Our Bodies Whose Property

Anne Phillips explores the risks associated with metaphors of property and the reasons why the commodification of the body remains problematic. What, she asks, is wrong with thinking of oneself as the owner of one's body?

Author: Anne Phillips

Publisher: Princeton University Press

ISBN: 9781400846368

Category: Philosophy

Page: 216

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An argument against treating our bodies as commodities No one wants to be treated like an object, regarded as an item of property, or put up for sale. Yet many people frame personal autonomy in terms of self-ownership, representing themselves as property owners with the right to do as they wish with their bodies. Others do not use the language of property, but are similarly insistent on the rights of free individuals to decide for themselves whether to engage in commercial transactions for sex, reproduction, or organ sales. Drawing on analyses of rape, surrogacy, and markets in human organs, Our Bodies, Whose Property? challenges notions of freedom based on ownership of our bodies and argues against the normalization of markets in bodily services and parts. Anne Phillips explores the risks associated with metaphors of property and the reasons why the commodification of the body remains problematic. What, she asks, is wrong with thinking of oneself as the owner of one's body? What is wrong with making our bodies available for rent or sale? What, if anything, is the difference between markets in sex, reproduction, or human body parts, and the other markets we commonly applaud? Phillips contends that body markets occupy the outer edges of a continuum that is, in some way, a feature of all labor markets. But she also emphasizes that we all have bodies, and considers the implications of this otherwise banal fact for equality. Bodies remind us of shared vulnerability, alerting us to the common experience of living as embodied beings in the same world. Examining the complex issue of body exceptionalism, Our Bodies, Whose Property? demonstrates that treating the body as property makes human equality harder to comprehend.

Our Bodies Whose Property

Yet many people frame personal autonomy in terms of self-ownership, representing themselves as property owners with the right to do as they wish with their bodies. Others do not use the language of property, but are similarly insistent ...

Author: Anne Phillips

Publisher: Princeton University Press

ISBN: 9780691150864

Category: Philosophy

Page: 216

View: 402

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No one wants to be treated like an object, regarded as an item of property, or put up for sale. Yet many people frame personal autonomy in terms of self-ownership, representing themselves as property owners with the right to do as they wish with their bodies. Others do not use the language of property, but are similarly insistent on the rights of free individuals to decide for themselves whether to engage in commercial transactions for sex, reproduction, or organ sales. Drawing on analyses of rape, surrogacy, and markets in human organs, Our Bodies, Whose Property? challenges notions of freedom based on ownership of our bodies and argues against the normalization of markets in bodily services and parts. Anne Phillips explores the risks associated with metaphors of property and the reasons why the commodification of the body remains problematic. What, she asks, is wrong with thinking of oneself as the owner of one's body? What is wrong with making our bodies available for rent or sale? What, if anything, is the difference between markets in sex, reproduction, or human body parts, and the other markets we commonly applaud? Phillips contends that body markets occupy the outer edges of a continuum that is, in some way, a feature of all labor markets. But she also emphasizes that we all have bodies, and considers the implications of this otherwise banal fact for equality. Bodies remind us of shared vulnerability, alerting us to the common experience of living as embodied beings in the same world. Examining the complex issue of body exceptionalism, Our Bodies, Whose Property? demonstrates that treating the body as property makes human equality harder to comprehend.

Unconditional Equals

At a time when the supposedly shared belief in human equality is so patently not shared, the book makes a powerful case for seeing equality as a commitment we make to ourselves and others, and a claim we make on others when they deny us our ...

Author: Anne Phillips

Publisher: Princeton University Press

ISBN: 9780691226170

Category: Philosophy

Page: 152

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Why equality cannot be conditional on a shared human “nature” but has to be for all For centuries, ringing declarations about all men being created equal appealed to a shared human nature as the reason to consider ourselves equals. But appeals to natural equality invited gradations of natural difference, and the ambiguity at the heart of “nature” enabled generations to write of people as equal by nature while barely noticing the exclusion of those marked as inferior by their gender, race, or class. Despite what we commonly tell ourselves, these exclusions and gradations continue today. In Unconditional Equals, political philosopher Anne Phillips challenges attempts to justify equality by reference to a shared human nature, arguing that justification turns into conditions and ends up as exclusion. Rejecting the logic of justification, she calls instead for a genuinely unconditional equality. Drawing on political, feminist, and postcolonial theory, Unconditional Equals argues that we should understand equality not as something grounded in shared characteristics but as something people enact when they refuse to be considered inferiors. At a time when the supposedly shared belief in human equality is so patently not shared, the book makes a powerful case for seeing equality as a commitment we make to ourselves and others, and a claim we make on others when they deny us our status as equals.

Just Property

PHILLIPS: OUR BODIES, WHOSE PROPERTY? In her own extended essay Our Bodies, Whose Property?, Anne Phillips (2013) stakes out what appears to be a more straightforwardly anti-contractual line. She addresses two by now familiar questions: ...

Author: Christopher Pierson

Publisher: Oxford University Press

ISBN: 9780191090806

Category: Political Science

Page: 368

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This third and concluding volume of Just Property brings critical accounts of property right up to the present. The book is made up of five pairs of chapters located in five major ideological traditions of modernity: liberalism, libertarianism, social democracy, conservatism, and feminism. As before, the focus is on particular thinkers and their daring, puzzling and sometimes outrageous views. The concluding chapter returns to the project's opening questions about property and inequality and about property under the imperative of growth to limits. If we are to confront the enormous challenges that loom in front of us, we have, above all else, to think again, and quite radically, about the place of property in our collective lives.

The Politics of the Human

In doing so, she engages with a range of contemporary debates on human dignity, humanism, and post-humanism, and argues that none of these is necessary to a strong politics of the human.

Author: Anne Phillips

Publisher: Cambridge University Press

ISBN: 9781316241141

Category: Political Science

Page:

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The human is a central reference point for human rights. But who or what is that human? And given its long history of exclusiveness, when so many of those now recognised as human were denied the name, how much confidence can we attach to the term? This book works towards a sense of the human that does without substantive accounts of 'humanity' while also avoiding their opposite – the contentless versions that deny important differences such as race, gender and sexuality. Drawing inspiration from Hannah Arendt's anti-foundationalism, Phillips rejects the idea of 'humanness' as grounded in essential characteristics we can be shown to share. She stresses instead the human as claim and commitment, as enactment and politics of equality. In doing so, she engages with a range of contemporary debates on human dignity, humanism, and post-humanism, and argues that none of these is necessary to a strong politics of the human.

Catholic Moral Philosophy in Practice Theory

Phillips, Our Bodies, Whose Property? 14, see also 19. 82. See, for a much closer discussion, my paper “When Words Fail Us: Reexamining the Conscience of Huckleberry Finn,” Journal of Aesthetic Education 45 (2011): 1–22. 83.

Author: Bernard G. Prusak

Publisher: Paulist Press

ISBN: 9781587685910

Category:

Page:

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The Political Imaginary of Sexual Freedom

Phillips offers a compelling critique of the conceptualization of bodies as commodified property in her book, Our Bodies, Whose Property? In this book, the author elaborates a thorough analysis of the problematic and paradoxical ...

Author: Leticia Sabsay

Publisher: Springer

ISBN: 9781137263872

Category: Psychology

Page: 282

View: 169

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This book develops a performative and relational approach to gendered and sexualised bodies conceived as distinct from the more limited individualistic idea of sexual identity and orientation that is at play within notions of progress in contemporary transnational sexual politics. Focusing on the psychosocial dimension of sexual life, Sabsay challenges accepted ideas of increased emancipation, and the steady extension of rights, offering instead a critique of the liberal imaginary that is at the base of the sexual rights-bearing subject. The book offers a notion of sexual embodiment that provides an alternative to individualism, one that is social, radically relational and psychically divided, and that implies a different conception of democratic sexual politics for our time.This book brings together political and cultural analysis of sexual rights discourse with a strong theory of the relational subject whose political investments and articulations depend on a political imaginary. This is a highly original and methodical text which will be of particular interest to academics and scholars of gender and sexuality studies, sociology, politics and psychology.

Babies for Sale

In Our Bodies, Whose Property? Anne Phillips (2013) asks, 'What's so special about the body?' She writes (p. 19): While no one wants to be regarded as an object, many like to think of themselves as 'self-owners', like to see themselves, ...

Author: Miranda Davies

Publisher: Zed Books Ltd.

ISBN: 9781783607044

Category: Social Science

Page: 416

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Transnational surrogacy – the creation of babies across borders – has become big business. Globalization, reproductive technologies, new family formations and rising infertility are combining to produce a 'quiet revolution' in social and medical ethics and the nature of parenthood. Whereas much of the current scholarship has focused on the US and India, this groundbreaking anthology offers a far wider perspective. Featuring contributions from over thirty activists and scholars from a range of countries and disciplines, this collection offers the first genuinely international study of transnational surrogacy. Its innovative bottom-up approach, rooted in feminist perspectives, gives due prominence to the voices of those most affected by the global surrogacy chain, namely the surrogate mothers, donors, prospective parents and the children themselves. Through case studies ranging from Israel to Mexico, the book outlines the forces that are driving the growth of transnational surrogacy, as well as its implications for feminism, human rights, motherhood and masculinity.

Property Liberty and Self Ownership in Seventeenth Century England

17 Skinner, “On Trusting the Judgement of Our Rulers. ... the dominant “Lockean” version – for feminist theory, see Petchesky, “Body as Property”; Shanks, “Rhetoric of Self-Ownership. ... 37 Phillips, Our Bodies, Whose Property?, 143.

Author: Lorenzo Sabbadini

Publisher: McGill-Queen's Press - MQUP

ISBN: 9780228003045

Category: History

Page:

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The concept of self-ownership was first articulated in anglophone political thought in the decades between the outbreak of the English Civil War and the Glorious Revolution. This book traces the emergence and evolution of self-ownership over the course of this period, culminating in a reinterpretation of John Locke's celebrated but widely misunderstood idea that "every Man has a Property in his own Person." Often viewed through the prism of libertarian political thought, self-ownership has its roots in the neo-Roman or republican concept of liberty as freedom from dependence on the will of another. As Lorenzo Sabbadini reveals, seventeenth-century writers believed that the attainment of this status required not only a specific kind of constitution but a particular distribution of property as well. Many regarded the protection of private property as constitutive of liberty, and it is in this context that the vocabulary of self-ownership emerged. Others expressed anxieties about the corrupting effects of excessive concentrations of wealth or even the institution of private property itself. Bringing together canonical republican writers such as John Milton and James Harrington, lesser-known pamphleteers, and Locke, a theorist generally regarded as being at odds with neo-Roman thought, Property, Liberty, and Self-Ownership in Seventeenth-Century England is a bold, innovative study of some of the most influential concepts to emerge from this groundbreaking period of British history.

Body Self Other

A. Phillips, Our Bodies, Whose Property? (Princeton, NJ: Princeton University Press, 2013), 96. 18. Martin, The Woman in the Body, 57. 19. Martin, The Woman in the Body, 66. 20. See W. Brown, Undoing the Demos: Neoliberalism's Stealth ...

Author: Luna Dolezal

Publisher: SUNY Press

ISBN: 9781438466217

Category: Philosophy

Page: 420

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Examines the lived experience of social encounters drawing on phenomenological insights. Body/Self/Other brings together a variety of phenomenological perspectives to examine the complexity of social encounters across a range of social, political, and ethical issues. It investigates the materiality of social encounters and the habitual attitudes that structure lived experience. In particular, the contributors examine how constructions of race, gender, sexuality, criminality, and medicalized forms of subjectivity affect perception and social interaction. Grounded in practical, everyday experiences, this book provides a theoretical framework that considers the extent to which fundamental ethical obligations arise from the fact of individuals’ intercorporeality and sociality.

Turkey s Necropolitical Laboratory

Not all of these elements are conscious human beings, let alone political agents with willpower. ... Anne Phillips in her timely and interesting book Our Bodies, Whose Property? discusses the risks tied to understanding the female body ...

Author: Bargu Banu Bargu

Publisher: Edinburgh University Press

ISBN: 9781474450294

Category:

Page: 296

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This book makes a strong case that Turkey's regime and its vicissitudes are dependent on a necropolitical undercurrent. Building on the insights of critical and contemporary theory, the essays address the multiple ways in which lives are brought into the fold of power. Once there, they are subjected to mechanisms of death and destruction, and to modalities of infrastructural violence, strategic neglect and exposure. This produces new forms of impoverishment, inequality and disposability. Bringing together historical, discursive, and ethnographic approaches from multiple disciplines, this collection offers a sobering and original analysis of contemporary Turkey.

The Intellectual Properties of Learning

Their Hand before Our Eyes: A Closer Look at Scribes. Lyell Lectures 1999. Farnham, Surrey, UK: Ashgate, 2008. ... “Self-Ownership and Property in the Person: Democratization and a Tale of Two Concepts. ... Our Bodies: Whose Property?

Author: John Willinsky

Publisher: University of Chicago Press

ISBN: 9780226488080

Category: History

Page: 400

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Providing a sweeping millennium-plus history of the learned book in the West, John Willinsky puts current debates over intellectual property into context, asking what it is about learning that helped to create the concept even as it gave the products of knowledge a different legal and economic standing than other sorts of property. Willinsky begins with Saint Jerome in the fifth century, then traces the evolution of reading, writing, and editing practices in monasteries, schools, universities, and among independent scholars through the medieval period and into the Renaissance. He delves into the influx of Islamic learning and the rediscovery of classical texts, the dissolution of the monasteries, and the founding of the Bodleian Library before finally arriving at John Locke, whose influential lobbying helped bring about the first copyright law, the Statute of Anne of 1710. Willinsky’s bravura tour through this history shows that learning gave rise to our idea of intellectual property while remaining distinct from, if not wholly uncompromised by, the commercial economy that this concept inspired, making it clear that today’s push for marketable intellectual property threatens the very nature of the quest for learning on which it rests.

Exploitation

Our Bodies, Whose Property? Princeton: Princeton University Press, 2013. ———. 'It's My Body and I'll Do What I like with It: Bodies as Objects and Property'. Political Theory 39, no. 6 (2011): 724–48. ———. The Politics of the Human.

Author: Monique Deveaux

Publisher: Rowman & Littlefield

ISBN: 9781786602053

Category: Political Science

Page: 288

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First collection to apply a pluralistic and multi-disciplinary approach to understanding exploitation and its potential remedies.

The Contested Moralities of Markets

Our bodies, whose property? Princeton, NJ: Princeton University Press. Portes, A.. (2010). ... Contested commodities: The trouble with trade in sex, children, body parts, and other things. Cambridge, MA: Harvard University Press.

Author: Simone Schiller-Merkens

Publisher: Emerald Group Publishing

ISBN: 9781787691193

Category: Social Science

Page: 232

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Highlighting the sources, processes and outcomes of moral struggles in and around markets, this volume advances our current understanding of markets and their contested moralities.

New Feminist Perspectives on Embodiment

Our Bodies, Whose Property? Princeton: Princeton University Press. Rothman, Barbara Katz. 2010. Laboring Now: Current Cultural Constructions of Pregnancy, Birth and Mothering. In The Body Reader: Essential Social and Cultural Readings, ...

Author: Clara Fischer

Publisher: Springer

ISBN: 9783319723532

Category: Social Science

Page: 252

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Despite several decades of feminist activism and scholarship, women’s bodies continue to be sites of control and contention both materially and symbolically. Issues such as reproductive technologies, sexual violence, objectification, motherhood, and sex trafficking, among others, constitute ongoing, pressing concerns for women’s bodies in our contemporary milieu, arguably exacerbated in a neoliberal world where bodies are instrumentalized as sites of human capital. This book engages with these themes by building on the strong tradition of feminist thought focused on women’s bodies, and by making novel contributions that reflect feminists’ concerns—both theoretically and empirically—about gender and embodiment in the present context and beyond. The collection brings together essays from a variety of feminist scholars who deploy diverse theoretical approaches, including phenomenology, pragmatism, and new materialisms, in order to examine philosophically the question of the current status of gendered bodies through cutting-edge feminist theory.

Vulnerability in Resistance

On the body as the emblematic locus of vulnerability, see, for example, Anne Phillips, Our Bodies, Whose Property? Zerilli, “The Turn to Affect and the Problem of Judgment.” Hemmings, “Invoking Affect.” Cf. Berlant, Cruel Optimism ...

Author: Judith Butler

Publisher: Duke University Press

ISBN: 9780822373490

Category: Social Science

Page: 360

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Vulnerability and resistance have often been seen as opposites, with the assumption that vulnerability requires protection and the strengthening of paternalistic power at the expense of collective resistance. Focusing on political movements and cultural practices in different global locations, including Turkey, Palestine, France, and the former Yugoslavia, the contributors to Vulnerability in Resistance articulate an understanding of the role of vulnerability in practices of resistance. They consider how vulnerability is constructed, invoked, and mobilized within neoliberal discourse, the politics of war, resistance to authoritarian and securitarian power, in LGBTQI struggles, and in the resistance to occupation and colonial violence. The essays offer a feminist account of political agency by exploring occupy movements and street politics, informal groups at checkpoints and barricades, practices of self-defense, hunger strikes, transgressive enactments of solidarity and mourning, infrastructural mobilizations, and aesthetic and erotic interventions into public space that mobilize memory and expose forms of power. Pointing to possible strategies for a feminist politics of transversal engagements and suggesting a politics of bodily resistance that does not disavow forms of vulnerability, the contributors develop a new conception of embodiment and sociality within fields of contemporary power. Contributors. Meltem Ahiska, Athena Athanasiou, Sarah Bracke, Judith Butler, Elsa Dorlin, Başak Ertür, Zeynep Gambetti, Rema Hammami, Marianne Hirsch, Elena Loizidou, Leticia Sabsay, Nükhet Sirman, Elena Tzelepis

Methods in Analytical Political Theory

Our Bodies, Whose Property? Princeton, NJ: Princeton University Press. Rawls, John, 1999a. A Theory of Justice. Revised edition. Cambridge, MA: Belknap Press. Rawls, John, 1999b. Collected Papers, ed. Samuel Freeman.

Author: Adrian Blau

Publisher: Cambridge University Press

ISBN: 9781108210478

Category: Political Science

Page:

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This is the first book to explain how to use key methods in analytical political theory. The methods discussed include contractualism, reflective equilibrium, positive political theory, thought experiments and ideological analysis. Many discussions of political theory methods describe and justify these methods with little or no discussion of their application, emphasizing 'what is' and 'why do' over 'how to'. This book covers all three. Each chapter explains what kinds of problems in political theory might require researchers to use a particular method, the basic principles behind the method being proposed, and an analysis of how to apply it, including concrete principles of good practice. The book thus summarizes methodological ideas, grouped in one place and made accessible to students, and it makes innovative contributions to research methods in analytical political theory.

Gender Agency and Coercion

Her most recent book, Our Bodies, Whose Property?, will bepublished in2013. Sadie Wearing is LecturerinGender, Mediaand Culture atthe LSE. She haspublishedonissues of postfeminism, ageing,and culture andis currentlyworking on abook ...

Author: S. Madhok

Publisher: Springer

ISBN: 9781137295613

Category: Social Science

Page: 289

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Drawing on recent feminist discussions, this collection critically reassesses ideas about agency, exploring the relationship between agency and coercion in greater depth and across a range of disciplinary perspectives and ethical contexts.

Ethics

My thinking has mingled with Wisdom's and Bambrough's approaches over the years. ... For commodification: Anne Philips, Our Bodies, Whose Property (2013) and Janet Radcliffe Richards, The Ethics of Transplants (2012).

Author: Peter Cave

Publisher: Simon and Schuster

ISBN: 9781780745770

Category: Philosophy

Page: 256

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Should we aim to maximize happiness? Are there characteristics that we should foster within ourselves? Why is it important to act morally? From the ancient Greeks to Sartre, from utilitarianism to the categorical imperative, Ethics: A Beginner’s Guide presents this vital topic of philosophy via its most influential thinkers and theories. With characteristic wit, philosopher Peter Cave steers us around well known and not-so-well known ethical traps – in the private sphere, in community life, and in relation to God and religion. As well as a guide to ongoing theoretical debates, Cave shows how the discipline helps us to confront topical controversies including those of the environment, abortion, and animal welfare. For anyone who questions how we ought to live, there is no better introduction to ethics and how it relates to twenty-first-century society.

Civil Wrongs and Justice in Private Law

Our Bodies, Whose Property?(Princeton, NJ: Princeton University Press). Plaxton, M. (2015). Implied Consent and Sexual Assault (Montreal and Kingston: McGillQueen's University Press). Plunkett, David (2012).

Author: Paul B. Miller

Publisher: Oxford University Press, USA

ISBN: 9780190865269

Category: Law

Page: 552

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"Civil wrongs occupy a significant place in private law. They are particularly prominent in tort law, but equally have a place in contract law, property and intellectual property law, unjust enrichment, fiduciary law, and in equity more broadly. For example, some tort theorists maintain that tort law is best understood as a (or perhaps the) law of civil wrongs and some contract law theorists maintain that breach of contract is a civil wrong. Civil wrongs are also a preoccupation of leading general theories of private law, including corrective justice and civil recourse theories. According to these and other theories, the centrality of civil wrongs to civil liability shows that private law is fundamentally concerned with the expression and enforcement of norms of justice appropriate to interpersonal interaction and association. Others, sounding notes of caution or criticism, argue that a preoccupation with wrongs and remedies has meant neglect of other ways in which private law serves justice, and ways in which private law serves values other than justice. The present volume comprises original papers written by a wide variety of legal theorists and philosophers exploring the nature of civil wrongs, their place in private law, and their relationship to other forms of wrongdoing. It should be of broad interest to lawyers and legal theorists as well as moral and political theorists"--