Let My People Go

Our hope is that this book will be like a lighthouse that can guide young readers through good times and bad....The ideas that these ancient stories hold are not for one people, at one time, in one place.

Author: Patricia C. McKissack

Publisher: Simon and Schuster

ISBN: 9781481418997

Category: Juvenile Fiction

Page: 144

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"Come join me as I take you back to Charleston, South Carolina, to my father's forge in the early 1800's. Sit with me on the woodpile as he tells a tale of faith, hope, or love." In this extraordinary collection, Charlotte Jefferies and her father Price, a former slave, introduce us to twelve best loved Bible tales, from Genesis to Daniel, and reveal their significance in the lives of African Americans--and indeed of all oppressed peoples. When Charlotte wants to understand the cruel injustices of her time, she turns to her father. Does the powerful slaveholder, Mr. Sam Riley, who seems to own all that surrounds them, also own the sun and moon? she wonders. Price's answer is to tell the story of Creation. How can God allow an evil like slavery to exist? she asks. Price responds by telling the story of the Hebrews' Exodus -- and shows Charlotte that someday their people, too, will be free. With exquisite clarity, Patricia and Fredrick McKissack and James Ransome -- a Newbery Honor winner and all Coretta Scott King Award winners -- brilliantly illuminate the parallels between the stories of the Jews and African-American history. Let My People Go is a triumphant celebration of both the human spirit and the enduring power of story as a source of strength. Our hope is that this book will be like a lighthouse that can guide young readers through good times and bad....The ideas that these ancient stories hold are not for one people, at one time, in one place. They are for all of us, for all times, everywhere. --from the Authors' Note to Let My People Go

Let My People Go

The daughter of a free black man who worked as a blacksmith in Charleston, South Carolina, in the early 1800s recalls the stories from the Bible that her father shared with her, relating them to the experiences of African Americans.

Author: Pat McKissack

Publisher: Simon and Schuster

ISBN: 9780689808562

Category: Juvenile Fiction

Page: 134

View: 222

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The daughter of a free black man who worked as a blacksmith in Charleston, South Carolina, in the early 1800s recalls the stories from the Bible that her father shared with her, relating them to the experiences of African Americans.

Black Authors and Illustrators of Books for Children and Young Adults

Stories of Black Women Freedom Fighters, 283 Let My People Go, 302 Let my People Go: Bible Stories Told by a Freeman of Color, 228 Let my People Go: Bible Stories Told by a Freeman of Color., 232 Let's Count, Baby, 119, 172 Let's Play: ...

Author: Barbara Thrash Murphy

Publisher: Routledge

ISBN: 9781135873554

Category: Literary Collections

Page: 524

View: 853

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Black Authors and Illustrators of Books for Children and Young Adults is a biographical dictionary that provides comprehensive coverage of all major authors and illustrators – past and present. As the only reference volume of its kind available, this book is a valuable research tool that provides quick access for anyone studying black children’s literature – whether one is a student, a librarian charged with maintaining a children’s literature collection, or a scholar of children’s literature. The Fourth Edition of this renowned reference work illuminates African American contributions to children’s literature and books for young adults. The new edition contains updated and new information for existing author/illustrator entries, the addition of approximately 50 new profiles, and a new section listing online resources of interest to the authors and readers of black children’s literature.

The Bible in American Life

See, for example, Sunday evenings; or, An easy introduction to the reading of the Bible (New-York: J. & J. Harper, 1832), 27–39; ... Patricia and Fredrick McKissack, Let My People Go: Bible Stories Told by a Freeman of Color, ill.

Author: Peter Johannes Thuesen

Publisher: Oxford University Press

ISBN: 9780190468910

Category: Bible

Page: 520

View: 631

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There is a paradox in American Christianity. According to Gallup, nearly eight in ten Americans regard the Bible as either the literal word of God or the inspired by God. At the same time, surveys have revealed gaps in these same Americans' biblical literacy. These discrepancies reveal the complex relationship between American Christians and Holy Writ, a subject that is widely acknowledged but rarely investigated. The Bible in American Life is a sustained, collaborative reflection on the ways Americans use the Bible in their personal lives. It also considers how other influences, including religious communities and the internet, shape individuals' comprehension of scripture. Employing both quantitative methods (the General Social Survey and the National Congregations Study) and qualitative research (historical studies for context), The Bible in American Life provides an unprecedented perspective on the Bible's role outside of worship, in the lived religion of a broad cross-section of Americans both now and in the past. The Bible has been central to Christian practice, and has functioned as a cultural touchstone, throughout American history, but too little is known about how people engage it every day. How do people read the Bible for themselves outside of worship? How have denominational and parachurch publications influenced the interpretation and application of scripture? How have clergy and congregations influenced individual understandings of scripture? These questions are especially pressing in a time when denominations are losing much of their traditional cultural authority, technology is changing reading and cognitive habits, and subjective experience is continuing to eclipse textual authority as the mark of true religion. From the broadest scale imaginable, national survey data about all Americans, down to the smallest details, such as the portrayal of Noah and his ark in children's Bibles, this book offers insight and illumination from scholars across the intellectual spectrum. It will be useful and informative for scholars seeking to understand changes in American Christianity as well as clergy seeking more effective ways to preach and teach about scripture in a changing environment.

The Oxford Handbook of the Bible in America

Thomas Nelson, 2001); My Holy Bible for African-American Children (Grand Rapids, Mich.: Zondervan, 2009); and Patricia and Fredrick McKissack, Let My People Go: Bible Stories Told by a Freeman of Color, illus.

Author: Paul Gutjahr

Publisher: Oxford University Press

ISBN: 9780190258856

Category: Religion

Page: 640

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Early Americans have long been considered "A People of the Book" Because the nickname was coined primarily to invoke close associations between Americans and the Bible, it is easy to overlook the central fact that it was a book-not a geographic location, a monarch, or even a shared language-that has served as a cornerstone in countless investigations into the formation and fragmentation of early American culture. Few books can lay claim to such powers of civilization-altering influence. Among those which can are sacred books, and for Americans principal among such books stands the Bible. This Handbook is designed to address a noticeable void in resources focused on analyzing the Bible in America in various historical moments and in relationship to specific institutions and cultural expressions. It takes seriously the fact that the Bible is both a physical object that has exercised considerable totemic power, as well as a text with a powerful intellectual design that has inspired everything from national religious and educational practices to a wide spectrum of artistic endeavors to our nation's politics and foreign policy. This Handbook brings together a number of established scholars, as well as younger scholars on the rise, to provide a scholarly overview--rich with bibliographic resources--to those interested in the Bible's role in American cultural formation.

Best Jewish Books for Children and Teens

McKissack, Pat and Fredrick McKissack Let My People Go: Bible Stories Told By a Freeman of Color to His Daughter, Charlotte, in Charleston, South Carolina, 1806–16 Illustrated by James Ransome Atheneum, 1998. 134 PAGES. Ages 9–12.

Author: Silver

Publisher: Jewish Publication Society

ISBN: 9780827611214

Category: Social Science

Page: 375

View: 275

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Linda Silver selected the titles that "represent the best in writing, illustration, reader appeal, and authentically Jewish content--in picture books, fiction and non-fiction, for readers ranging from early childhood through the high school years."--P. [4] of cover.

Children s Bibles in America

A Reception History of the Story of Noah's Ark in US Children's Bibles Russell W. Dalton ... Patricia and Fredrick McKissack, Let My People Go: Bible Stories Told by a Freeman of Color, illus. by James E. Ransome (New York: Atheneum ...

Author: Russell W. Dalton

Publisher: Bloomsbury Publishing

ISBN: 9780567660169

Category: Religion

Page: 304

View: 537

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Children's Bibles have been among the most popular and influential types of religious publications in the United States, providing many Americans with their first formative experiences of the Bible and its stories. In Children's Bibles in America, Russell W. Dalton explores the variety of ways in which children's Bibles have adapted, illustrated, and retold Bible stories for children throughout U.S. history. This reception history of the story of Noah as it appears in children's Bibles provides striking examples of the multivalence and malleability of biblical texts, and offers intriguing snapshots of American culture and American religion in their most basic forms. Dalton demonstrates the ways in which children's Bibles reflect and reveal America's diverse and changing beliefs about God, childhood, morality, and what must be passed on to the next generation. Dalton uses the popular story of Noah's ark as a case study, exploring how it has been adapted and appropriated to serve in a variety of social agendas. Throughout America's history, the image of God in children's Bible adaptations of the story of Noah has ranged from that of a powerful, angry God who might destroy children at any time to that of a friendly God who will always keep children safe. At the same time, Noah has been lifted up as a model of virtues ranging from hard work and humble obedience to patience and positive thinking. Dalton explores these uses of the story of Noah and more as he engages the fields of biblical studies, the history of religion in America, religious education, childhood studies, and children's literature.

The Continuum Encyclopedia of Children s Literature

Let My People Go : BIBLE Stories Told by a Freeman of Color ( 1998 ) , with ILLUSTRATIONS by James RANSOME , is a book the M.s have done together . A former slave tells twelve Hebrew Bible stories to his daughter , revealing their ...

Author: Bernice E. Cullinan

Publisher: A&C Black

ISBN: 0826417787

Category: Literary Criticism

Page: 863

View: 299

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Provides articles covering children's literature from around the world as well as biographical and critical reviews of authors including Avi, C.S. Lewis, J.K. Rowling, and Anno Mitsumasa.

In the Name of Education

But, again, that should not be a reflection on Christ or the Bible, which opposes slavery to its core. 113. ... Patricia and Fredrick McKissack, Let My People Go: Bible Stories Told by a Freeman of Color to Hi s Daughter, Charlotte, ...

Author: Jonas E. Alexis

Publisher: Xulon Press

ISBN: 9781600347603

Category: Poetry

Page: 411

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Alexis convincingly examines the crisis in education from a Christian perspective. (Social Issues)

Integrating African American Literature in the Library and Classroom

Let My People Go: Bible Stories Told by a Freeman of Color to His Daughter, Charlotte, in Charleston, South Carolina, I806-l6. NewYork: Simon & Schuster, I998. About the Author Patricia (L'Ann) C(arwell) McKissack Biography.

Author: Dorothy Littlejohn Guthrie

Publisher: ABC-CLIO

ISBN: 9781598847529

Category: Language Arts & Disciplines

Page: 294

View: 438

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In this book, African American literature is illuminated through a project-based curriculum that incorporates national curriculum standards. • At least eight lesson plans per chapter that can be adapted for use with elementary, middle, and high school students • Extensions to each featured book, including activities for students in grades K–12 • Guided practice ideas for every book • Instructions and strategies for organizing and promoting an African American Book Awards Reading Program • A list of suggested videos, DVDs, and sound recordings to use with lesson designs • Multiple bibliographies of books, authors, and illustrators, and a list of relevant websites