Playwriting 101

HowExpert Presents Playwriting 101 A Quick Guide on Writing and Producing Your First Play Step by Step From A to Z HowExpert with Marsh Cassady Copyright ...

Author: HowExpert

Publisher: HowExpert

ISBN: 9781647587291

Category: Performing Arts

Page: 108

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To write for the theatre you need to know about theatre. Ideas are easy to come by. Examine your background, interest, and beliefs. Examine the world around you. Exercises can help you come up with ideas. Choose the audience you want to reach and write to that audience. To learn to write dialogue listen to and record everyday conversations. Dialogue should sound like ordinary conversations but has more direction. Know as much as you can about your central characters. Do a character analysis. Choose the character traits to emphasize. A character should come across as both typical and individual. Most plays have a plot, which involves conflict between the protagonist and the antagonist. The parts of a plot are: inciting incident, rising action, turning point, climax, and falling action. Other types of organization for a play are circular and thematic. Before starting to write, you need to develop a central idea. Plays exist for a number of reasons—entertainment, to bring attention to something, and to teach. You need to decide what you want to accomplish. It’s easier to gain an audience’s interest if you start with a theme they agree with. A play needs a sense of universality. A play should be unified, but it also needs contrast. Since theatre is a collaborative art, the director, actor, and designers may see the different facets differently than you do. It’s not difficult to have a well-written produced. Possible markets are schools, organizations, and professional theatre. Finished plays have to follow a particular format. About the Expert Marsh Cassady has had thirty-eight plays published and/or produced—including Off-Broadway. A former theatre professor with a Ph.D. degree, he started a playwriting program at Montclair State in New Jersey that included beginning and advanced classes, workshops, and individual projects. He also taught creative writing, including playwriting, at UCSD. Marsh is the author of sixty published books in a variety of genres from theatre textbooks to novels to true crime, and hundreds of shorter pieces. For about thirty-five years he led all-genre writing workshops in San Diego and in Rosarito, BC, Mexico, where he has lived since 1997. HowExpert publishes quick 'how to' guides on all topics from A to Z by everyday experts.

Playwriting 101 A Quick Guide on Writing and Producing Your First Play Step by Step From A to Z

What's the big idea? -- He said; she said -- What a character! -- Stages, genres, and styles, oh my! -- You're plotting what? -- The best laid schemes of mice and men -- To market, to market to sell a great play.

Author: HowExpert

Publisher: Howexpert

ISBN: 1950864804

Category: Performing Arts

Page: 108

View: 909

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To write for the theatre you need to know about theatre. Ideas are easy to come by. Examine your background, interest, and beliefs. Examine the world around you. Exercises can help you come up with ideas. Choose the audience you want to reach and write to that audience. To learn to write dialogue listen to and record everyday conversations. Dialogue should sound like ordinary conversations but has more direction. Know as much as you can about your central characters. Do a character analysis. Choose the character traits to emphasize. A character should come across as both typical and individual. Most plays have a plot, which involves conflict between the protagonist and the antagonist. The parts of a plot are: inciting incident, rising action, turning point, climax, and falling action. Other types of organization for a play are circular and thematic. Before starting to write, you need to develop a central idea. Plays exist for a number of reasons--entertainment, to bring attention to something, and to teach. You need to decide what you want to accomplish. It's easier to gain an audience's interest if you start with a theme they agree with. A play needs a sense of universality. A play should be unified, but it also needs contrast. Since theatre is a collaborative art, the director, actor, and designers may see the different facets differently than you do. It's not difficult to have a well-written produced. Possible markets are schools, organizations, and professional theatre. Finished plays have to follow a particular format. About the Expert Marsh Cassady has had thirty-eight plays published and/or produced--including Off-Broadway. A former theatre professor with a Ph.D. degree, he started a playwriting program at Montclair State in New Jersey that included beginning and advanced classes, workshops, and individual projects. He also taught creative writing, including playwriting, at UCSD. Marsh is the author of sixty published books in a variety of genres from theatre textbooks to novels to true crime, and hundreds of shorter pieces. For about thirty-five years he led all-genre writing workshops in San Diego and in Rosarito, BC, Mexico, where he has lived since 1997. HowExpert publishes quick 'how to' guides on all topics from A to Z by everyday experts.

The Art and Craft of Playwriting

Working on this book has proved to be a kind of refresher course in Playwriting 101. While I was reading plays, researching other texts, talking to writers ...

Author: Jeffery Hatcher

Publisher: Penguin

ISBN: 9781599634432

Category: Performing Arts

Page: 288

View: 107

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Jeffrey Hatcher knows the nuts and bolts of writing for the theater. Here, he shares his views on it all--from building tension and plotting a scene, right down to moving a character from one side of the stage to the other. From crafting an intriguing beginning to delivering a satisfying ending. In Hatcher's one-on-one discussions with acclaimed American playwrights Lee Blessing, Marsha Norman and Jose Rivera, you'll find a wealth of practical advice, tricks of the trade and insight that will help you in your own creative efforts.

Playwriting

theatre spaces 101–10 acoustics 101 amphitheatres 23, 103 atmosphere 101 backstage/offstage areas 101–2 balconies 101 box office 108 and cast size 102 ...

Author: Fraser Grace

Publisher: Bloomsbury Publishing

ISBN: 9781472526670

Category: Language Arts & Disciplines

Page: 288

View: 686

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Full of inspiration and practical advice, Playwriting: A Writers' & Artists' Companion is a comprehensive companion to writing for the stage. PART 1 includes reflections on the art and the craft of playwriting, guidance on writing for a full range of genres and spaces and a brief history of playwriting itself. PART 2 contains inspiring advice and reflections from leading playwrights:April De Angelis, Bryony Lavery, David Greig, Christina Reid, Dennis Kelly, Frank McGuinness, Lynn Nottage, Howard Brenton, Roy Williams, Tanika Gupta, Timberlake Wertenbaker, Polly Stenham, Tom Stoppard, Jack Thorne, Steve Waters, E.V. Crowe, David Henry Hwang, Lin Coghlan, Zinnie Harris and Anne Washburn. PART 3 offers practical exercises and advice on planning and conducting research, working out plots and characters, mastering authentic but accessible dialogue, navigating the industry and the rehearsal and production process.

88 Money Making Writing Jobs

The Elements of Playwriting by Louis Catron (Waveland Pr Inc, 2001). Writing Your First Play by Roger ... Playwriting 101 Online: www.playwriting101.com.

Author: Robert Bly

Publisher: Sourcebooks, Inc.

ISBN: 9781402223013

Category: Reference

Page: 336

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THE BEST WAYS TO MAKE THOUSANDS OF DOLLARS WRITING! Writers today are no longer just working on books and newspapers. Businesses, advertisers, and hundreds of other outlets are desperate for people who can craft effective messages and persuade people with their words. A strong writer can make $50 to $200 per hour, or even more... if you know where to find the work. Robert Bly is a professional writer who makes more than $600,000 per year from his writing. Now, he's ready to share his secrets. 88 Money-Making Writing Jobs presents the best outlets writers can find to turn their words into profit (including many that few people think to seek out). Along with an overview of each job, you'll discover: A breakdown of what it typically pays The nuts and bolts of what you'll write What it takes to work in the field How to get started Resources for finding the work For anyone serious about a career as a writer, this guide offers the best information on how to make incredible money in ways that are fun, challenging, and make the most of your writing talents.

The Oxford Handbook of the British Musical

Rebellato, 'Playwriting', 101. 9. Helena de Bertodano, 'Can't Dance, Can't Sing, Can Do', Sunday Telegraph, 16 July 2000, 3. 10.

Author: Robert Gordon

Publisher: Oxford University Press

ISBN: 9780199988761

Category: Music

Page: 624

View: 827

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The Oxford Handbook of the British Musical provides a comprehensive academic survey of British musical theatre offering both a historical account of the musical's development from 1728 and a range of in-depth critical analyses of the unique forms and features of British musicals, which explore the aesthetic values and sociocultural meanings of a tradition that initially gave rise to the American musical and later challenged its modern pre-eminence. After a consideration of how John Gay's The Beggar's Opera (1728) created a prototype for eighteenth-century ballad opera, the book focuses on the use of song in early nineteenth century theatre, followed by a sociocultural analysis of the comic operas of Gilbert and Sullivan; it then examines Edwardian and interwar musical comedies and revues as well as the impact of Rodgers and Hammerstein on the West End, before analysing the new forms of the postwar British musical from The Boy Friend (1953) to Oliver! (1960). One section of the book examines the contributions of key twentieth century figures including Noel Coward, Ivor Novello, Tim Rice, Andrew Lloyd Webber, director Joan Littlewood and producer Cameron Macintosh, while a number of essays discuss both mainstream and alternative musicals of the 1960s and 1970s and the influence of the pop industry on the creation of concept recordings such as Jesus Christ Superstar (1970) and Les Misérables (1980). There is a consideration of "jukebox" musicals such as Mamma Mia! (1999), while essays on overtly political shows such as Billy Elliot (2005) are complemented by those on experimental musicals like Jerry Springer: the Opera (2003) and London Road (2011) and on the burgeoning of Black and Asian British musicals in both the West End and subsidized venues. The Oxford Handbook of the British Musical demonstrates not only the unique qualities of British musical theatre but also the vitality and variety of British musicals today.

New Playwriting at Shakespeare s Globe

... 104, 105–6 The Golden Ass 65, 93 audience address 107, 109, 113 audience's role 120, 134–6 characters 101 eroticism 102–3 language and verse 45, ...

Author: Vera Cantoni

Publisher: Bloomsbury Publishing

ISBN: 9781474298261

Category: Performing Arts

Page: 256

View: 185

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Shakespeare's Globe Theatre is recognised worldwide as both a monument to and significant producer of the dramatic art of Shakespeare and his contemporaries. But it has established a reputation too for commissioning innovative and distinctive new plays that respond to the unique characteristics and identity of the theatre. This is the first book to focus on the new drama commissioned and produced at the Globe, to analyse how the specific qualities of the venue have shaped those works and to assess the influences of both past and present in the work staged. The author argues that far from being simply a monument to the past, the reconstructed theatre fosters creativity in the present, creativity that must respond to the theatre's characteristic architecture, the complex set of cultural references it carries and the heterogeneous audience it attracts. Just like the reconstructed 'wooden O', the Globe's new plays highlight the relevance of the past for the present and give the spectators a prominent position. In examining the score of new plays it has produced since 1995 the author considers how they illuminate issues of staging, space, spectators, identity and history - issues that are key to an understanding of much contemporary theatre. Howard Brenton's In Extremis and Anne Boleyn receive detailed consideration, as examples of richly productive connection between the playwright's creativity and the theatre's potential. For readers interested in new writing for the stage and in the work of one of London's totemic theatre spaces, New Playwriting at Shakespeare's Globe offers a fascinating study of the fruitful influences of both past and present in today's theatre.

Women and Playwriting in Nineteenth Century Britain

... 220 playwrighting ( relationship to playwriting ) 7 , 101-102 , 108-109 , 119-21 ; a revised definition of 121 ( see also " wrighting " ) O'Connell ...

Author: Tracy C. Davis

Publisher: Cambridge University Press

ISBN: 0521659825

Category: Drama

Page: 295

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This collection of essays recovers the names and careers of nineteenth-century women playwrights.

Dramatists Sourcebook 26th Edition

... 133 1 Hodder Fellowship, 165 1 Julie Harris Playwriting Awards, ... Kennedy Smith Playwriting Award, 100 1 John Cauble Short Play Awards Program, 101 1 ...

Author:

Publisher: Theatre Communications Group

ISBN: 9781559366748

Category: Performing Arts

Page: 360

View: 963

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"A treasure trove of sound advice and practical information for the working writer."—Donald Margulies, Pulitzer Prize–winning playwright Called "the essential guide to professional opportunities and playscript procedures" by the Dramatist Guild of America, the Dramatists Sourcebook contains more than eight hundred opportunities for playwrights, translators, composers, lyricists, and librettists, including script-submission procedures for more than three hundred professional theaters; more than one hundred prizes; and scores of publishers, fellowships, residencies, agents, and reference publications. This fully revised edition is thoroughly indexed and contains a calendar of submission guidelines and Tony Kushner's "Simple Working Guide for Playwrights."

Modern British Playwriting The 1980s

... 195, 257 Beside Herself 25 1 Broken 'Wings 252 Byrthrite 23 5 career 100—2 Cross my Heart and Hope to Fly 229 The Devil is Gateway 83, 101, 179—86, 228, ...

Author: Jane Milling

Publisher: A&C Black

ISBN: 9781408129609

Category: Literary Criticism

Page: 352

View: 306

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Modern British Playwriting: The 1980s equips readers with a fresh assessment of the theatre and principle playwrights and plays from a decade when political and economic forces were changing society dramatically. It offers a broad survey of the context and of the playwrights and companies such as Complicité and DV8 that rose to prominence at this time. Alongside this it provides a detailed examination based on fresh research of four of the most significant playwrights of the era and considers the influence they had on later work. The 1980s volume features a detailed study by four scholars of the work of four of the major playwrights who came to prominence: Howard Barker (by Sarah Goldingay), Jim Cartwright (David Lane), Sarah Daniels (Jane Milling) and Timberlake Wertenbaker (Sara Freeman). Essential for students of Theatre Studies, the series of six decadal volumes provides a critical survey and study of the theatre produced from the 1950s to 2009. Each volume features a critical analysis of the work of four key playwrights besides other theatre work from that decade, together with an extensive commentary on the period. Readers will understand the works in their contexts and be presented with fresh research material and a reassessment from the perspective of the twenty-first century. This is an authoritative and stimulating reassessment of British playwriting in the 1980s.

Columbia University Bulletin of Information

G.S. Playwriting R101 – Fundamental course . ... G.S. Playwriting 101 repeated in the Spring Session . G.S. Playwriting 102 — Intermediate course .

Author: Columbia University

Publisher:

ISBN: WISC:89093678282

Category:

Page:

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The Elements of Playwriting

... 197—198, 202, 207 Playwriting (Catron), 4—5 Plaza Suite (Simon), ... see Complications Plot writing techniques, 94— 121; beginning, 101—104 ...

Author: Louis E. Catron

Publisher: Waveland Press

ISBN: 9781478608264

Category: Performing Arts

Page: 220

View: 371

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Being a playwright means more than just putting pen to paperit means expressing a personal point of view, bringing a vision to life, developing dimensional characters, structuring a plays action, creating effective characters, creating effective dialogue, and finding producers, directors, and actors to bring a work to life. Catron, a respected writer, producer, director, and instructor, explores these themes and more, presenting the basic principles necessary for writing a stageworthy play. By emphasizing stageworthiness, he shows how to avoid common pitfalls, such as treating a play as literature or being overinfluenced by cinematic writing. Examples from classical and modern plays are included throughout, as are exercises for sharpening and developing skills and practical guidelines on working with actors and directors, getting produced and published, and finding an agent.

Playwriting Playgoers in Shakespeare s Theater

... by amateur playwrights, 74–102, 186; by Barnes, 2, 101, 168–69, 216 n.105, 217 n.110; by Clavell, 117–18; by copyists, 58; currente calamo, 75, 76, 79, ...

Author: Matteo A. Pangallo

Publisher: University of Pennsylvania Press

ISBN: 9780812294255

Category: Literary Criticism

Page: 256

View: 666

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Among the dramatists who wrote for the professional playhouses of early modern London was a small group of writers who were neither members of the commercial theater industry writing to make a living nor aristocratic amateurs dipping their toes in theatrical waters for social or political prestige. Instead, they were largely working- and middle-class amateurs who had learned most of what they knew about drama from being members of the audience. Using a range of familiar and lesser-known print and manuscript plays, as well as literary accounts and documentary evidence, Playwriting Playgoers in Shakespeare's Theater shows how these playgoers wrote and revised to address what they assumed to be the needs of actors, readers, and the Master of the Revels; how they understood playhouse materials and practices; and how they crafted poetry for theatrical effects. The book also situates them in the context of the period's concepts of, and attitudes toward, playgoers' participation in the activity of playmaking. Plays by playgoers such as the rogue East India Company clerk Walter Mountfort or the highwayman John Clavell invite us into the creative imaginations of spectators, revealing what certain audience members wanted to see and how they thought actors might stage it. By reading Shakespeare's theater through these playgoers' works, Matteo Pangallo contributes a new category of evidence to our understanding of the relationships between the early modern stage, its plays, and its audiences. More broadly, he shows how the rise of England's first commercialized culture industry also gave rise to the first generation of participatory consumers and their attempts to engage with mainstream culture by writing early modern "fan fiction."

Building Your Play

Think of it as Playwriting 101. ... it's very useful to step back, remind yourself of the basics, and see where you've made some elementary mistakes.

Author: David Rush

Publisher: SIU Press

ISBN: 9780809385829

Category: Performing Arts

Page: 192

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David Rush takes beginning playwrights through the first draft of a play and deep into the revision process. Drawing on examples from such classics as Othello and The Glass Menagerie, Rush provides detailed models for writers to evaluate their work for weaknesses and focus on the in-depth development of their plays. Rush encourages writers to make sure their plays are clear and focused. He shows how to keep plays dramatically compelling and offers ways to avoid common mistakes that make them dull, confusing, or ineffective. He then distills the essence of traditional revision into key questions and discusses frequently overlooked tools, terms, and strategies that go beyond established methods of evaluation.

Modern American Drama Playwriting in the 1950s

... 56,61, 65, 102, 104–5, 114–18, 122–5, 151 Come Back, Little Sheba 50, 101, 104–10, 123–5 Complex (TV series) 214 Dark at the Top of the Stairs, The 50, ...

Author: Susan C. W. Abbotson

Publisher: Bloomsbury Publishing

ISBN: 9781350014626

Category: Literary Criticism

Page: 328

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The Decades of Modern American Drama series provides a comprehensive survey and study of the theatre produced in each decade from the 1930s to 2009 in eight volumes. Each volume equips readers with a detailed understanding of the context from which work emerged: an introduction considers life in the decade with a focus on domestic life and conditions, social changes, culture, media, technology, industry and political events; while a chapter on the theatre of the decade offers a wide-ranging and thorough survey of theatres, companies, dramatists, new movements and developments in response to the economic and political conditions of the day. The work of the four most prominent playwrights from the decade receives in-depth analysis and re-evaluation by a team of experts, together with commentary on their subsequent work and legacy. A final section brings together original documents such as interviews with the playwrights and with directors, drafts of play scenes, and other previously unpublished material. The major writers and their works to receive in-depth coverage in this volume include: * William Inge: Picnic (1953), Bus Stop (1955) and The Dark at the Top of the Stairs (1957); * Stephen Sondheim, Arthur Laurents and Jerome Robbins: West Side Story (1957) and Gypsy (1959); * Alice Childress: Just a Little Simple (1950), Gold Through the Trees (1952) and Trouble in Mind (1955); * Jerome Lawrence and Robert Lee: Inherit the Wind (1955), Auntie Mame (1956) and The Gang's All Here (1959).

Modern American Drama Playwriting in the 1940s

... 38, 70, 75, 77, 87–92, 97, 101–24, 152, 155, 172, 178, 201–2, 207, 208, 210, 211–14, 225, 226, 237–8 Ah! Wilderness 92 All God's Chillun Got Wings 70, ...

Author: Felicia Hardison Londré

Publisher: Bloomsbury Publishing

ISBN: 9781350017481

Category: Literary Criticism

Page: 328

View: 442

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The Decades of Modern American Drama series provides a comprehensive survey and study of the theatre produced in each decade from the 1930s to 2009 in eight volumes. Each volume equips readers with a detailed understanding of the context from which work emerged: an introduction considers life in the decade with a focus on domestic life and conditions, social changes, culture, media, technology, industry and political events; while a chapter on the theatre of the decade offers a wide-ranging and thorough survey of theatres, companies, dramatists, new movements and developments in response to the economic and political conditions of the day. The work of the four most prominent playwrights from the decade receives in-depth analysis and re-evaluation by a team of experts, together with commentary on their subsequent work and legacy. A final section brings together original documents such as interviews with the playwrights and with directors, drafts of play scenes, and other previously unpublished material. The major playwrights and their works to receive in-depth coverage in this volume include: * Eugene O'Neill: The Iceman Cometh (1946), A Moon for the Misbegotten (1947), Long Day's Journey Into Night (written 1941, produced 1956), and A Touch of the Poet (written 1942, produced 1958); * Tennessee Williams: The Glass Menagerie (1944), A Streetcar Named Desire (1947), Summer and Smoke (1948); * Arthur Miller: All My Sons (1947), Death of a Salesman (1949), and The Crucible (1953); * Thornton Wilder: Our Town (1938), The Skin of Our Teeth (1942), Shadow of a Doubt (1943), and The Alcestiad (written 1940s).

Collaborative Playwriting

... New Playwriting Strategies (NPS) 2–3, 29 Nordic 8, 16, 25–29, 31, 33–36,90; group 3, 5–6, 16, 23m2, 29, 31, 33 North Sea 15, 33, 36 Orbán, V. 9, 101n 5, ...

Author: Paul C Castagno

Publisher: Routledge

ISBN: 9781000709551

Category: Performing Arts

Page: 384

View: 341

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In Collaborative Playwriting, five collectively written plays apply polyvocal methods in which clash and frisson replace synthesis, a dialogic approach to collective writing that has never before been articulated or documented. Based on the EU Collective Plays Project, this collection of plays showcases each voice in dialogic tension and in relation to the other voices of the text, offering an entirely novel approach to new play development that challenges the single (and privileged) authorial voice. Castagno’s case-study approach provides detailed commentary on each of the various experimental methods, exploring the plays’ processes in detail. The book offers an evolutionary path forward in how to develop new work, thus encouraging and promoting the writing of collective, hybrid plays as having profound benefits for all playwrights. The ground breaking approaches to playmaking in Collaborative Playwriting will appeal to playwriting programs, instructors, academics, professional playwrights, theaters and new play development programs; as well as courses in gender LGBTQ studies, script analysis, dramaturgy and dramatic literature across the theater studies curricula.

This Man s Pill

... which any instructor in Playwriting 101 would consider grounds for dropping the student from the class. Yet Derek Jacobi, in the role of Alan Turing, ...

Author: Carl Djerassi

Publisher: Oxford University Press, USA

ISBN: 9780198606956

Category: Biography & Autobiography

Page: 308

View: 610

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Carl Djerassi was responsible for the chemical synthesis of the first steroid oral contraceptive: he is widely referred to as the 'father of the Pill'. In This Man's Pill, Djerassi reflects on the impact the invention of the oral contraceptive pill has had on the world, and on Djerassi himself.

Good Riddance

He had told me — which I'd quickly forgotten since it had the ring of Playwriting 101 and the work of every third Starbucks customer with an open laptop.

Author: Elinor Lipman

Publisher: Eye & Lightning Books

ISBN: 9781785631696

Category: Fiction

Page: 304

View: 361

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'A vastly entertaining screwball comedy’ WASHINGTON POST Decluttering her tiny New York apartment, Daphne Maritch decides to throw out any belongings that do not spark joy. These include a high-school yearbook inherited from her school teacher mother, June, to whom the class of ’68 dedicated the volume. June in turn attended every class reunion, scribbling notes and observations – not always charitably – after each one. When neighbour Geneva Wisenkorn finds the discarded book and wants to use it for her own ends, Daphne realises she wants to keep it after all. Fighting to reclaim it, she uncovers some alarming Maritch family secrets and sets in motion a series of events that prove to be both poignant and absurd. Good Riddance is a vastly entertaining screwball comedy from the Jane Austen of modern New York. 'A caper novel, light as a feather and effortlessly charming. It inspires a very specific kind of modern joy.’ NEW YORK TIMES ‘I’ve been a huge fan of her novels for so many years. Her writing is witty, astute and deliciously dry.’ JILL MANSELL ‘An exceptionally intelligent, wholly original and Austen-like stylist.’ FAY WELDON