Joseph Smith s Plural Wives Volume 1 Helen Mar Kimball

Joseph Smitha testimony she carried until the day she died. Her obituary noted that: “ During her childhood she was almost constantly associated with Joseph Smith the Prophet and his successor Brigham Young, and her recollections of ...

Author: L. Hannah Stoddard

Publisher: Joseph Smith Foundation

ISBN: 9781637523414

Category: Biography & Autobiography

Page: 288

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One of the most controversial facets of Latter-day Saint history is Joseph Smith’s practice of Celestial plural marriage. However, behind the controversy lies the oft-untold inspiring history of real women with successes, failures, trials, and legacies. Latter-day Saint women looking for exemplary heroines will be encouraged to discover female role models of strength, talent, intelligence, compassion, leadership, determination, and accomplishment. This series provides the reader with honest and faith-filled accounts from the perspective of the women—the forgotten mothers of the Restoration. "I've loved “getting to know” Helen through her very own words. From experiencing rejection and slander, the deaths of her children, a battle with debilitating, chronic illness, this woman has so much wisdom to share through her incredible story. How grateful I am that she left it for us! Heaven knows I need it!" Kate, 21-year-old YSA "I have been so inspired by Helen Mar Kimball! I am excited now about defending the Restoration. I don’t feel scared about diving into Church history. I just feel really grateful to have read this book." (Lexi, mother of 2) "Polygamy is not an easy subject for me. Helen’s reaction to plural marriage was human—it made me feel seen. I feel so grateful for this book because it introduced me to a strong, special woman who will be a dear example to follow in my life." (Iris, Latter-day Saint in France)

Joseph Smith s Polygamy Volume 1 History

Q. But you don't mean to say that Joseph Smith had that man's wife living with him as his wife? A. ... provided to help compile a list of all of Joseph's known plural wives.76 For example, Helen Mar Kimball Whitney recorded on June 27, ...

Author: Brian C. Hales

Publisher: Greg Kofford Books

ISBN:

Category: Religion

Page: 638

View: 876

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Few American religious figures have stirred more passion among adherents and antagonists than Joseph Smith. Born in 1805 and silenced thirty-nine years later by assassins’ bullets, he dictated more than one-hundred revelations, published books of new scripture, built a temple, organized several new cities, and became the proclaimed prophet to tens of thousands during his abbreviated life. Among his many novel teachings and practices, none is more controversial than plural marriage, a restoration of the Old Testament practice that he accepted as part of his divinely appointed mission. Joseph Smith taught his polygamy doctrines only in secret and dictated a revelation in July 1843 authorizing its practice (now LDS D&C 132) that was never published during his lifetime. Although rumors and exposés multiplied, it was not until 1852 that Mormons in Brigham Young’s Utah took a public stand. By then, thousands of Mormons were engaged in the practice that was seen as essential to salvation. Victorian America saw plural marriage as immoral and Joseph Smith as acting on libido. However, the private writings of Nauvoo participants and other polygamy insiders tell another, more complex and nuanced story. Many of these accounts have never been published. Others have been printed sporadically in unrelated publications. Drawing on every known historical account, whether by supporters or opponents, Volumes 1 and 2 take a fresh look at the chronology and development of Mormon polygamy, including the difficult conundrums of the Fannie Alger relationship, polyandry, the “angel with a sword” accounts, Emma Smith’s poignant response, and the possibility of Joseph Smith offspring by his plural wives. Among the most intriguing are the newly available Andrew Jenson papers containing not only the often-quoted statements by surviving plural wives but also Jenson’s own private research, conducted in the late nineteenth century. Telling the story of Joseph Smith’s polygamy from the records of those who knew him best, augmented by those who observed him from a distance, may have produced the most useful view of all.

Joseph Smith s Polygamy Volume 3 Theology

One of Joseph Smith's plural wives, Helen Mar Kimball Whitney taught, “Our children are considered stars in a mother's crown, and the more there are, if righteous, the more glory they will add to her and their father's eternal kingdom.

Author: Brian C. Hales

Publisher: Greg Kofford Books

ISBN:

Category: Religion

Page: 332

View: 151

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Americans of Joseph Smith’s day, steeped in the stories and prophecies of the King James Bible, certainly knew about plural marriage; but it was a curiosity relegated to the misty past of patriarchs Abraham and Jacob, who never gave reasons for their polygamy. It was long abandoned, Christians understood, by the time Jesus set forth the dominating law of the New Testament. But how did Joseph Smith understand it? Where did it fit in the “restitution of all things” (Acts 3:21) predicted in the New Testament? What part did it play in the global ideology declared by this modern prophet who produced new scripture, new revelation, and new theology? During Joseph Smith’s lifetime, polygamy was taught and practiced in intense secrecy, with the result that he never fully explained its doctrinal underpinnings or systematized its practice. As a result, reconstructing Joseph Smith’s theology of plurality is a task that has seldom been undertaken. Most theological examinations have either focused on its development during Brigham Young’s Utah period, with its need to resist increasing federal legislative and judicial pressures, or the efforts of twentieth-century and contemporary “fundamentalists” who continue to marry a plurality of wives. Volume 3 of this three-volume work builds on the carefully reconstructed history of the development of Mormon polygamy during Joseph Smith’s lifetime, then assembles the doctrinal principles from his recorded addresses, the diary entries of those closely associated with him, and his broader teachings on the related topics of obedience to God’s will, marriage and family relations, and the mechanics of eternal progression, salvation, and exaltation. The revelation he dictated in July 1843 that authorized the practice of eternal and plural marriage receives unprecedented examination and careful interpretation that illuminate this significant document and its underlying doctrines. Attempts to explain the history of Joseph Smith’s polygamy without comprehending the theological principles undergirding its practice will always be incomplete and skewed. This volume, which takes those principles and evidences with the utmost seriousness, has produced the most important explanation of “why” this ancient practice reemerged among the Latter-day Saints on the shores of the Mississippi in the early 1840s.

The Mormon Delusion Volume 1 The Truth Behind Polygamy and Secret Polyandry

Smith's death, Sarah became a plural wife of Heber C. Kimball. ... Helen Mar Kimball No children listed. Helen's father, Heber Chase Kimball, persuaded Helen to marry Joseph Smith against her wishes when she was only fourteen.

Author: Jim Whitefield

Publisher: Lulu Press, Inc

ISBN: 9781326785642

Category: Religion

Page:

View: 424

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The first in a series of books comprising an exposé of the Mormon Church (The Church of Jesus Christ of Latter Day Saints). This volume concentrates on polygamy and little known polyandry which is hidden from rank and file Mormons. Historical evidence proves the Mormon Church has rewritten its own history through lies, suppression, omission and interpolation; such that the truth is so well hidden from members; unless they look outside the Church for information; they will never know of the continued conspiracy to deceive them. Contains over 120 pages of appendices, including complete lists and analysis of all the wives and families of Joseph Smith, Brigham Young and Heber C. Kimball, highlighting polyandrous relationships and children born into those unions; plus details of over a hundred children born post 1890 to polygamous wives of General Authorities who violated their own canonised Manifesto after they had covenanted to stop the practice. Visit www.themormondelusion.com for further information.

Joseph Smith s Polygamy Volume 2 History

store, 1:50 on William Smith, 2:34–35 Whitaker, John Mills, 2:157 sealed daughter Sarah Ann/JS, 1:502, White, Emeline, ... 1:403 funeral of, 1:224 introduced to Helen Mar as JS plural in Endowed Quorum, 2:446 wife, 2:26 letter from JS, ...

Author: Brian C. Hales

Publisher: Greg Kofford Books

ISBN:

Category: Religion

Page: 602

View: 676

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Few American religious figures have stirred more passion among adherents and antagonists than Joseph Smith. Born in 1805 and silenced thirty-nine years later by assassins’ bullets, he dictated more than one-hundred revelations, published books of new scripture, built a temple, organized several new cities, and became the proclaimed prophet to tens of thousands during his abbreviated life. Among his many novel teachings and practices, none is more controversial than plural marriage, a restoration of the Old Testament practice that he accepted as part of his divinely appointed mission. Joseph Smith taught his polygamy doctrines only in secret and dictated a revelation in July 1843 authorizing its practice (now LDS D&C 132) that was never published during his lifetime. Although rumors and exposés multiplied, it was not until 1852 that Mormons in Brigham Young’s Utah took a public stand. By then, thousands of Mormons were engaged in the practice that was seen as essential to salvation. Victorian America saw plural marriage as immoral and Joseph Smith as acting on libido. However, the private writings of Nauvoo participants and other polygamy insiders tell another, more complex and nuanced story. Many of these accounts have never been published. Others have been printed sporadically in unrelated publications. Drawing on every known historical account, whether by supporters or opponents, Volumes 1 and 2 take a fresh look at the chronology and development of Mormon polygamy, including the difficult conundrums of the Fannie Alger relationship, polyandry, the “angel with a sword” accounts, Emma Smith’s poignant response, and the possibility of Joseph Smith offspring by his plural wives. Among the most intriguing are the newly available Andrew Jenson papers containing not only the often-quoted statements by surviving plural wives but also Jenson’s own private research, conducted in the late nineteenth century. Telling the story of Joseph Smith’s polygamy from the records of those who knew him best, augmented by those who observed him from a distance, may have produced the most useful view of all.

Interpreter A Journal of Mormon Scripture Volume 11 2014

16 Primary sources include the History of the Church (4), Times and Seasons (4), Nauvoo City Council Minutes (3), William Clayton's journal (2), Helen Mar Kimball's Why We Practice Plural Marriage (1), Joseph Smith's journal (2), ...

Author: Daniel C. Peterson

Publisher: The Interpreter Foundation

ISBN: 9781502815460

Category: Religion

Page: 294

View: 504

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This is volume 11 (2014) of Interpreter: A Journal of Mormon Scripture published by The Interpreter Foundation. It contains articles on a variety of topics including the resurrection, meat and the Word of Wisdom, Book of Mormon geography, the language of the Book of Mormon, changes in the Book of Mormon, a review of Beam's American Crucifixion, and a look at "nonstandard" Book of Mormon grammar.

Kingdom of Nauvoo The Rise and Fall of a Religious Empire on the American Frontier

John Wickliffe Rigdon to Arthur Willing, quoted in Hales, Joseph Smith's Polygamy, 1:504. (The letter refers to a conversation with Elizabeth Whitney in 1863.) The concern about Horace is documented in Helen Mar Kimball Whitney, ...

Author: Benjamin E. Park

Publisher: Liveright Publishing

ISBN: 9781631494871

Category: History

Page: 336

View: 557

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An extraordinary story of faith and violence in nineteenth-century America, based on previously confidential documents from the Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints. Compared to the Puritans, Mormons have rarely gotten their due, treated as fringe cultists at best or marginalized as polygamists unworthy of serious examination at worst. In Kingdom of Nauvoo, the historian Benjamin E. Park excavates the brief life of a lost Mormon city, and in the process demonstrates that the Mormons are, in fact, essential to understanding American history writ large. Drawing on newly available sources from the LDS Church—sources that had been kept unseen in Church archives for 150 years—Park recreates one of the most dramatic episodes of the 19th century frontier. Founded in Western Illinois in 1839 by the Mormon prophet Joseph Smith and his followers, Nauvoo initially served as a haven from mob attacks the Mormons had endured in neighboring Missouri, where, in one incident, seventeen men, women, and children were massacred, and where the governor declared that all Mormons should be exterminated. In the relative safety of Nauvoo, situated on a hill and protected on three sides by the Mississippi River, the industrious Mormons quickly built a religious empire; at its peak, the city surpassed Chicago in population, with more than 12,000 inhabitants. The Mormons founded their own army, with Smith as its general; established their own courts; and went so far as to write their own constitution, in which they declared that there could be no separation of church and state, and that the world was to be ruled by Mormon priests. This experiment in religious utopia, however, began to unravel when gentiles in the countryside around Nauvoo heard rumors of a new Mormon marital practice. More than any previous work, Kingdom of Nauvoo pieces together the haphazard and surprising emergence of Mormon polygamy, and reveals that most Mormons were not participants themselves, though they too heard the rumors, which said that Joseph Smith and other married Church officials had been “sealed” to multiple women. Evidence of polygamy soon became undeniable, and non-Mormons reacted with horror, as did many Mormons—including Joseph Smith’s first wife, Emma Smith, a strong-willed woman who resisted the strictures of her deeply patriarchal community and attempted to save her Church, and family, even when it meant opposing her husband and prophet. A raucous, violent, character-driven story, Kingdom of Nauvoo raises many of the central questions of American history, and even serves as a parable for the American present. How far does religious freedom extend? Can religious and other minority groups survive in a democracy where the majority dictates the law of the land? The Mormons of Nauvoo, who initially believed in the promise of American democracy, would become its strongest critics. Throughout his absorbing chronicle, Park shows the many ways in which the Mormons were representative of their era, and in doing so elevates nineteenth century Mormon history into the American mainstream.

Heber C Kimball

3. See Danel W. Bachman , “ A Study of the Mormon Practice of Plural Marriage before the Death of Joseph Smith ” ( unpublished M.A. thesis , Purdue University , 1975 ) . 4. H. M. Whitney , Woman's Exponent , vol . 11 ( Mar. 1 , 1883 ) ...

Author: Stanley B. Kimball

Publisher: University of Illinois Press

ISBN: 0252012992

Category: Biography & Autobiography

Page: 388

View: 859

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Heber Chase Kimball (1801-1868) was born in Sheldon, Vermont to Solomon Farnham Kimball and Anna Spaulding. In 1831 he joined the LDS Church and in 1835 he became and apostle. he served for a number of years as a counselor to Brigham Young. Heber was married to forty-three women and was the father of sixty-five children.

Interpreter A Journal of Mormon Scripture Volume 12 2014

Verily thus saith the Lord unto my servant N. K. Whitney the thing that my servant Joseph Smith has made known unto you ... you from generation to generation” is Joseph's plural marriage to Sarah, which is an incomplete interpretation.

Author: Daniel C. Peterson

Publisher: The Interpreter Foundation

ISBN: 9781505670363

Category: Religion

Page: 348

View: 970

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This is volume 12 (2014) of Interpreter: A Journal of Mormon Scripture published by The Interpreter Foundation. It contains articles on a variety of topics including thoughts on reason and experience, two reviews of Wunderli's An Imperfect Book, a postmodernist reading of 1 and 2 Nephi, axes mundi in Mesoamerica and the Book of Mormon, a review of Hartley's Ngā Mahi: The Things We Need to Do, a note on the name Judah and antisemitism, an LDS/temple reading of the book of Job, a response to Grant Palmer's "Sexual Allegations against Joseph Smith and the Beginnings of Polygamy in Nauvoo," the genetic legacy of America's indigenous populations and the Book of Mormon, and the divine feminine in various texts including Mormon scriptures.

Interpreter A Journal of Mormon Scripture Volume 6 2013

That the ancient order of plural marriage was again to be practiced by the Church.”7 A few years later in 1841, Joseph Smith even attempted to broach the topic publicly. Helen Mar Kimball remembered: “He [Joseph] astonished his hearers ...

Author: The Interpreter Foundation

Publisher: The Interpreter Foundation

ISBN: 9781493534180

Category: Religion

Page: 220

View: 587

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This is volume 6 (2013) of Interpreter: A Journal of Mormon Scripture published by The Interpreter Foundation. It contains articles on a variety of topics including apologetics, a review of Miller's Rube Goldberg Machines, a note on Mosiah 2:5, a review of MacCulloch's The Reformation, a review of Noll's Protestantism, a look at Peter's denial of Christ, an essay on the Lamanites in a Native American context, an essay on Mormon jurisprudence, a review of Mansfield's The Mormonizing of America, reviews of six books on evolutionary biology, and a review of Bergera's critique of Joseph Smith’s Polygamy: History and Theology.