The Time Machine, and The Hobbit offer imaginative ways of envisioning energy beyond extractivism. This illuminating book reveals how an era marked by violent mineral resource rushes gave rise to literary forms and genres that extend extractivism as a mode of environmental understanding.