Dutch Immigrant Women in the United States 1880 1920

Lively and absorbing, the stories of these women's lives are told largely in their own words as preserved in personal letters and diaries.

Author: Suzanne M. Sinke

Publisher: University of Illinois Press

ISBN: 0252027310

Category: History

Page: 295

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In this deftly researched ethnographic portrait, Suzanne M. Sinke skillfully adapts the concept of social reproduction to examine the shifting gender roles of tens of thousands of Dutch Protestant women who crossed the Atlantic from 1880 to 1920 to make new homes in the United States. Examining the domain of the home as well as the related realms of education, religion, healthcare, and worldview, Sinke discerns women's contributions to the creation and adaptation of families and communities, pointing out how they differed from those of men. Through Sinke's articulate and captivating descriptions of real women, the statistical evidence comes to life, providing valuable and heretofore unexamined views on the international marriage market, language shifts, the acquisition of American customs, the church's role in adaptation, and the shifting economies that allowed women to work outside of the home. A parallel analysis of the United States and the Netherlands as developing welfare states provides a fascinating look at what Dutch immigrant women left behind compared to what they faced in America regarding healthcare, education, and quality-of-life issues. Lively and absorbing, the stories of these women's lives are told largely in their own words as preserved in personal letters and diaries. Supplemented by photographs and accounts from archived interviews and Dutch American newspapers, each chapter includes an in-depth portrait of one Dutch immigrant woman and multiple examples from the lives of others. Effectively giving voice to the women who shaped Dutch American culture, Dutch Immigrant Women in the United States, 1880-1920 is an important and groundbreaking contribution to immigration and women's history.

Immigrant Women

This volume provides a range of perspectives on the concerns, the sources of problems, how issues might be addressed, and the future of immigrant women.

Author: Rita J. Simon

Publisher: Routledge

ISBN: 9781351320580

Category: Social Science

Page: 128

View: 877

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The obstacles to assimilation and treatment of immigrant women are major issues confronting the leading immigrant-receiving nations today-the United States, Canada, and Australia. This volume provides a range of perspectives on the concerns, the sources of problems, how issues might be addressed, and the future of immigrant women. It is based upon a two-part issue of the journal Gender Issues, and contains a new introduction by the editor. The first section focuses on labor force experiences of women who have immigrated to the United States and Australia from Mexico and Latin America, Eastern Europe, Korea, the Philippines, India and other parts of Asia. Nancy Foner assesses the complex and contradictory ways that migration changes women's status. Cynthia Crawford focuses on Mexican and Salvadoran women who have recently moved into janitorial work in Los Angeles. M.D.R. Evans and Tatjiana Lucik analyze labor force participation of immigrants in Australia and family strategies of women migrants from the former Yugoslavia against the experiences of woman migrants from the Mediterranean world and other parts of the Slavic world. Economist Harriet Duleep reviews what is known as the family investment model. Monica Boyd tackles the controversial issue of the leading immigrant-receiving nations' unwillingness to declare gender an explicit ground for persecution and thus for gaining -refugee status. The second section deals with social class and English language acquisition, the obstacles women have had to overcome in gaining refugee status in the United States and Canada, and a comparison of movement patterns between different commentaries in Mexico and the United States on the part of Mexican male and female immigrants. Contributors include Suzanne M. Sinke, Katharine Donato, and Nina Toren. Immigrant Women will be valuable to researchers in women's studies, population demographics, as well as those teaching courses in sociology, history, and immigration. Rita James Simon is university professor in the School of Public Affairs at the Washington College of Law at American University. She is editor of Gender Issues and author of The American Jury, The Insanity Defense: A Critical Assessment of Law and Policy in the Post-Hinckley Era (with David Aaronson), Adoption, Race, and Identity (with Howard Altstein), In the Golden Land: A Century of Russian and Soviet Jewish Immigration, Social Science Data and Supreme Court Decisions (with -Rosemary Erickson), and Abortion: Statutes, Policies, and Public Attitudes the World Over.

America s Immigrant Women

"It is this broad meaning of the term 'immigrant' that is being used in this book about one particular group of such newcomers -- women.

Author: Cecyle S. Neidle

Publisher: Boston : Twayne Publishers

ISBN: UVA:X000309907

Category: United States

Page: 312

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"It is this broad meaning of the term 'immigrant' that is being used in this book about one particular group of such newcomers -- women. Hence this book begins with the wives and daughters of the earliest immigrants -- the seventeenth and eighteenth century settlers -- proceeds to representatives of the early and late nineteenth century, and concludes with some twentieth century figures, many of whom are still living." -- Preface.

In Search of a Common Ground

Most studies of this life-altering experience have focused on its meaning and effects for men. Walking Common Ground reveals the surprising contrasts which show up in this story when the focus shifts to women.

Author: Kristine Leach

Publisher: Austin & Winfield Pub

ISBN: UVA:X004066518

Category: Social Science

Page: 80

View: 383

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"Over the years, millions of people from around the world left their homes in search of a better life in the United States of America. Most studies of this life-altering experience have focused on its meaning and effects for men. Walking Common Ground reveals the surprising contrasts which show up in this story when the focus shifts to women." "Comparing women's accounts of nineteenth century immigration taken from letters, diaries and autobiographies with extensive in-depths interviews of twentieth century women from every corner of the globe, Kristine Leach uncovers an unexpected commonality of experience for immigrant women, in spite of enormous differences in time, place and circumstance. Going beyond the recitation of immigration statistics, Leach explores the problems of child rearing in a culture with different standards of behavior, the adjustments to new freedoms and responsibilities and the orientation to new types of housing, food, customs and morals. She develops her account through the words and life of the women under study, placing her theoretical account in its concrete reality."--BOOK JACKET.Title Summary field provided by Blackwell North America, Inc. All Rights Reserved

The Irish Bridget

Now, in the first book-length treatment of the topic, Margaret Lynch-Brennan tells the real story of such Irish domestic servants, providing a richly detailed portrait of their lives and experiences.

Author: Margaret E Lynch-Brennan

Publisher: Syracuse University Press

ISBN: 9780815633549

Category: History

Page: 264

View: 442

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Many of the socially marginalized Irish immigrant women of this era made their living in domestic service. In contrast to immigrant men, who might have lived in a community with their fellow Irish, these women lived and worked in close contact with American families. Lynch-Brennan reveals the essential role this unique relationship played in shaping the place of the Irish in America today. Such women were instrumental in making the Irish presence more acceptable to earlier established American groups. At the same time, it was through the experience of domestic service that many Irish were acculturated, as these women absorbed the middle-class values of their patrons and passed them on to their own children. Drawing on personal correspondence and other primary sources, Lynch-Brennan gives voice to these young Irish women and celebrates their untold contribution to the ethnic history of the United States. In addition, recognizing the interest of scholars in contemporary domestic services, she devotes one chapter to comparing "Bridget's" experience to that of other ethnic women over time in domestic service in America.

Immigrant Women Tell Their Stories

This book provides an understanding of the journeys they traveled and the experiences they lived to bring you new insights into what it means to immigrate as a woman and to frame effective strategies for working with—and for—immigrant ...

Author: Roni Berger

Publisher: Routledge

ISBN: 9781317787815

Category: Political Science

Page: 284

View: 742

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“I felt like an alien who fell down to earth, not understanding the rules of the game, making all the possible mistakes, saying all the wrong things.” “Your whole life is in the hands of other people who do not always mean well and there is nothing you can do about it. They can decide to send you away and you have no control.” “The moment I enter the house, I shelve my American self and become the 'little obedient wife' that my husband wants me to be.” “The most difficult part is to find myself again. At the beginning I lost myself.” This jargon-free book documents and analyzes the experience of immigration from the female perspective. It discusses the unique challenges that women face, offers insights into the meanings of their experiences, develops gender-sensitive knowledge about immigration, and discusses implications for the effective development and provision of services to immigrant women. With fascinating case studies of immigration to the United States, Australia, and Israel as well as helpful lists of relevant organizations and Web site/Internet addresses, Immigrant Women Tell Their Stories is for everyone who wants to learn or teach about immigration, especially its female face. “It was like somebody sawed my heart in two. One part remained in Cuba and one part here.” Immigrant Women Tell Their Stories examines the nature of immigration for women through the eyes of those who have experienced it: how they perceive, interpret, and address the nature of the experience, its multiple aspects, the issues that it presents, and the strategies that immigrant women develop to cope with those issues. The women in this extraordinary book came from different spots around the globe, speak different languages and dialects, and their English comes in different accents. They vary in age as well as in cultural, ethnic, social, educational, and professional status. They represent a rainbow of family types and political opinions. In spite of their diversity, all these women share immigration experience. This book provides an understanding of the journeys they traveled and the experiences they lived to bring you new insights into what it means to immigrate as a woman and to frame effective strategies for working with—and for—immigrant women. “My father is the head of the house. When he decided to move to America [from India] my mother and us, the daughters, did not have much say. My mother and I were not happy at all, but it did not matter.” Immigrant Women Tell Their Stories provides you with historical and global perspectives on immigration and addresses: legal, political, economic, social, and psychological dimensions of immigration and its aftermath deconstructing immigration by age, gender, and circumstances major issues of immigrant women—language, mothering, relationships and marriage, finding employment, assimilation (how much and how soon), loneliness, and more resilience in immigrant women immigration from a lesbian perspective guidelines for the development and delivery of services to immigrant women “You may say that I am the bridge, the desert generation that lost the chance to have it my way. But I will do my best to raise my daughters to have more choices than I.” In this well-referenced book, immigrant women from Austria, Bosnia, Cuba, various parts of the former Soviet Union, Guatemala, India, Israel, Lebanon, Mexico, Pakistan, and the Philippines tell us their stories, recount what their experiences entailed and what challenges they posed, and teach us ways to help them cope successfully. “This was the best decision we could have made and the best thing we had ever done.”

Indian Immigrant Women and Work

This book investigates the work trajectories and related assimilation experiences of independent Indian women who have chosen their own migratory pathways in the United States.

Author: Ramya M. Vijaya

Publisher: Routledge

ISBN: 9781134990245

Category: Social Science

Page: 114

View: 904

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In recent years, interest in the large group of skilled immigrants coming from India to the United States has soared. However, this immigration is seen as being overwhelmingly male. Female migrants are depicted either as family migrants following in the path chosen by men, or as victims of desperation, forced into the migrant path due to economic exigencies. This book investigates the work trajectories and related assimilation experiences of independent Indian women who have chosen their own migratory pathways in the United States. The links between individual experiences and the macro trends of women, work, immigration and feminism are explored. The authors use historical records, previously unpublished gender disaggregate immigration data, and interviews with Indian women who have migrated to the US in every decade since the 1960s to demonstrate that independent migration among Indian women has a long and substantial history. Their status as skilled independent migrants can represent a relatively privileged and empowered choice. However, their working lives intersect with the gender constraints of labor markets in both India and the US. Vijaya and Biswas argue that their experiences of being relatively empowered, yet pushing against gender constraints in two different environments, can provide a unique perspective to the immigrant assimilation narrative and comparative gender dynamics in the global political economy. Casting light on a hidden, but steady, stream within the large group of skilled immigrants to the United States from India, this book will be of interest to researchers in the fields of political economy, anthropology, and sociology, including migration, race, class, ethnic and gender studies, as well as Asian studies.

Immigrant Women in the U S Workforce

This book represents a first effort to systematically describe the experience of immigrant women in the U.S. labor market over the past thirty years.

Author: Georges Vernez

Publisher: Lexington Books

ISBN: 0739100394

Category: Business & Economics

Page: 221

View: 858

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This book represents a first effort to systematically describe the experience of immigrant women in the U.S. labor market over the past thirty years. It may come as a surprise that the United States is currently home to more immigrant women than immigrant men. However, until this study was conducted, the attention of analysts and policymakers has focused solely on the labor performance of immigrant men. Georges Vernez's analysis of immigrant women's experience is the first to break this trend, revealing a complex story that resists easy interpretation. Some immigrant women succeed beyond all expectations, while others struggle all their lives and have little to show for it. In examining the myriad factors that contribute to the success and failure of immigrant women in the U.S. workforce, this book provides a profile of their changing origin and characteristics; describes what they do, where they work, and how they fare in the U.S. labor market; and looks at the use they make of public services to support themselves.

Foreign and Female

Immigrant women from various ethnic groups share their feelings about their homeland, men, families, work, and other major facets of their lives

Author: Doris Weatherford

Publisher: Schocken

ISBN: UVA:X001187876

Category: Juvenile Nonfiction

Page: 288

View: 250

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Immigrant women from various ethnic groups share their feelings about their homeland, men, families, work, and other major facets of their lives