Radium and the Secret of Life

Tracer isotopes would unveil the secrets of life itself!” Indeed, as one CBS radio program announced: “When you get deeper and deeper into the secrets of life, you find them so fascinating you sometimes forget that the atom can kill.

Author: Luis A. Campos

Publisher: University of Chicago Press

ISBN: 9780226238272

Category: Science

Page: 378

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Long before the hydrogen bomb indelibly associated radioactivity with death, many chemists, physicists, botanists, and geneticists were excited thinking that radium held the key to the secret of life. Luis Campos examines the many and varied connections between early radioactivity research and understandings of vitality, both scientific and popular, in the first half of the twentieth century. As some physicists and chemists early on described the wondrous new element and its radioactive brethren in lifelike terms ( decay, half-life, and frequent reference to the natural selection and evolution of the elements), many biologists of the period eagerly sought to bring radium into the biological fold. They did so with experiments aimed at elucidating some of the most basic phenomena of life, including metabolism and mutation, and often saw in these phenomena properties that in turn reminded them of the new element. These initially provocative links between radium and life proved remarkably productive in experimental terms and ultimately led to key biological insights into the origin of life, the nature of mutation, and the structure of the gene. "Radium and the Secret of Life" traces the half-life of this connection between the living and the radioactive, while also exploring the approach to history that emerges when one follows a trail of associations that, asymptotically, never quite disappears."

Radium and the Secret of Life

"Radium and the Secret of Life" traces the half-life of this connection between the living and the radioactive, while also exploring the approach to history that emerges when one follows a trail of associations that, asymptotically, never ...

Author: Luis A. Campos

Publisher: University of Chicago Press

ISBN: 9780226418742

Category: Science

Page: 386

View: 956

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Long before the hydrogen bomb indelibly associated radioactivity with death, many chemists, physicists, botanists, and geneticists were excited thinking that radium held the key to the secret of life. Luis Campos examines the many and varied connections between early radioactivity research and understandings of vitality, both scientific and popular, in the first half of the twentieth century. As some physicists and chemists early on described the wondrous new element and its radioactive brethren in lifelike terms ( decay, half-life, and frequent reference to the natural selection and evolution of the elements), many biologists of the period eagerly sought to bring radium into the biological fold. They did so with experiments aimed at elucidating some of the most basic phenomena of life, including metabolism and mutation, and often saw in these phenomena properties that in turn reminded them of the new element. These initially provocative links between radium and life proved remarkably productive in experimental terms and ultimately led to key biological insights into the origin of life, the nature of mutation, and the structure of the gene. "Radium and the Secret of Life" traces the half-life of this connection between the living and the radioactive, while also exploring the approach to history that emerges when one follows a trail of associations that, asymptotically, never quite disappears."

The Secret of Life

As a result of Dr. Furnivall's strictures on radium treatment a long correspondence followed in the columns of the British Medical Journal . Undaunted by the lamentable experience of this eminent surgeon , some stalwarts in the radium ...

Author: Georges Lakhovsky

Publisher: Health Research Books

ISBN: 0787305227

Category: Electrophysiology

Page: 227

View: 165

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1936 Cosmic rays & radiations & radiations of living beings. Contents: Problem of Instinct of Special Sense in Animals; Auto-Electrification in Living Beings; Universal Nature of Radiation in Living Beings; on Radiations in General & on Electro-Magn.

Radiation Evangelists

... Trafficking Materials and Gendered Experimental Practices; Rentetzi, “U.S. Radium Industry”; Walker, Permissible Dose; Hayter, Element of Hope; Campos, Radium and the Secret of Life; Mullner, Deadly Glow; Clark, Radium Girls; ...

Author: Jeffrey Womack

Publisher: University of Pittsburgh Press

ISBN: 9780822987437

Category: Medical

Page: 228

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Radiation Evangelists explores X-ray and radium therapy in the United States and Great Britain during a crucial period of its development, from 1896 to 1925. It focuses on the pioneering work of early advocates in the field, the “radiation evangelists” who, motivated by their faith in a new technology, trust in new energy sources, and hope for future breakthroughs, turned a blind eye to the dangers of radiation exposure. Although ionizing radiation effectively treated diseases like skin infections and cancers, radiation therapists—who did not need a medical education to develop or administer procedures or sell tonics containing radium—operated in a space of uncertainty about exactly how radiation worked or would affect human bodies. And yet radium, once a specialized medical treatment, would eventually become a consumer health product associated with the antibacterial properties of sunlight. This book raises important questions about medical experimentation and the so-called Golden Rule of medical ethics, issues of safety and professional identity, and the temptation of a powerful therapeutic tool that also posed significant risks in its formative years. In this cautionary tale of technological medical progress, Jeffrey Womack reveals how practitioners and their patients accepted uncertainty as a condition of their therapy in an attempt to alleviate human suffering.

Life s Edge

Radium and the Secret of Life.” PhD dissertation, Harvard University. Campos, Luis. 2007. “The Birth of Living Radium.” Representations 97:1–27. Campos, Luis. 2015. Radium and the Secret of Life. Chicago: University of Chicago Press.

Author: Carl Zimmer

Publisher: Pan Macmillan

ISBN: 9781529069440

Category: Science

Page: 480

View: 309

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This book is not just about life, but about discovery itself. It is about error and hubris, but also about wonder and the reach of science. And it is bookended with the ultimate question: How do we define the thing that defines us? - Siddhartha Mukherjee, author of The Gene We all assume we know what life is, but the more scientists learn about the living world – from protocells to brains, from zygotes to pandemic viruses – the harder they find it is to locate the edges of life, where it begins and ends. What exactly does it mean to be alive? Is a virus alive? Is a foetus? Carl Zimmer investigates one of the biggest questions of all: What is life? The answer seems obvious until you try to seriously answer it. Is the apple sitting on your kitchen counter alive, or is only the apple tree it came from deserving of the word? If we can’t answer that question here on earth, how will we know when and if we discover alien life on other worlds? The question hangs over some of society’s most charged conflicts – whether a fertilized egg is a living person, for example, and when we ought to declare a person legally dead. Life’s Edge is an utterly fascinating investigation by one of the most celebrated science writers of our time. Zimmer journeys through the strange experiments that have attempted to recreate life. Literally hundreds of definitions of what that should look like now exist, but none has yet emerged as an obvious winner. Lists of what living things have in common do not add up to a theory of life. It’s never clear why some items on the list are essential and others not. Coronaviruses have altered the course of history, and yet many scientists maintain they are not alive. Chemists are creating droplets that can swarm, sense their environment, and multiply. Have they made life in the lab? Whether he is handling pythons in Alabama or searching for hibernating bats in the Adirondacks, Zimmer revels in astounding examples of life at its most bizarre. He tries his own hand at evolving life in a test tube with unnerving results. Charting the obsession with Dr Frankenstein’s monster and how Coleridge came to believe the whole universe was alive, Zimmer leads us all the way into the labs and minds of researchers working on engineering life from the ground up.

Life Atomic

risks and the therapeutic possibilities of new radiation sources dated to observations with x-rays and then radium. ... Some patent medicine included radium in the 1920s. ... Radium and the Secret of Life (2006). 17.

Author: Angela N. H. Creager

Publisher: University of Chicago Press

ISBN: 9780226017945

Category: Science

Page: 448

View: 507

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After World War II, the US Atomic Energy Commission (AEC) began mass-producing radioisotopes, sending out nearly 64,000 shipments of radioactive materials to scientists and physicians by 1955. Even as the atomic bomb became the focus of Cold War anxiety, radioisotopes represented the government’s efforts to harness the power of the atom for peace—advancing medicine, domestic energy, and foreign relations. In Life Atomic, Angela N. H. Creager tells the story of how these radioisotopes, which were simultaneously scientific tools and political icons, transformed biomedicine and ecology. Government-produced radioisotopes provided physicians with new tools for diagnosis and therapy, specifically cancer therapy, and enabled biologists to trace molecular transformations. Yet the government’s attempt to present radioisotopes as marvelous dividends of the atomic age was undercut in the 1950s by the fallout debates, as scientists and citizens recognized the hazards of low-level radiation. Creager reveals that growing consciousness of the danger of radioactivity did not reduce the demand for radioisotopes at hospitals and laboratories, but it did change their popular representation from a therapeutic agent to an environmental poison. She then demonstrates how, by the late twentieth century, public fear of radioactivity overshadowed any appreciation of the positive consequences of the AEC’s provision of radioisotopes for research and medicine.

Half Lives

expensive cocktails and elegant patrons playing roulette using a radium-painted roulette wheel, and green glowing chips. This may be rather fanciful but it was ... Radium and the Secret Life, University of Chicago Press, 2015, p. 42. 5.

Author: Lucy Jane Santos

Publisher: Icon Books

ISBN: 9781785786082

Category: Science

Page: 336

View: 219

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'Half Lives shines a light on the shocking history of the world's toxic love affair with a deadly substance, radium. Unnerving, fascinating, informative and truly frightening.' Hallie Rubenhold, author of The Five Lucy Jane Santos presents the surprising history of radium in everyday life. Of all the radioactive elements discovered at the end of the 19th century, it was radium that became the focus of both public fascination and entrepreneurial zeal. Half Lives tells the fascinating, curious, sometimes macabre story of the element through its ascendance as a desirable item – a present for a queen, a prize in a treasure hunt, a glow-in- the-dark dance costume – to its role as a supposed cure-all in everyday 20th-century life, when medical practitioners and business people (reputable and otherwise) devised ingenious ways of commodifying the new wonder element, and enthusiastic customers welcomed their radioactive wares into their homes. Historian Lucy Jane Santos – herself the proud owner of a formidable collection of radium beauty treatments – delves into the stories of these products and details the gradual downfall and discredit of the radium industry through the eyes of the people who bought, sold and eventually came to fear the once-fetishized substance. She reveals a new history of radium, one in which the stories of those previously dismissed as quacks and fools are brought to life, as part of a unique examination of the interplay between science and popular culture. 'In Half Lives, Lucy Santos transports us back to a time when consumers wondered whether mixing radium into chicken feed might result in eggs that could hard-boil themselves; when diners cheerfully drank radioactive cocktails that glowed in the dark; and when people used toothpaste containing lethal thorium oxide in the pursuit of healthy gums. Santos unpicks fact from fiction and exhibits a masterful grasp of a complex area of science history that is so often mistold. Half Lives is a delightfully disturbing book that reminds us all of the age-old Latin maxim, 'caveat emptor.' Dr Lindsey Fitzharris, bestselling author of The Butchering Art 'With verve and vivacity, Lucy Jane Santos conducts her readers on a unique tour of the twentieth century's most significant scientific discovery. Before the R-word threatened destruction, it offered hope for the future -- teeth would glow white, cocktails would shine in the dark and cancer would be vanquished. This evocative account puts people and their emotions centre-stage of science's past.' Dr Patricia Fara

A History of the Future

For the photograph, see Conquest, 2 (August 1921): 436; and for more details, see Nancy Knight, '“The New Light”: X Rays and Medical Futurism'; on radium, see Louis A. Campos, Radium and the Secret of Life. For surveys, see Low, ...

Author: Peter J. Bowler

Publisher: Cambridge University Press

ISBN: 9781108548649

Category: Technology & Engineering

Page:

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In this wide-ranging survey, Peter J. Bowler explores the phenomenon of futurology: predictions about the future development and impact of science and technology on society and culture in the twentieth century. Utilising science fiction, popular science literature and the novels of the literary elite, Bowler highlights contested responses to the potential for revolutionary social change brought about by real and imagined scientific innovations. Charting the effect of social and military developments on attitudes towards innovation in Europe and America, Bowler shows how conflict between the enthusiasm of technocrats and the pessimism of their critics was presented to the public in books, magazines and exhibitions, and on the radio and television. A series of case studies reveals the impact of technologies such as radio, aviation, space exploration and genetics, exploring rivalries between innovators and the often unexpected outcome of their efforts to produce mechanisms and machines that could change the world.

Heredity Explored

Radium and the Secret of Life. Chicago: University of Chicago Press. Demerec, Milislav. 1959. Albert Francis Blakeslee. Genetics 44:1–4. “Department of Genetics.” 1921. Carnegie Institution of Washington (CIW) Year Book 20:101–156.

Author: Staffan Müller-Wille

Publisher: MIT Press

ISBN: 9780262034432

Category: Science

Page: 480

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Investigations of how the understanding of heredity developed in scientific, medical, agro-industrial, and political contexts of the late nineteenth and early twentieth centuries.

Synthetic Biology

Campos L (2006a) “The Birth of Living Radium.” Representations 97: 1–29 Campos L (2006b) Radium and the Secret of Life. Harvard University, Department of The History of Science, Ph.D. dissertation Carlson R (2001) “Biological Technology ...

Author: Markus Schmidt

Publisher: Springer Science & Business Media

ISBN: 9048126789

Category: Medical

Page: 186

View: 805

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Synthetic biology is becoming one of the most dynamic new fields of biology, with the potential to revolutionize the way we do biotechnology today. By applying the toolbox of engineering disciplines to biology, a whole set of potential applications become possible ranging very widely across scientific and engineering disciplines. Some of the potential benefits of synthetic biology, such as the development of low-cost drugs or the production of chemicals and energy by engineered bacteria are enormous. There are, however, also potential and perceived risks due to deliberate or accidental damage. Also, ethical issues of synthetic biology just start being explored, with hardly any ethicists specifically focusing on the area of synthetic biology. This book will be the first of its kind focusing particularly on the safety, security and ethical concerns and other relevant societal aspects of this new emerging field. The foreseen impact of this book will be to stimulate a debate on these societal issues at an early stage. Past experiences, especially in the field of GM-crops and stem cells, have shown the importance of an early societal debate. The community and informed stakeholders recognize this need, but up to now discussions are fragmentary. This book will be the first comprehensive overview on relevant societal issues of synthetic biology, setting the scene for further important discussions within the scientific community and with civil society.

Radiation Nation

After its initial discovery in 1898, physicists, biologists, and botanists saw radium as an elixir that held the “secret of life.” “Atomic literally meant that which could not be subdivided,” writes historian of science Luis Campos.

Author: Natasha Zaretsky

Publisher: Columbia University Press

ISBN: 9780231542487

Category: History

Page:

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On March 28, 1979, the worst nuclear reactor accident in U.S. history occurred at the Three Mile Island power plant in Central Pennsylvania. Radiation Nation tells the story of what happened that day and in the months and years that followed, as local residents tried to make sense of the emergency. The near-meltdown occurred at a pivotal moment when the New Deal coalition was unraveling, trust in government was eroding, conservatives were consolidating their power, and the political left was becoming marginalized. Using the accident to explore this turning point, Natasha Zaretsky provides a fresh interpretation of the era by disclosing how atomic and ecological imaginaries shaped the conservative ascendancy. Drawing on the testimony of the men and women who lived in the shadow of the reactor, Radiation Nation shows that the region's citizens, especially its mothers, grew convinced that they had sustained radiological injuries that threatened their reproductive futures. Taking inspiration from the antiwar, environmental, and feminist movements, women at Three Mile Island crafted a homegrown ecological politics that wove together concerns over radiological threats to the body, the struggle over abortion and reproductive rights, and eroding trust in authority. This politics was shaped above all by what Zaretsky calls "biotic nationalism," a new body-centered nationalism that imagined the nation as a living, mortal being and portrayed sickened Americans as evidence of betrayal. The first cultural history of the accident, Radiation Nation reveals the surprising ecological dimensions of post-Vietnam conservatism while showing how growing anxieties surrounding bodily illness infused the political realignment of the 1970s in ways that blurred any easy distinction between left and right.

Little Journeys to the Homes of Great Philosophers

Every good thing in life is dual, and through this natural and spontaneous marriage of radium and electricity, we get very close to the secret of life. As the sun is the giver of life and death, so by the use of the salts of radium have ...

Author: Elbert Hubbard

Publisher: BoD – Books on Demand

ISBN: 9783752371772

Category: Fiction

Page: 212

View: 838

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Reproduction of the original: Little Journeys to the Homes of Great Philosophers by Elbert Hubbard

A Radiant Affair

History and fiction intertwine in this untold tale of Marie Curie’s love affair with physicist Paul Langevin, as seen through the eyes of Marie’s favorite graduate student, George Fournier.

Author: Donald R. Maxwell

Publisher: Strategic Book Publishing & Rights Agency

ISBN: 9781631352355

Category: Fiction

Page: 360

View: 638

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History and fiction intertwine in this untold tale of Marie Curie’s love affair with physicist Paul Langevin, as seen through the eyes of Marie’s favorite graduate student, George Fournier. Intertwined in the plot, set in Paris of the early 1900s, is Fournier’s youthful infatuation with the young Marie. In his memoir, George Fournier recalls meeting the young and beautiful Marie on her arrival as a new instructor at the Sevres Lycee, where he was a student. A few years later, George does well on his final exams in physics at the University of Paris, and the now widowed Marie Curie accepts him as a graduate student in her laboratory. One day, George sees Marie scurrying to a small apartment with Paul Langevin, a brilliant young physicist who is married. An intruder into the Curie-Langevin love nest steals Marie’s letters to Paul and has them published in the Parisian press. Langevin’s wife, Jeanne, threatens Marie with violence and aggressively attempts to break up the love affair that jeopardizes her marriage and the security of their four young children. In an attempt to provide Madame Curie with protection, Professor Jean Perrin, a long-time friend of the Curies, asks George Fournier to become Marie Curie’s confidential protector, a role placing the love-struck George in a close yet secretive relationship with Marie. As far as possible, details of Marie Curie’s life and relationships, as well as information on the other major characters are historically accurate.

Life and Death Rays

5.4 RADIUM, THE ELEMENT OF LIFE AND DEATH If X-rays had taken the world by storm, then radioactivity created a whirlwind. ... Many scientists and botanists considered that this half-living element held the key to the secret of life.

Author: Alan Perkins

Publisher: CRC Press

ISBN: 9781000406719

Category: Science

Page: 246

View: 591

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This unique book provides an accessible introduction to both the scientific background and the key people involved in the discovery and use of radiation and radioactivity. It begins by providing a short history of radiation exposures and radiation poisoning; from the early inappropriate use of X-rays and radium cures through the misadventures of the Manhattan Project and the Chernobyl disaster, to the high-profile and deliberate poisoning of Alexander Litvinenko in London with polonium-210, which gave rise to worldwide media attention. The chapters provide a catalogue of deliberate criminal acts, unfortunate accidents, and inadvertent radiation exposures, exploring well-known events in detail, as well as some not so well-known occurrences. It works through the topics by focusing on human stories and events and their biological impact. In addition, it covers descriptions of the beneficial uses of radiation and radioactivity. This book can be enjoyed by any reader with a general interest in science, as well as by students and professionals within the scientific and medical communities. Key features Authored by a subject area specialist who has worked in both clinical practice and academia and was involved with the national media following incidents of national and international importance Provides a unique human perspective into well-known and some lesser known events and a concise history of the discovery of radiation and the events that followed Adds scientific and medical background to a subject of high media interest

Nuclear Fear

Radium proved a help in reducing certain skin cancers and tumors, for if the rays were harmful to ordinary flesh, ... Radioactivity might not only stimulate health but reflect a vitality stirring within all matter, the "Secret of Life.

Author: Spencer R. WEART

Publisher: Harvard University Press

ISBN: 9780674044982

Category: Science

Page: 552

View: 117

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Our thinking is inhabited by images-images of sometimes curious and overwhelming power. The mushroom cloud, weird rays that can transform the flesh, the twilight world following a nuclear war, the white city of the future, the brilliant but mad scientist who plots to destroy the world-all these images and more relate to nuclear energy, but that is not their only common bond. Decades before the first atom bomb exploded, a web of symbols with surprising linkages was fully formed in the public mind. The strange kinship of these symbols can be traced back, not only to medieval symbolism, but still deeper into experiences common to all of us. This is a disturbing book: it shows that much of what we believe about nuclear energy is not based on facts, but on a complex tangle of imagery suffused with emotions and rooted in the distant past. Nuclear Fear is the first work to explore all the symbolism attached to nuclear bombs, and to civilian nuclear energy as well, employing the powerful tools of history as well as findings from psychology, sociology, and even anthropology. The story runs from the turn of the century to the present day, following the scientists and journalists, the filmmakers and novelists, the officials and politicians of many nations who shaped the way people think about nuclear devices. The author, a historian who also holds a Ph.D. in physics, has been able to separate genuine scientific knowledge about nuclear energy and radiation from the luxuriant mythology that obscures them. In revealing the history of nuclear imagery, Weart conveys the hopeful message that once we understand how this imagery has secretly influenced history and our own thinking, we can move on to a clearer view of the choices that confront our civilization. Table of Contents: Preface Part One: Years of Fantasy, 1902-1938 1. Radioactive Hopes White Cities of the Future Missionaries for Science The Meaning of Transmutation 2. Radioactive Fears Scientific Doomsdays The Dangerous Scientist Scientists and Weapons Debating the Scientist's Role 3. Radium: Elixir or Poison? The Elixir of Life Rays of Life Death Rays Radium as Medicine and Poison 4. The Secret, the Master, and the Monster Smashing Atoms The Fearful Master Monsters and Victims Real Scientists The Situation before Fission Part Two: Confronting Reality, 1939-1952 5. Where Earth and Heaven Meet Imaginary Bomb-Reactors Real Reactors and Safety Questions Planned Massacres "The Second Coming" 6. The News from Hiroshima Cliché Experts Hiroshima Itself Security through Control by Scientists? Security through Control over Scientists? 7. National Defenses Civil Defenses Bombs as a Psychological Weapon The Airmen Part Three: New Hopes and Horrors, 1953-1963 8. Atoms for Peace A Positive Alternative Atomic Propaganda Abroad Atomic Propaganda at Home 9. Good and Bad Atoms Magical Atoms Real Reactors The Core of Mistrust Tainted Authorities 10. The New Blasphemy Bombs as a Violation of Nature Radioactive Monsters Blaming Authorities 11. Death Dust Crusaders against Contamination A Few Facts Clean or Filthy Bombs? 12. The Imagination of Survival Visions of the End Survivors as Savages The Victory of the Victim The Great Thermonuclear Strategy Debate The World as Hiroshima 13. The Politics of Survival The Movement Attacking the Warriors Running for Shelter Cuban Catharsis Reasons for Silence Part Four: Suspect Technology, 1956-1986 14. Fail/Safe Unwanted Explosions: Bombs Unwanted Explosions: Reactors Advertising the Maximum Accident 15. Reactor Poisons and Promises Pollution from Reactors The Public Loses Interest The Nuplex versus the China Syndrome 16. The Debate Explodes The Fight against Antimissiles Sounding the Radiation Alarm Reactors: A Surrogate for Bombs? Environmentalists Step In 17. Energy Choices Alternative Energy Sources Real Reactor Risks "It's Political" The Reactor Wars 18. Civilization or Liberation? The Logic of Authority and Its Enemies Nature versus Culture Modes of Expression The Public's Image of Nuclear Power 19. The War Fear Revival: An Unfinished Chapter Part Five The Search for Renewal 20. The Modern Arcanum Despair and Denial Help from Heaven? Objects in the Skies Mushroom and Mandala 21. Artistic Transmutations The Interior Holocaust Rebirth from Despair Toward the Four-Gated City Conclusion A Personal Note Sources and Methodology Notes Index Reviews of this book: Nuclear Fear is a rich, layered journey back through our 'atomic history' to the primal memories of monstrous mutants and mad scientists. It is a deeply serious book but written in an accessible style that reveals the culture in which this fear emerges only to be suppressed and emerge again. --Ellen Goodman, Boston Globe Reviews of this book: A historical portrait of the quintessential modern nightmare...Weart shows in meticulous and fascinating detail how [the] ancient images of alchemy-fire, sexuality, Armageddon, gold, eternity and all the rest-immediately clustered around the new science of atomic physics...There is no question that the image of nuclear power reflects a complex and deeply disturbing portrait of what it means to be human. --Stephan Salisbury, Philadelphia Inquirer Reviews of this book: A detailed, probing study of American hopes, dreams and insecurities in the twentieth-century. Weart has a poet's acumen for sensing human feelings ... Nuclear Fear remains captivating as history...and original as an anthropological study of how nuclear power, like alchemy in medieval times, offers a convenient symbol for deeply-rooted human feelings. --Los Angeles Times Reviews of this book: Weart's tale boldly sweeps from the futuristic White City of the 1893 Chicago World's Fair and the discovery of radioactivity in 1896 through Hiroshima and Star Wars... (An] admirable call for synthesis of art and science in a true transmutation that takes us beyond nuclear fear. --H. Bruce Franklin, Science

Secret of Regeneration

Students of Orthopathy know that Life does not grow any more th that gravity grows , or that Electricity grows . ... “ Every second for as long as the radium lasts , a definite percentage of these radium atoms explodes .

Author: Hilton Hotema

Publisher: Health Research Books

ISBN: 0787304298

Category:

Page: 434

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1963 Each lesson of this marvelous course grows more and more interesting. it is a most remarkable and revolutionary body of information. the following facts are revealed. That man did not evolve from the ape, but degenerated from a previous race of Su.

Secrets of the Past Nuclear Energy Applications in Art and Archaeology

Thus , a modern sample of lead , that is , lead produced only a few lead - 210 half - lives ago , will exhibit a difference between the concentrations of radioactivity of lead - 210 and radium - 226 that it contains .

Author: Bernard Keisch

Publisher:

ISBN: UOM:39015001300154

Category: Painting

Page: 119

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Describes the ways in which nuclear science can be used to aid in the study of art and archaeology, with emphasis on its use in identifying and dating objects.

The Secret Life of the Periodic Table

1899 – A.-L. Debierne Actinium 89 S \, * L * * * o - - *- = * o - = s * - - * - o or - While sifting through the dregs left by Pierre and Marie Curie after their discovery of radium, Frenchman André-Louis Debierne discovered a new ...

Author: Dr Ben Still

Publisher: Hachette UK

ISBN: 9781844039104

Category: Science

Page: 192

View: 884

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Every element has character, be it volatile, aloof, gregarious or enigmatic. They also have incredible stories of how they came to be, how they were discovered and how their qualities have been harnessed to make everything we have in the world. The Secret Life of the Periodic Table gives a fascinating insight into the discovery and use of all 118 elements. It uncovers incredible stories of how Mendeleev's table was formulated and the individual elements found, as well as explaining the fundamentals of atomic science and each element's place in the table and our universe.

The Wretched Atom

Radium enthusiasts at the dawn of the twentieth century had imagined it held the secret to health and long life, yet the radium tonics sold to the wealthy made them sick or killed them. English scientist John Butler Burke claimed in ...

Author: Jacob Darwin Hamblin

Publisher: Oxford University Press

ISBN: 9780197526903

Category: History

Page: 328

View: 947

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Written by a prize-winning historian, The Wretched Atom is an authoritative history and a sweeping indictment of so-called peaceful nuclear technologies in the countries of the developing world.