In Reckless Hands Skinner v Oklahoma and the Near Triumph of American Eugenics

Combining engrossing narrative with sharp legal analysis, Victoria F. Nourse explains the consequences of this landmark decision, still vital today—and reveals the stories of these forgotten men and women who fought for human dignity and ...

Author: Victoria F. Nourse

Publisher: W. W. Norton & Company

ISBN: 9780393069648

Category: Law

Page: 256

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The disturbing, forgotten history of America’s experiment with eugenics. In the 1920s and 1930s, thousands of men and women were sterilized at asylums and prisons across America. Believing that criminality and mental illness were inherited, state legislatures passed laws calling for the sterilization of “habitual criminals” and the “feebleminded.” But in 1936, inmates at Oklahoma’s McAlester prison refused to cooperate; a man named Jack Skinner was the first to come to trial. A colorful and heroic cast of characters—from the inmates themselves to their devoted, self-taught lawyer—would fight the case all the way to the U.S. Supreme Court. Only after Americans learned the extent of another large-scale eugenics project—in Nazi Germany—would the inmates triumph. Combining engrossing narrative with sharp legal analysis, Victoria F. Nourse explains the consequences of this landmark decision, still vital today—and reveals the stories of these forgotten men and women who fought for human dignity and the basic right to have a family.

Three Generations No Imbeciles

Eugenics, the Supreme Court, and Buck v. ... Skinner v. Oklahoma, 316 U.S.535 (1942) 538. 60. Skinner v. Oklahoma, at 541,542. 61. Justice William O. Douglas, ... Near Triumph of American Eugenics (New York: W. W. Norton, 2008). 73.

Author: Paul A. Lombardo

Publisher: JHU Press

ISBN: 9781421443195

Category: Medical

Page: 424

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I highly recommend it."—Psychiatric Services

The History and Growth of Judicial Review Volume 1

Criminal violence against African Americans also became much more common. ... The best book on this subject is Victoria F. Nourse, In Reckless Hands: Skinner v. Oklahoma ... Oklahoma and the Near- Triumph of American Eugenics (2008).

Author: Steven Gow Calabresi

Publisher: Oxford University Press

ISBN: 9780190075798

Category: Law

Page: 384

View: 298

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This two-volume set examines the origins and growth of judicial review in the key G-20 constitutional democracies, which include the United States, the United Kingdom, France, Germany, Japan, Italy, India, Canada, Australia, South Korea, Brazil, South Africa, Indonesia, Mexico, and the European Union, as well as Israel. The volumes consider five different theories, which help to explain the origins of judicial review, and identify which theories apply best in the various countries discussed. They consider not only what gives rise to judicial review originally, but also what causes of judicial review lead it to become more powerful and prominent over time. Volume One discusses the G-20 common law countries and Israel.

The History and Growth of Judicial Review Volume 1

Criminal violence against African Americans also became much more common. ... The best book on this subject is Victoria F. Nourse, In Reckless Hands: Skinner v. Oklahoma ... Oklahoma and the Near- Triumph of American Eugenics (2008).

Author: Steven Gow Calabresi

Publisher: Oxford University Press

ISBN: 9780190075774

Category: Law

Page: 456

View: 878

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"This book examines the origins and growth of judicial review in the key G-20 constitutional democracies, which include: the United States; the United Kingdom; France; Germany; Japan; Italy; India; Canada; Australia; South Korea; Brazil; South Africa; Indonesia; Mexico; and the European Union. The book considers five different theories, which help to explain the origins of judicial review, and it identifies which theories apply best in the various countries discussed. It considers not on what gives rise to judicial review originally, but also what causes of judicial review lead it to become more powerful and prominent over times. The positive account of what causes the origins and growth of judicial review in so many very different countries over such a long period of time has normative implications"--

A Century of Eugenics in America

Skinner v. Oklahoma, 316 U.s. 535 (1942). 44. see generally Victoria F. nourse, In Reckless Hands: skinner v. oklahoma and the Near-Triumph of American Eugenics (new York: norton, 2008). 45. Journal of the Senate of the State of Indiana ...

Author: Paul A. Lombardo

Publisher: Indiana University Press

ISBN: 9780253222695

Category: Medical

Page: 251

View: 617

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In 1907, Indiana passed the world's first involuntary sterilization law based on the theory of eugenics. In time, more than 30 states and a dozen foreign countries followed suit. Although the Indiana statute was later declared unconstitutional, other laws restricting immigration and regulating marriage on "eugenic" grounds were still in effect in the U.S. as late as the 1970s. A Century of Eugenics in America assesses the history of eugenics in the United States and its status in the age of the Human Genome Project. The essays explore the early support of compulsory sterilization by doctors and legislators; the implementation of eugenic schemes in Indiana, Georgia, California, Minnesota, North Carolina, and Alabama; the legal and social challenges to sterilization; and the prospects for a eugenics movement basing its claims on modern genetic science.

The New Eugenics

Oklahoma, 316 U.S. 535 (1942). For a thorough description and analysis of the events and implications surrounding the Skinner case, see Victoria F. Nourse, In Reckless Hands: Skinner v. Oklahoma and the Near-Triumph of American Eugenics ...

Author: Judith Daar

Publisher: Yale University Press

ISBN: 9780300229035

Category: Law

Page: 288

View: 786

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A provocative examination of how unequal access to reproductive technology replays the sins of the eugenics movement Eugenics, the effort to improve the human species by inhibiting reproduction of “inferior” genetic strains, ultimately came to be regarded as the great shame of the Progressive movement. Judith Daar, a prominent expert on the intersection of law and medicine, argues that current attitudes toward the potential users of modern assisted reproductive technologies threaten to replicate eugenics’ same discriminatory practices. In this book, Daar asserts how barriers that block certain people’s access to reproductive technologies are often founded on biases rooted in notions of class, race, and marital status. As a result, poor, minority, unmarried, disabled, and LGBT individuals are denied technologies available to well-off nonminority heterosexual applicants. An original argument on a highly emotional and important issue, this work offers a surprising departure from more familiar arguments on the issue as it warns physicians, government agencies, and the general public against repeating the mistakes of the past.

Feminist Judgments Reproductive Justice Rewritten

7 By the time the Supreme Court decided Skinner v. ... In Reckless Hands: Skinner v. Oklahoma and the Near Triumph of American Eugenics at 31 (W.W. Norton 2008), quoting Lawrence Friedman, American Law in the Twentieth Century at 110 ...

Author: Kimberly Mutcherson

Publisher: Cambridge University Press

ISBN: 9781108425438

Category: Health & Fitness

Page: 450

View: 668

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Reproductive justice theory made real through re-imagining critical cases addressing pregnancy, parenting, and the law's treatment of marginalized women.

Birth Rights and Wrongs

See Thomas C. Leonard, Illiberal Reformers: Race, Eugenics & American Economics in the Progressive Era 189–91 ... Victoria F. Nourse, In Reckless Hands: Skinner v. Oklahoma and the Near Triumph of American Eugenics 91 (2008). Skinner v.

Author: Dov Fox

Publisher: Oxford University Press, USA

ISBN: 9780190675721

Category: Law

Page: 248

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Millions of Americans rely on the likes of birth control, IVF, and genetic testing to make plans as intimate and farreaching as any over a lifetime. This is no less than the medicine of miracles. It fills empty cradles, frees families from terrible disease, and empowers them to fashion their lives on their own terms. But accidents happen. Pharmacists mix up pills. Lab techs misread tests. Obstetricians tell women their healthy fetuses would be stillborn. Political and economic forces conspire against regulation. And judges throw up their hands when professionals foist parenthood on people who didn't want it, or childlessness on those who did. Failed abortions, switched donors, and lost embryos may be first-world problems. But these aren't innocent lapses or harmless errors. They're wrongs in need of rights. This book lifts the curtain on reproductive negligence, gives voice to the lives it upends, and vindicates the interests that advances in medicine and technology bring to full expression. It charts the legal universe of errors that: (1) deprive pregnancy or parenthood of people who set out to pursue them; (2) impose pregnancy or parenthood on those who tried to avoid these roles; or (3) confound efforts to have a child with or without certain genetic traits. This novel architecture forces citizens and courts to rethink the reproductive controversies of our time, and equips us to meet the new challenges-from womb transplants to gene editing-that lie just over the horizon.

Term Paper Resource Guide to African American History

English, Daylanne K. Unnatural Selections: Eugenics in American Modernism and the Harlem Renaissance. ... Nourse, Victoria F. In Reckless Hands: Skinner v. Oklahoma and the Near-Triumph of American Eugenics. New York: W.W. Norton, 2008.

Author: Caryn E. Neumann

Publisher: Greenwood

ISBN: 9780313355028

Category: Reference

Page: 304

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Major help for African American history term papers has arrived to enrich and stimulate students in challenging and enjoyable ways. Students from high school age to undergraduate will be able to get a jump start on assignments with the hundreds of term paper projects and research information offered here in an easy-to-use format. Users can quickly choose from the 100 important events, spanning from the expansion of the slave trade to North America in 1581 to the devastation of Hurricane Katrina in 2005. Each event entry begins with a brief summary to pique interest and then offers original and thought-provoking term paper ideas in both standard and alternative formats that often incorporate the latest in electronic media, such as iPod and iMovie. The best in primary and secondary sources for further research are then annotated, followed by vetted, stable Web site suggestions and multimedia resources, usually films, for further viewing and listening. Librarians and faculty will want to use this as well. With this book, the research experience is transformed and elevated. Term Paper Resource Guide to African American History is an invaluable source to motivate and educate students who have a wide range of interests and talents. The events chronicle the long struggle for freedom and equal rights for African Americans.

Eugenics

... American Eugenics, and the Sterilization of Carrie Buck (New York: Penguin Press, 2016); and Victoria F. Nourse, In Reckless Hands: Skinner v. Oklahoma and the Near-Triumph of American Eugenics (New York: Norton, 2008).

Author: Philippa Levine

Publisher: Oxford University Press

ISBN: 9780199385904

Category: History

Page: 176

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In 1883, Francis Galton, a cousin of Charles Darwin, coined the word "eugenics" to express his dream of perfecting the human race by applying the laws of genetic heredity. Adapting Darwin's theory of evolution to human society, eugenics soon became a powerful, international movement, committed to using the principles of heredity and statistics to encourage healthy and discourage unhealthy reproduction. Early in the twentieth century and across the world, doctors, social reformers, and politicians turned to the new science of eugenics as a means to improve and strengthen their populations. Eugenics advocates claimed their methods would result in healthier, fitter babies and would dramatically limit human suffering. The reality was a different story. In the name of scientific progress and of human improvement, eugenicists targeted the weak and the sick, triggering coercive legislation on issues as disparate as race, gender, immigration, euthanasia, abortion, sterilization, intelligence, mental illness, and disease control. Nationalists eagerly embraced eugenics as a means to legitimize their countries' superiority and racialized assumptions, and the Nazis notoriously used eugenics to shape their "final solution." In this lucid volume, Philippa Levine tackles the intricate and controversial history of eugenics, masterfully synthesizing the enormous range of policies and experiments carried out in the name of eugenics around the world throughout the twentieth century. She questions the widespread belief that eugenics disappeared after World War II and evaluates the impact of eugenics on current reproductive and genetic sciences. Charting the development of such controversial practices as artificial insemination, sperm donation, and population control, this book offers a powerful, extraordinarily timely reflection on the frequent interplay between genetics and ethics. Eugenics may no longer be a household word, but we feel its effects even today.