Humor Entertainment and Popular Culture during World War I

This book looks at transnational war culture by examining seemingly light-hearted discourses on the Great War.

Author: Clémentine Tholas-Disset

Publisher: Springer

ISBN: 9781137436436

Category: Social Science

Page: 288

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Humor and entertainment were vital to the war effort during World War I. While entertainment provided relief to soldiers in the trenches, it also built up support for the war effort on the home front. This book looks at transnational war culture by examining seemingly light-hearted discourses on the Great War.

Humor Entertainment and Popular Culture during World War I

Humor and entertainment enable the artists to make over the naked truth of reality and rewrite the actual war to make ... humor, entertainment, and popular culture is an analysis of international cultural practices during the Great War.

Author: Clémentine Tholas-Disset

Publisher: Springer

ISBN: 9781137436436

Category: Social Science

Page: 288

View: 200

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Humor and entertainment were vital to the war effort during World War I. While entertainment provided relief to soldiers in the trenches, it also built up support for the war effort on the home front. This book looks at transnational war culture by examining seemingly light-hearted discourses on the Great War.

The American Girl Goes to War

“Hoaxes, Ballyhoo Stunts, War, and Other Jokes: Humor in the American Marketing of Hollywood War Films during the Great War.” In Humor, Entertainment, and Popular Culture during World War I. Edited by Clémentine Tholas-Disset and Karen ...

Author: Liz Clarke

Publisher: Rutgers University Press

ISBN: 9781978810174

Category: Performing Arts

Page: 174

View: 340

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During the 1910s, films about war often featured a female protagonist. The films portrayed women as spies, cross-dressing soldiers, and athletic defenders of their homes—roles typically reserved for men and that contradicted gendered-expectations of home-front women waiting for their husbands, sons, and brothers to return from battle. The representation of American martial spirit—particularly in the form of heroines—has a rich history in film in the years just prior to the American entry into World War I. The American Girl Goes to War demonstrates the predominance of heroic female characters in in early narrative films about war from 1908 to 1919. American Girls were filled with the military spirit of their forefathers and became one of the major ways that American women’s changing political involvement, independence, and active natures were contained by and subsumed into pre-existing American ideologies.

French Cinema and the Great War

The little-known fact that humor played a major role in popular culture during WWI is investigated in Clémentine Tholas-Disset and Karen A. Ritzenhoff, eds., Humor, Entertainment, and Popular Culture during WWI (New York: Palgrave ...

Author: Marcelline Block

Publisher: Rowman & Littlefield

ISBN: 9781442260986

Category: Performing Arts

Page: 204

View: 957

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Even a century after its conclusion, the devastation of the Great War still echoes in the work of artists who try to make sense of the political, moral, ideological, and economic changes and challenges it spawned. This volume provides the first book-length study of World War I as it is featured in French cinema, from the silent era to contemporary films. Presented in three thematic sections—Recording and Remembering the Great War, Women at the Front, and Interrogating Commemoration—the essays in this volume explore the ways in which French film contributes to the restoration and modification of memories of the war. Films such as La Grande Illusion,King of Hearts, A Very Long Engagement, and Joyeux Noel are among those discussed in the volume’s examination of the various ways in which film mediates personal and collective memories of this critical historical event.

Popular Song in the First World War

Amy Wells, 'Sugary Celebration and Culinary Activism: Sugar, Cooking and Entertaining during World War I', in C. Tholas-Disset and K. A. Ritzenhoff (eds), Humor, Entertainment and Popular Culture during World War I (New York, ...

Author: John Mullen

Publisher: Routledge

ISBN: 9781351068666

Category: Music

Page: 260

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What did popular song mean to people across the world during the First World War? For the first time, song repertoires and musical industries from countries on both sides in the Great War as well as from neutral countries are analysed in one exciting volume. Experts from around the world, and with very different approaches, bring to life the entertainment of a century ago, to show the role it played in the lives of our ancestors. The reader will meet the penniless lyricist, the theatre chain owner, the cross-dressing singer, fado composer, stage Scotsman or rhyming soldier, whether they come from Serbia, Britain, the USA, Germany, France, Portugal or elsewhere, in this fascinating exploration of showbiz before the generalization of the gramophone. Singing was a vector for patriotic support for the war, and sometimes for anti-war activism, but it was much more than that, and expressed and constructed debates, anxieties, social identities and changes in gender roles. This work, accompanied by many links to online recordings, will allow the reader to glimpse the complex role of popular song in people’s lives in a period of total war.

Creative Resistance

Political Humor in the Arab Uprisings Sabine Damir-Geilsdorf, Stephan Milich. Souriatnapress (2015): “Mulhaqq shahri karikaturi sakhir: ... Humor, Entertainment, and Popular Culture during World War I, New York: Palgrave Macmillan, pp.

Author: Sabine Damir-Geilsdorf

Publisher: transcript Verlag

ISBN: 9783839440698

Category: Social Science

Page: 332

View: 554

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During the uprisings of the Arab Spring between 2010 and 2012, oppositional movements used political humor to criticize political leaders or to expose the absurdities of the socio-political conditions. These humorous expressions in various art forms such as poetry, stand-up comedy, street art, music, caricatures, cartoons, comics and puppet shows were further distributed in the social media. This first comprehensive study of political humor in the uprisings explores the varieties and functions of political humor as a creative tool for resistance. It analyzes humorous forms of cultural expression and their impact on socio-political developments in different countries of the Middle East and North Africa with a special focus on the changing modes of humor.

The Apocalypse in Film

Pierre Sorlin, “Cinema and the Memory of the Great War,” in The First World War and Popular Cinema: 1914 to the Present, ed. ... eds., Humor, Entertainment, and Popular Culture during WWI (New York: Palgrave Macmillan, 2015).

Author: Karen A. Ritzenhoff

Publisher: Rowman & Littlefield

ISBN: 9781442260290

Category: Performing Arts

Page: 254

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We live in a world at risk. Dire predictions about our future or the demise of planet earth persist. Even fictional representations depict narratives of decay and the end of a commonly shared social reality. Along with recurring Hollywood blockbusters that imagine the end of the world, there has been a new wave of zombie features as well as independent films that offer various visions of the future. The Apocalypse in Film: Dystopias, Disasters, and Other Visions about the End of the World offers an overview of Armageddon in film from the silent era to the present. This collection of essays discusses how such films reflect social anxieties—ones that are linked to economic, ecological, and cultural factors. Featuring a broad spectrum of international scholars specializing in different historical genres and methodologies, these essays look at a number of films, including the silent classic The Four Horsemen of the Apocalypse, the black comedy Dr. Strangelove or: How I Learned to Stop Worrying and Love the Bomb, the Mayan calendar disaster epic, 2012, and in particular, Lars Von Trier’s Melancholia, the focus of several essays. As some filmmakers translate the anxiety about a changing global climate and geo-political relations into visions of the apocalypse, others articulate worries about the planet’s future by depicting chemical warfare, environmental disasters, or human made destruction. This book analyzes the emergence of apocalyptic and dystopic narratives and explores the political and social situations on which these films are based. Contributing to the dialogue on dystopic culture in war and peace, The Apocalypse in Film will be of interest to scholars in film and media studies, border studies, gender studies, sociology, and political science.

Rooted

29 Clémentine Tholas-Disset and Karen A Ritzenhoff, 'Introduction: Humour, Entertainment, and Popular Culture During World War I', in Tholas-Disset and Ritzenhoff (eds), Humor, Entertainment, and Popular Culture During World War I (New ...

Author: Amanda Laugesen

Publisher: NewSouth Publishing

ISBN: 9781742245089

Category: Language Arts & Disciplines

Page:

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Bugger, rooted, bloody oath... What is it about Australians and swearing? We've got an international reputation for using bad language (Where the bloody hell are ya?) and letting rip with a choice swear word or two has long been a very Aussie thing to do. From the defiant curses of the convicts and bullock drivers to the humour of Kath and Kim, Amanda Laugesen, director of the Australian National Dictionary Centre, takes us on a fascinating journey through the history of Australia's bad language to reveal our preoccupations and our concerns. Bad language has been used in all sort of ways in our history: to defy authority, as a form of liberation and subversion, and as a source of humour and creativity. Bad language has also been used to oppress and punish those who have been denied a claim to using it, notably Indigenous Australians and women. It has also long been subject to various forms of censorship. 'If you've ever wondered why to use bad language in Australia is to 'swear like a bullocky', Amanda Laugesen's Rooted will give you the answer. Taking us on a colourful tour of more than two centuries of bad language that extends from the mildly offensive to the completely filthy, Laugesen tells the story of Australia through those words and phrases that have often been seen as unfit to print. This is an engrossing social history – a bloody beauty – from one of our leading experts on Australian English.' — Frank Bongiorno, Professor of History, The Australian National University

Caricature and National Character

The United States at War Christopher J. Gilbert ... At War with Metaphor: Media, Propaganda, and Racism in the War on Terror. ... Humor, Entertainment, and Popular Culture During World War I. New York: Palgrave Macmillan, ...

Author: Christopher J. Gilbert

Publisher: Penn State Press

ISBN: 9780271089904

Category: Literary Criticism

Page: 262

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According to the popular maxim, a nation at war reveals its true character. In this incisive work, Chris Gilbert examines the long history of US war politics through the lens of political cartoons to provide new, unique insights into American cultural identity. Tracing the comic representation of American values from the First World War to the War on Terror, Gilbert explores the power of humor in caricature to expose both the folly in jingoistic virtues and the sometimes-strange fortune in nationalistic vices. He examines the artwork of four exemplary American cartoonists—James Montgomery Flagg, Dr. Seuss, Ollie Harrington, and Ann Telnaes—to craft a trenchant image of Americanism. These examinations animate the rhetorical, and indeed comic, force of icons like Uncle Sam, national symbols like the American Eagle, political stooges like President Donald J. Trump, and more, as well as the power of political cartoons to comment on issues of race, class, and gender on the home front. Throughout, Gilbert portrays a US culture rooted in and riven by ideas of manifest destiny, patriotism, and democracy for all, yet plagued by ugly forms of nationalism, misogyny, racism, and violence. Rich with examples of hilarious and masterfully drawn caricatures from a diverse range of creators, this unflinching look at the evolution of our conflicted national character illustrates how American cartoonists use farce, mockery, and wit to put national character in the comic looking glass.

Bodies Love and Faith in the First World War

“Nature and Functions of Humor in Trench Newspapers (1914–1918),” in Clementine Tholas-Disset and Karen A. ritzenhoff, eds., Humor, Entertainment, and Popular Culture During World War I (Basingstoke: Palgrave Macmillan, 2015), ...

Author: Nancy Christie

Publisher: Springer

ISBN: 9783319728353

Category: History

Page: 319

View: 320

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This book explores the courtship and marriage of Gwyneth Murray, an English woman, and a Canadian, Harry Logan, who wrote in the personae of their vagina (Dardanella) and penis (Peter) during World War I. Through an analysis of their extensive daily correspondence over nearly a decade, it uncovers the couple’s changing attitudes to the intersection of sexuality and religion, to marriage and childrearing, as they navigated the transition from Victorian to modern values. By focusing on first-person narratives, this book enriches our understanding of gender identities revealing how porous the boundaries remained between notions of 'heterosexual' and 'same-sex' friendships. This study offers an unprecedented perspective on one couple’s sexual practices, which included mutual masturbation and oral sex, and constitutes one of the most intensive examinations of female attitudes to sexual pleasure in an era of female emancipation.