Bloody Williamson

This is a horror story of native American violence.

Author: Paul M. Angle

Publisher: Knopf

ISBN: 9780804152778

Category: True Crime

Page: 300

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This is a horror story of native American violence. It carries a grim lesson for the whole country. Political doctrines have played no part in the violence and murder that have brought much ill fame to one corner of Illinois. On the map, Williamson is just another county. But in history it is a place in which a strange disease has raged for more than eighty years—a disease marked by a pathological tendency to settle differences by force. Fascinated by this, Paul M. Angle, the well-known historian, set out to discover what really had happened. Through enormous research he has been able to reconstruct the whole story in all its horrible, scarifying detail. Using the best techniques of reportage, without editorializing, without subjective coloration, he has produced a narrative beyond imagination. It begins with the "Bloody Vendetta," a feud that rampaged in the 1870s. It deals with labor's success in organizing coal mines in southern Illinois, an affair that twice blew up in violence. It covers the Herrin Massacre of 1922—perhaps the most shocking episode in the history of organized labor in this country—and the subsequent trials. The Ku Klux Klan provides material for four chapters that come to a climax in a fatal duel between the Klan and its opponents. And it ends with the story of the gang war between Charlie Birger and the Shelton brothers. It is a tale to shake the most phlegmatic reader.

Bloody Williamson

Williamson County in southern Illinois has been the scene of almost unparalleled violence, from the Bloody Vendetta between two families in the 1870s through the Herrin Massacre of 1922, Ku Klux Klan activities that ended in fatalities, and ...

Author: Paul M. Angle

Publisher: University of Illinois Press

ISBN: 0252062337

Category: History

Page: 314

View: 956

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Williamson County in southern Illinois has been the scene of almost unparalleled violence, from the Bloody Vendetta between two families in the 1870s through the Herrin Massacre of 1922, Ku Klux Klan activities that ended in fatalities, and the gang war of the 1920s between the Charlie Birger and Shelton brothers gangs. Paul Angle was fascinated by this more-than-fifty-year history, and his account of violence has become a classic.

Sheriff

This 160 page book serves as a memoir of a lawman (Harry Spiller) from Williamson County, Illinois and tells of his stories and ventures as a sheriff.

Author: Harry Spiller

Publisher: Turner Publishing Company

ISBN: 1563115077

Category: Biography & Autobiography

Page: 160

View: 260

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This 160 page book serves as a memoir of a lawman (Harry Spiller) from Williamson County, Illinois and tells of his stories and ventures as a sheriff.

Bloody Williamson

The book begins with the "Bloody Vendetta," a feud that rampaged in the 1870s.

Author: Paul McClelland Angle

Publisher:

ISBN: OCLC:250823669

Category: Coal miners

Page: 299

View: 633

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The book begins with the "Bloody Vendetta," a feud that rampaged in the 1870s. It deals with labor's success in organizing coal mines in southern Illinois, an affair that twice blew up in violence. It covers the Herrin Massacre of 1922--perhaps the most shocking episode in the history of organized labor in this country--and the subsequent trials. The Ku Klux Klan provides material for four chapters that come to a climax in a fatal duel between the Klan and its opponents. And it ends with the story of the gang war between Charlie Birger and the Shelton brothers.

Williamson County Illinois Sesquicentennial History

"Bloody Williamson By Paula M. Davenport The Southern Illinoisan Reprinted with permission Headlines broadcast news of violence and bloodshed after the June 22, 1922, Herrin Massacre. Such reports likely first introduced the world to ...

Author: Stan J. Hale

Publisher: Turner Publishing Company

ISBN: 9780938021766

Category: History

Page: 503

View: 145

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Charlie and the Shawneetown Dame

With that established, the "rare documents" room was opened and I was given In Bloody Williamson, a privately printed and published book ... Williamson County during the Birger era, coauthored with one of his deputies, Jack Wilkinson.

Author: Donald Bain

Publisher: Purdue University Press

ISBN: 155753375X

Category: Biography & Autobiography

Page: 262

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Recounts one of the most famous turf wars waged during Prohibition, between Charlie Birger and the Shelton Brothers, brought to an end by Helen Holbrook from Shawneetown and Sheriff Pritchard before Birger could realize his dream of being "even bigger than Al Capone." Original

Herrin

Angle, Bloody Williamson, 183; Ayabe, “The Ku Klux Klan Movement,” 304, 308. 255. Angle, Bloody Williamson, 183–84; Ayabe, “The Ku Klux Klan Movement,” 322–25. 256. Ayabe, “The Ku Klux Klan Movement,” 327. 257. Angle, Bloody Williamson ...

Author: John Griswold

Publisher: Arcadia Publishing

ISBN: 9781625843197

Category: Photography

Page: 160

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Herrin, Illinois, has seen many dramatic events unfold in the nearly two hundred years since it was a bell-shaped prairie on the frontier. Now, Herrin native John Griswold, a writer and teacher at the University of Illinois, provides the first comprehensive history of this most American city, a place that in its time became not just a melting pot, but a cauldron. Discover why the coal was so good in the “Quality Circle” and what happened to the boom that followed its discovery. Explore the roots of the vicious Herrin Massacre of 1922 and learn why the entire nation has focused its gaze on this small Midwestern city so many times. Incorporating the most recent scholarship, interviews, and classic histories and narratives, this brief and entertaining history is illustrated with more than seventy-five archival photos that help tell this important American story.

The War on Alcohol Prohibition and the Rise of the American State

Klux Klan Movement in Williamson County,” 25–100. G. B. Young to Paul Angle, July 31, 1950; Irvin Young to Paul Angle, Sept. 7, 1950, Box 1, PAC; Angle, Bloody Williamson, 142–45; MR, Dec. 24, 1923, Dec. 26, 1924; CDT, Dec.

Author: Lisa McGirr

Publisher: W. W. Norton & Company

ISBN: 9780393248791

Category: History

Page: 384

View: 775

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“[This] fine history of Prohibition . . . could have a major impact on how we read American political history.”—James A. Morone, New York Times Book Review Prohibition has long been portrayed as a “noble experiment” that failed, a newsreel story of glamorous gangsters, flappers, and speakeasies. Now at last Lisa McGirr dismantles this cherished myth to reveal a much more significant history. Prohibition was the seedbed for a pivotal expansion of the federal government, the genesis of our contemporary penal state. Her deeply researched, eye-opening account uncovers patterns of enforcement still familiar today: the war on alcohol was waged disproportionately in African American, immigrant, and poor white communities. Alongside Jim Crow and other discriminatory laws, Prohibition brought coercion into everyday life and even into private homes. Its targets coalesced into an electoral base of urban, working-class voters that propelled FDR to the White House. This outstanding history also reveals a new genome for the activist American state, one that shows the DNA of the right as well as the left. It was Herbert Hoover who built the extensive penal apparatus used by the federal government to combat the crime spawned by Prohibition. The subsequent federal wars on crime, on drugs, and on terror all display the inheritances of the war on alcohol. McGirr shows the powerful American state to be a bipartisan creation, a legacy not only of the New Deal and the Great Society but also of Prohibition and its progeny. The War on Alcohol is history at its best—original, authoritative, and illuminating of our past and its continuing presence today.

The Dealmakers of Downstate Illinois

They influenced bloody eruptions during the 1920s in Williamson, Franklin, and Saline counties. As Paul M. Angle wrote in Bloody Williamson, his classic account of murder and mayhem connected to mining, “Almost without exception they ...

Author: Robert E Hartley

Publisher: SIU Press

ISBN: 9780809334759

Category: History

Page: 194

View: 512

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Many people are unaware that from 1945 to 1975, downstate lawmakers dominated the Illinois political arena. In TheDealmakers of Downstate Illinois, Robert E. Hartley details the lives and contributions of three influential southern Illinois politicians, Paul Powell, Clyde Choate, and John Stelle. He describes how these “dealmakers” were able to work with Democrats and Republicans throughout the state to bring jobs and facilities to their region. Using a variety of coalitions, they maintained downstate political strength in the face of growing Chicago influence. Hartley traces the personal histories of Powell, Choate, and Stelle, shows how they teamed up to advance a downstate political agenda, and reviews their challenges and successes. Beginning with an account of early experiences, including the battlefield courage that earned Choate the Medal of Honor as well as Stelle’s World War I experience and later entrepreneurship, the book continues with an exploration of the groundwork for their collaborative legislative agenda and their roles in the growth of Southern Illinois University and the passage of income tax legislation. Hartley reviews the importance of Powell’s relationship with Governor Stratton, Choate’s leadership of the 1972 Democratic National Convention and his relationships with Governor Walker and with Chicago interests. The Dealmakers of Downstate Illinois is a vivid, straightforward tale of fighting in the legislative chambers, backstabbing behind the scenes, and trading special favors for votes in pursuit of not only personal gain but also the advancement of a regional agenda.

The Herrin Massacre of 1922

Unless otherwise noted, the main source for this chapter is Williamson County Illinois in the World War by Hal W. ... “The tangled and complex story”: There are several good books on the Bloody Vendetta, including Bloody Williamson by ...

Author: Greg Bailey

Publisher: McFarland

ISBN: 9781476642215

Category: History

Page: 178

View: 833

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In 1922, a coal miner strike spread across the United States, swallowing the heavily-unionized mining town of Herrin, Illinois. When the owner of the town's local mine hired non-union workers to break the strike, violent conflict broke out between the strikebreakers and unionized miners, who were all heavily armed. When strikebreakers surrendered and were promised safe passage home, the unionized miners began executing them before large, cheering crowds. This book tells the cruel truth behind the story that the coal industry tried to suppress and that Herrin wants to forget. A thorough account of the massacre and its aftermath, this book sets a heartland tragedy against the rise and decline of the coal industry.

The Flying Circus

“Let me be the first to welcome you to Bloody Williamson.” “Bloody Williamson?” Gil and Henry asked together. “Don't you folks read the newspaper? Mine trouble. Strikes. Been nothin' but beatin's and guns and lynchin' round here for ...

Author: Susan Crandall

Publisher: Simon and Schuster

ISBN: 9781476772165

Category: Fiction

Page: 384

View: 132

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"A novel about the beginning years of aviation"--

Bloody Breathitt

Environmental factors were not to blame, Redfield surmised, since expatriated southerners carried it with them even when they left the former war zone—as in Illinois's “bloody Williamson” County, where “a feud among families or factions ...

Author: T.R.C. Hutton

Publisher: University Press of Kentucky

ISBN: 9780813142432

Category: History

Page: 444

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This book uses the history of Breathitt County, Kentucky, to examine political violence in the United States and its interpretation in media and memory. Violence in Breathitt County, during and after the Civil War, usually reflected what was going on elsewhere in Kentucky and the American South. In turn, the types of violence recorded there corresponded with discernible political scenarios.

Herrin Massacre

Written by Scott Doody, this four year adventure uncovers the ugly secret of what happens when a town buries their past so deep, it changes their future.

Author: Scott Doody

Publisher: Lulu Press, Inc

ISBN: 9781312744455

Category: History

Page:

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Twenty three men killed in Williamson County and the streets of Herrin, Illinois over a two day killing spree on June 21st and 22nd, 1922. The largest mass murder of non-union labor in the history of America. The event would become known around the world as The Herrin Massacre. Read about the toughest (deadliest) little city in America and the modern day hunt for the massacre victim's lost graves in the potter's field of the Herrin city cemetery. Written by Scott Doody, this four year adventure uncovers the ugly secret of what happens when a town buries their past so deep, it changes their future.

A Knight of Another Sort

Bibliography B00ks Angle, Paul M. Bloody Williamson. New York: Alfred A. Knopf, 1952. Galligan, George, and Jack Wilkinson. In Bloody Williamson. Oklahoma City: Leader Press, 1927. Hill, E. Bishop. Complete History of the Southern ...

Author: Gary DeNeal

Publisher: SIU Press

ISBN: 9780809322176

Category: Biography & Autobiography

Page: 275

View: 458

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In 1913 Charlie Birger began his career as a bootlegger, supplying southern Illinois with whiskey and beer. He was charismatic, with an easygoing manner and a cavalier generosity that made him popular. The stuff of legend, he was part monster, part Robin Hood. In the early days, he would emerge from his restaurant/saloon in tiny Ledford in Saline County with a cigar box full of coins and throw handfuls in the air for the children. Echoing the consensus on Birger, an anonymous gang member called him "enigmatic," noting that "he had a wonderful quality, a heart of gold. There in Harrisburg sometimes he'd support twelve or fifteen families, buy coal, groceries. . . . [But] he had cold eyes, a killer's eyes. He would kill you for something somebody else would punch you in the nose for." Drawing from the colorful cast of the living, the dead, and the soon-to-be-dead—a state shared by many associated with Birger and his enemies, the Shelton gang—DeNeal re-creates Prohibition-era southern Illinois. He depicts the fatal shootout between S. Glenn Young and Ora Thomas, the battle on the Herrin Masonic Temple lawn in which six were slain and the Ku Klux Klan crushed, and the wounding of Williamson County state's attorney Arlie O. Boswell. As the gang wars escalated and the roster of corpses lengthened, the gangsters embraced technology. The Sheltons bombed Birger's roadhouse, Shady Rest, from a single-engine airplane. Both Birger and the Sheltons used armored vehicles to intimidate their enemies, and the chatter of machine gun fire grew common. The gang wars ended with massive arrests, trials, and convictions of gangsters who once had seemed invincible. Charlie Birger was convicted of the murder of West City mayor Joe Adams and sentenced to death. On April 19, 1928, he stood on the gallows looking down on the large crowd that had come to see him die. "It's a beautiful world," Birger said softly as he prepared to leave it.

Commonsense Anticommunism

Paul M. Angle wrote the definitive account of the Herrin Massacre in Bloody Williamson: A Chapter in American Lawlessness. 43. “Investigation of Rioting at Strip Mine,” Iune 27, 1922, Herrin Massacre file, Federal Bureau of ...

Author: Jennifer Luff

Publisher: Univ of North Carolina Press

ISBN: 9780807835418

Category: History

Page: 288

View: 966

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Between the Great War and Pearl Harbor, conservative labor leaders declared themselves America's "first line of defense" against Communism. In this surprising account, Jennifer Luff shows how the American Federation of Labor fanned popular anticommunism b

Woman from Spillertown

Angle , in Bloody Williamson , acknowledges use of EAW's " Bloody Williamson County " and ABW's " Ku Kluxing " and ( 137-38 , without attribution ) quotes from her conclusion . 50. ABW , " Ku Kluxing . " 51. Ibid . 52.

Author: David Thoreau Wieck

Publisher: SIU Press

ISBN: 0809316196

Category: Biography & Autobiography

Page: 280

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Kathryn Kish Sklar calls this work "a major contribution to our historical understanding of the role of women in organizing American miners in the twentieth century." Agnes Burns Wieck was a crusading labor organizer, an activist known as "the Mother Jones of Illinois." This first book-length biography is a unique portrait of her energy and unremitting dedication to social justice. Wieck organized miners' wives and led a movement of Illinois coalfield women. She used her talents as a journalist and a public speaker to campaign for a decent standard of living, for good schools and working conditions in communities free of corporate domination, and for union democracy, racial equality, and acceptance of women in political life.

The Great Chicago Fire and the Myth of Mrs O Leary s Cow

For example, in Bloody Williamson, an account of a ¡922 southern Illinois labor massacre, historian Paul Angle noted that a “peglegged” strikebreaker had a cork leg. See “The Great Fire,” Chicago Tribune, 26 November ¡87¡, p.

Author: Richard F. Bales

Publisher: McFarland

ISBN: 9781476604763

Category: History

Page: 350

View: 749

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The Great Chicago Fire of 1871 swallowed up more than three square miles in two days, leaving thousands homeless and 300 dead. Throughout history, the fire has been attributed to Mrs. O’Leary, an immigrant Irish milkmaid, and her cow. On one level, the tale of Mrs. O’Leary’s cow is merely the quintessential urban legend. But the story also represents a means by which the upper classes of Chicago could blame the fire’s chaos on a member of the working poor. Although that fire destroyed the official county documents, some land tract records were saved. Using this and other primary source information, Richard F. Bales created a scale drawing that reconstructed the O’Leary neighborhood. Next he turned to the transcripts—more than 1,100 handwritten pages—from an investigation conducted by the Board of Police and Fire Commissioners, which interviewed 50 people over the course of 12 days. The board’s final report, published in the Chicago newspapers on December 12, 1871, indicates that commissioners were unable to determine the cause of the fire. And yet, by analyzing the 50 witnesses’ testimonies, the author concludes that the commissioners could have determined the cause of the fire had they desired to do so. Being more concerned with saving their own reputation from post-fire reports of incompetence, drunkenness and bribery, the commissioners failed to press forward for an answer. The author has uncovered solid evidence as to what really caused the Great Chicago Fire.