Minutes of the Annual Conferences of the Methodist Episcopal Church South

About the Publisher Forgotten Books publishes hundreds of thousands of rare and classic books. Find more at www.forgottenbooks.com This book is a reproduction of an important historical work.

Author: Methodist Episcopal Church South

Publisher: Forgotten Books

ISBN: 1391218159

Category:

Page: 140

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Excerpt from Minutes of the Annual Conferences of the Methodist Episcopal Church, South: For the Year 1873 Question 1. Who are admitted on trial? Answer. Gottlieb Meyer, John G. Knight, J. Wesley Steele, James D. Reese, James T. Williams, Wm. T. Caruthers, Alfred Lewis Henley, Vincent W. Wheeler, Hiner, Washington Varner. 11. About the Publisher Forgotten Books publishes hundreds of thousands of rare and classic books. Find more at www.forgottenbooks.com This book is a reproduction of an important historical work. Forgotten Books uses state-of-the-art technology to digitally reconstruct the work, preserving the original format whilst repairing imperfections present in the aged copy. In rare cases, an imperfection in the original, such as a blemish or missing page, may be replicated in our edition. We do, however, repair the vast majority of imperfections successfully; any imperfections that remain are intentionally left to preserve the state of such historical works.

William Taylor and the Mapping of the Methodist Missionary Tradition

1873. New York: Nelson & Phillips, 1873. Minutes of the Annual Conferences of the Methodist Episcopal Church, for the Years 1773–1828. New York: T. Mason and G. Lane, 1840. Minutes of the Annual Conferences of the Methodist Episcopal ...

Author: Douglas D. Tzan

Publisher: Lexington Books

ISBN: 9781498559096

Category: Religion

Page: 280

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This book is the first critical biography of William Taylor, a nineteenth-century American missionary who worked on six continents. Following Taylor’s global odyssey, the volume maps the contours of the Methodist missionary tradition and illumines key historical foundations of contemporary world Christianity. A work of social history that places a leading Methodist missionary in the foreground, this narrative illustrates distinctive aspects and tensions within Methodist missions such as the importance of doctrines like universal atonement and entire sanctification, a deeply pragmatic orientation rooted in God’s providence, an embrace of both entrepreneurial initiatives and networked connection, and the use of revivalism for missionary outreach and leadership development. A Virginia native, Taylor became a Methodist preacher and missionary in California. This volume provides an important narrative account of Taylor’s career as an itinerant revivalist and popular author, in which he toured the eastern United States, the British Isles, and Australasia. Taylor’s participation in the South African revival made him an evangelical celebrity. The author also follows Taylor’s important visits to India and South America, where he initiated new Methodist missions in those contexts and pioneered the concept of “tentmaking” missions. In 1884, Taylor was elected missionary bishop of Africa by his church. By the end of his life, Taylor had recruited or inspired hundreds of Methodists to become foreign missionaries.

Black Judas

Minutes of the Seventh Session of the Georgia Annual Conference of the Methodist Episcopal Church Held at Atlanta, Ga., ... October 29, 1873, 174:4–5; Minutes of the Annual Conferences of the Methodist Episcopal Church for the Year 1873 ...

Author: John David Smith

Publisher: University of Georgia Press

ISBN: 9780820356259

Category: History

Page: 416

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William Hannibal Thomas (1843–1935) served with distinction in the U.S. Colored Troops in the Civil War (in which he lost an arm) and was a preacher, teacher, lawyer, state legislator, and journalist following Appomattox. In many publications up through the 1890s, Thomas espoused a critical though optimistic black nationalist ideology. After his mid-twenties, however, Thomas began exhibiting a self-destructive personality, one that kept him in constant trouble with authorities and always on the run. His book The American Negro (1901) was his final self-destructive act. Attacking African Americans in gross and insulting language in this utterly pessimistic book, Thomas blamed them for the contemporary “Negro problem” and argued that the race required radical redemption based on improved “character,” not changed “color.” Vague in his recommendations, Thomas implied that blacks should model themselves after certain mulattoes, most notably William Hannibal Thomas. Black Judas is a biography of Thomas, a publishing history of The American Negro, and an analysis of that book’s significance to American racial thought. The book is based on fifteen years of research, including research in postamputation trauma and psychoanalytic theory on selfhatred, to assess Thomas’s metamorphosis from a constructive race critic to a black Negrophobe. John David Smith argues that his radical shift resulted from key emotional and physical traumas that mirrored Thomas’s life history of exposure to white racism and intense physical pain.