Popular Music Censorship in Africa

This volume brings together the latest research on censorship in colonial and post-colonial Africa, focusing on the attempts to censor musicians and the strategies of resistance devised by musicians in their struggles to be heard.

Author: Martin Cloonan

Publisher: Routledge

ISBN: 9781317078074

Category: Music

Page: 242

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In Africa, tension between freedom of expression and censorship in many contexts remains as contentious, if not more so, than during the period of colonial rule which permeated the twentieth century. Over the last one hundred years popular musicians have not been free to sing about whatever they wish to, and in many countries they are still not free to do so. This volume brings together the latest research on censorship in colonial and post-colonial Africa, focusing on the attempts to censor musicians and the strategies of resistance devised by musicians in their struggles to be heard. For Africa, the twentieth century was characterized first and foremost by struggles for independence, as colonizer and colonized struggled for territorial control. Throughout this period culture was an important contested terrain in hegemonic and counter-hegemonic struggles and many musicians who aligned themselves with independence movements viewed music as an important cultural weapon. Musical messages were often political, opposing the injustices of colonial rule. Colonial governments reacted to counter-hegemonic songs through repression, banning songs from distribution and/or broadcast, while often targeting the musicians with acts of intimidation in an attempt to silence them. In the post-independence era a disturbing trend has occurred, in which African governments have regularly continued to practise censorship of musicians. However, not all attempts to silence musicians have emanated from government, nor has all contested music been strictly political. Religious and moral rationale has also featured prominently in censorship struggles. Both Christian and Muslim fundamentalism has led to extreme attempts to silence musicians. In response, musicians have often sought ways of getting their music and message heard, despite censorship and harassment. The book includes a special section on case studies that highlight issues of nationality.

Popular Music Censorship in Africa

Popular. Music. Censorship. in. Africa. An. Overview. Martin Cloonan DOI: 10.4324/9781315601427-1. Introduction. In recent years various histories of music censorship have been written about a number of places, most notably in the ...

Author: Martin Cloonan

Publisher: Routledge

ISBN: 9781317078067

Category: Music

Page: 263

View: 709

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In Africa, tension between freedom of expression and censorship in many contexts remains as contentious, if not more so, than during the period of colonial rule which permeated the twentieth century. Over the last one hundred years popular musicians have not been free to sing about whatever they wish to, and in many countries they are still not free to do so. This volume brings together the latest research on censorship in colonial and post-colonial Africa, focusing on the attempts to censor musicians and the strategies of resistance devised by musicians in their struggles to be heard. For Africa, the twentieth century was characterized first and foremost by struggles for independence, as colonizer and colonized struggled for territorial control. Throughout this period culture was an important contested terrain in hegemonic and counter-hegemonic struggles and many musicians who aligned themselves with independence movements viewed music as an important cultural weapon. Musical messages were often political, opposing the injustices of colonial rule. Colonial governments reacted to counter-hegemonic songs through repression, banning songs from distribution and/or broadcast, while often targeting the musicians with acts of intimidation in an attempt to silence them. In the post-independence era a disturbing trend has occurred, in which African governments have regularly continued to practise censorship of musicians. However, not all attempts to silence musicians have emanated from government, nor has all contested music been strictly political. Religious and moral rationale has also featured prominently in censorship struggles. Both Christian and Muslim fundamentalism has led to extreme attempts to silence musicians. In response, musicians have often sought ways of getting their music and message heard, despite censorship and harassment. The book includes a special section on case studies that highlight issues of nationality.

The Oxford Handbook of Music Censorship

“Aesopian Strategies of Textual Resistance in the Struggle to Overcome the Censorship of Popular Music in Apartheid South Africa.” In Censorship and Cultural Regulation in the Modern Age, edited by B. Müller, 189–207.

Author: Patricia Ann Hall

Publisher: Oxford University Press

ISBN: 9780199733163

Category: Music

Page: 709

View: 294

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"Addresses censorship as a worldwide issue from its earliest recorded form to the modern day ; Includes unique case studies of music censorship unfamiliar to Western audiences ; Documents censorship through a necessarily intersectional lens." --Oxford University Press.

Indigenous African Popular Music Volume 2

He then charged the people to resist such oppressive leadership, citing instances with Rhodesia and South Africa as two African nations which had ... In M. Drewett & M. Clooman (Eds.), Popular music censorship in Africa (pp. 39–52).

Author: Abiodun Salawu

Publisher: Springer Nature

ISBN: 9783030987053

Category: Music

Page: 465

View: 155

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This volume examines how African indigenous popular music is deployed in democracy, politics and for social crusades by African artists. Exploring the role of indigenous African popular music in environmental health communication and gender empowerment, it subsequently focuses on how the music portrays the African future, its use by African youths, and how it is affected by advanced broadcast technologies and the digital media. Indigenous African popular music has long been under-appreciated in communication scholarship. However, understanding the nature and philosophies of indigenous African popular music reveals an untapped diversity which can only be unraveled by the knowledge of myriad cultural backgrounds from which its genres originate. With a particular focus on scholarship from Nigeria, Zimbabwe and South Africa, this volume explores how, during the colonial period and post-independence dispensation, indigenous African music genres and their artists were mainstreamed in order to tackle emerging issues, to sensitise Africans about the affairs of their respective nations and to warn African leaders who have failed and are failing African citizenry about the plight of the people. At the same time, indigenous African popular music genres have served as a beacon to the teeming African youths to express their dreams, frustrations about their environments and to represent themselves. This volume explores how, through the advent of new media technologies, indigenous African popular musicians have been working relentlessly for indigenous production, becoming champions of good governance, marginalised population, and repositories of indigenous cultural traditions and cosmologies.

Researching Music Censorship

Music is a powerhouse, imbued with meaning in its lyrics (for song) that address issues that affect society, and in its performance that has ... In Popular Music Censorship in Africa, edited by Michael Drewett and Martin Cloonan, 3–22.

Author: Helmi Järviluoma

Publisher: Cambridge Scholars Publishing

ISBN: 9781443878678

Category: Music

Page: 345

View: 394

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Freedom of expression and its direct counterpart, censorship and silencing, are increasingly gaining attention in the world of art and culture. Through the growth of social media and its worldwide distribution, arts and cultural products are shared, and the increased visibility and audibility of culture is highlighted through iconic and pivotal clashes, such as the fatwa on The Satanic Verses in 1989, the recurring bans on the music of Wagner, the alleged censorship of playlists following 9/11, and the cartoon crisis in 2006. This volume takes the discussion directly to the field of music studies in a broad frame and insists on examining music censorship in a global perspective. The book addresses the important and increasingly relevant issue of scholarship on music censorship and thus contributes to a detailed understanding of the phenomenon. Often, words and semantic meaning are held to be determining to the restrictions on musicians and singers, but as this collection documents, the reasons for censorship might not always be found in verbal messages. Rather, the positioning of a more broad understanding of why and how music can convey meaning and accordingly trigger censorship and bans is at the heart of this work. The complexity of music censorship includes historical, structural as well as emotional ‘listenings’ and interpretations of sound. The topic, accordingly, is political, as well as scholarly urgent.

Indigenous African Popular Music Volume 1

Let this place be your stepping stone, as you climb to the top, For what one prays for is for one's child to come out and be greater than one. ... In M. Drewatt & M. Cloonan (Eds.), Popular music censorship in Africa (pp. 91–106).

Author: Abiodun Salawu

Publisher: Springer Nature

ISBN: 9783030978846

Category: Music

Page: 411

View: 742

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This volume explores the nature, philosophies and genres of indigenous African popular music, focusing on how indigenous African popular music artistes are seen as prophets and philosophers, and how indigenous African popular music depicts the world. Indigenous African popular music has long been under-appreciated in communication scholarship. However, understanding the nature and philosophies of indigenous African popular music reveals an untapped diversity which only be unraveled by knowledge of the myriad cultural backgrounds from which its genres originate. Indigenous African popular musicians have become repositories of indigenous cultural traditions and cosmologies.With a particular focus on scholarship from Nigeria, Zimbabwe and South Africa, this volume explores the work of these pioneering artists and their protégés who are resiliently sustaining, recreating and popularising indigenous popular music in their respective African communities, and at the same time propagating the communal views about African philosophies and the temporal and spiritual worlds in which they exist. ​

The Routledge History of Social Protest in Popular Music

Martin Cloonan, “Popular Music Censorship in Africa: An Overview,” in Michael Drewett and Martin Cloonan, eds., Popular Music Censorship in Africa (Hampshire: Ashgate, 2006), 10. 25. Sousa, “Rap guineense.” 26.

Author: Jonathan C. Friedman

Publisher: Routledge

ISBN: 9781136447280

Category: History

Page: 432

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The major objective of this collection of 28 essays is to analyze the trends, musical formats, and rhetorical devices used in popular music to illuminate the human condition. By comparing and contrasting musical offerings in a number of countries and in different contexts from the 19th century until today, The Routledge History of Social Protest in Popular Music aims to be a probing introduction to the history of social protest music, ideal for popular music studies and history and sociology of music courses.

The Bloomsbury Handbook of Religion and Popular Music

A leading international figure in sociological studies of popular music and youth culture, he has written and edited ... He is co-editor (with Martin Cloonan) of Popular Music Censorship in Africa (Ashgate 2006) and (with Sarah Hill and ...

Author: Christopher Partridge

Publisher: Bloomsbury Publishing

ISBN: 9781474237345

Category: Religion

Page: 440

View: 174

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The Bloomsbury Handbook of Religion and Popular Music is the first comprehensive analysis of the most important themes and concepts in this field. Drawing on contemporary research from religious studies, theology, sociology, ethnography, and cultural studies, the volume comprises thirty-one specifically commissioned essays from a team of international experts. The chapters explore the principal areas of inquiry and point to new directions for scholarship. Featuring chapters on methodology, key genres, religious traditions and popular music subcultures, this volume provides the essential reference point for anyone with an interest in religion and popular music as well as popular culture more broadly. Religious traditions covered include Christianity, Islam, Judaism, Hinduism, Buddhism, Paganism and occultism. Coverage of genres and religion ranges from heavy metal, rap and hip hop to country music and film and television music. Edited by Christopher Partridge and Marcus Moberg, this Handbook defines the research field and provides an accessible entry point for new researchers in the field.

Production Consumption of Music

Reflectingon music censorship in apartheid South Africa. InPopular music censorship in Africa, ed. M. Drewett and M. Cloonan,127–136. London: Ashgate. Cloonan, Martin. 2003. Callthat censorship? Problems of definition.In Policing pop ...

Author: Alan Bradshaw

Publisher: Routledge

ISBN: 9781317982661

Category: Social Science

Page: 128

View: 727

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This collection considers music within the spheres of production and consumption and pulls together an interdisciplinary collection of music studies from around the world, ranging from an ethnomusicological analysis of the condition of Tibetan music and its role within the Chinese state, the changing reception of anti-apartheid music by white musicians in South Africa according to new configurations of society and its memory of recent history, a lyrical exploration of jazz as a signifier of crime and other nefarious activities within film history, an analysis of how music charts and maps the social network and gender roles in Jamaica and a landmark commentary on how music is framed by David Hemsondalgh. As opposed to other studies which explore music just in terms of its reception or its composition and distribution, this collection should make necessary reading for anybody interested in the wider nexus of music’s existence and how it waxes and wanes with ideology, politics, gender, business and much more besides.