How I Stopped Being a Jew

The State of Israel defines me as a Jew , not because I express myself in a Jewish language , hum Jewish songs , eat Jewish food ... according to Israeli law just as according to Judaic law ( Halakhah ) , I cannot stop being a Jew .

Author: Shlomo Sand

Publisher: Verso Books

ISBN: 9781781686140

Category: Biography & Autobiography

Page: 112

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Shlomo Sand was born in 1946, in a displaced person’s camp in Austria, to Jewish parents; the family later migrated to Palestine. As a young man, Sand came to question his Jewish identity, even that of a “secular Jew.” With this meditative and thoughtful mixture of essay and personal recollection, he articulates the problems at the center of modern Jewish identity. How I Stopped Being a Jew discusses the negative effects of the Israeli exploitation of the “chosen people” myth and its “holocaust industry.” Sand criticizes the fact that, in the current context, what “Jewish” means is, above all, not being Arab and reflects on the possibility of a secular, non-exclusive Israeli identity, beyond the legends of Zionism.

How I Stopped Being a Jew

How I Stopped Being a Jew discusses the negative effects of the Israeli exploitation of the “chosen people” myth and its “holocaust industry.” Sand criticizes the fact that, in the current context, what “Jewish” means is, above ...

Author: Shlomo Sand

Publisher: Verso Books

ISBN: 9781781686157

Category: Biography & Autobiography

Page: 128

View: 205

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Shlomo Sand was born in 1946, in a displaced person’s camp in Austria, to Jewish parents; the family later migrated to Palestine. As a young man, Sand came to question his Jewish identity, even that of a “secular Jew.” With this meditative and thoughtful mixture of essay and personal recollection, he articulates the problems at the center of modern Jewish identity. How I Stopped Being a Jew discusses the negative effects of the Israeli exploitation of the “chosen people” myth and its “holocaust industry.” Sand criticizes the fact that, in the current context, what “Jewish” means is, above all, not being Arab and reflects on the possibility of a secular, non-exclusive Israeli identity, beyond the legends of Zionism.

The Imaginary Jew

And then, with help from a Marxism in crisis, the Jews rediscovered their right to a history and stopped being occulted, even condemned, by a symbol that was their own. The turnabout was spectacular, but it wasn't enough to put a dent ...

Author: Alain Finkielkraut

Publisher:

ISBN: UOM:39015032424437

Category: History

Page: 201

View: 637

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The Holocaust changed what it means to be a Jew, for Jew and non-Jew alike. Much of the discussion about the new meaning has been done by French writers of the left, but their work is a storm of contradictions. In The Imaginary Jew, Alain Finkielkraut describes with passion and acuity his own passage through that storm.

Jews Out of the Question

The solution to the Jewish Question is the dissolution of the Jewish Question, which means the disappearance of the Jews. Emancipation, the emergence of the modern state, means that the Jews “may stop being Jews” and—here the deep ...

Author: Elad Lapidot

Publisher: SUNY Press

ISBN: 9781438480466

Category: Philosophy

Page: 340

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A provocative study of opposition to anti-Semitism in contemporary political philosophy. In post-Holocaust philosophy, anti-Semitism has come to be seen as a paradigmatic political and ideological evil. Jews Out of the Question examines the role that opposition to anti-Semitism has played in shaping contemporary political philosophy. Elad Lapidot argues that post-Holocaust philosophy identifies the fundamental, epistemological evil of anti-Semitic thought not in thinking against Jews, but in thinking of Jews. In other words, what philosophy denounces as anti-Semitic is the figure of “the Jew” in thought. Lapidot reveals how, paradoxically, opposition to anti-Semitism has generated a rejection of Jewish thought in post-Holocaust philosophy. Through critical readings of political philosophers such as Adorno, Horkheimer, Sartre, Arendt, Badiou, and Nancy, the book contends that by rejecting Jewish thought, the opposition to anti-Semitism comes dangerously close to anti-Semitism itself, and at work in this rejection, is a problematic understanding of the relations between politics and thought—a troubling political epistemology. Lapidot’s critique of this political epistemology is the book’s ultimate aim. Elad Lapidot is Assistant Professor of Philosophy at the University of Bern in Switzerland. He is coeditor (with Micha Brumlik) of Heidegger and Jewish Thought: Difficult Others.

Hybrid Hate

Judt concluded that racially these Jews have stopped being Jews. They could not be considered Jews as their pigmentation was black; all that could be said was that they practiced the Jewish religion.

Author: Tudor Parfitt

Publisher: Oxford University Press

ISBN: 9780190083342

Category: History

Page: 304

View: 545

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Hybrid Hate is the first book to study the conflation of antisemitism and anti-Black racism. As objects of racism, Jews and Blacks have been linked together for centuries as peoples apart from the general run of humanity. In this book, Tudor Parfitt investigates the development of antisemitism, anti-Black racism, and race theory in the West from the Renaissance to the Second World War. Parfitt explains how Jews were often perceived as Black in medieval Europe, and the conflation of Jews and Blacks continued throughout the period of the Enlightenment. With the discovery of a community of Black Jews in Loango in West Africa in 1777, and later of Black Jews in India, the Middle East, and other parts of Africa, the notion of multiracial Jews was born. Over the following centuries, the figure of the hybrid Black Jew was drawn into the maelstrom of evolving theories about race hierarchies and taxonomies. Parfitt analyses how Jews and Blacks were increasingly conflated in a racist discourse from the mid-nineteenth century to the period of the Third Reich, as the two fundamental prejudices of the West were combined. Hybrid Hate offers a new interpretation of the rise of antisemitism and anti-Black racism in Europe, and casts light on contemporary racist discourses in the United States and Europe.

Never Alone

Strong Diaspora Jewish communities stopped being threats to the aliyah tallies in the short-term, becoming long-term investments in future advocates and immigrants. Some went so far as to suggest dropping the term “Diaspora,” just as ...

Author: Natan Sharansky

Publisher: Hachette UK

ISBN: 9781541742437

Category: Biography & Autobiography

Page: 480

View: 876

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A classic account of courage, integrity, and most of all, belonging In 1977, Natan Sharansky, a leading activist in the democratic dissident movement in the Soviet Union and the movement for free Jewish emigration, was arrested by the KGB. He spent nine years as a political prisoner, convicted of treason against the state. Every day, Sharansky fought for individual freedom in the face of overt tyranny, a struggle that would come to define the rest of his life. Never Alone reveals how Sharansky's years in prison, many spent in harsh solitary confinement, prepared him for a very public life after his release. As an Israeli politician and the head of the Jewish Agency, Sharansky brought extraordinary moral clarity and uncompromising, often uncomfortable, honesty. His story is suffused with reflections from his time as a political prisoner, from his seat at the table as history unfolded in Israel and the Middle East, and from his passionate efforts to unite the Jewish people. Written with frankness, affection, and humor, the book offers us profound insights from a man who embraced the essential human struggle: to find his own voice, his own faith, and the people to whom he could belong.

Jewish Spectator

These youths have properly drawn from Judaism the realization that being a Jew means to be concerned about both the ... Fortunately or unfortunately , Judaism is a burden which no Jew can escape or avoid — the burden of expectation ...

Author:

Publisher:

ISBN: STANFORD:36105005602946

Category: Jews

Page:

View: 232

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Paul Philosophy and the Theopolitical Vision

The true transforms differences from being the basis of competition and struggle to being adiaphora, ... it would not be very satisfactory if all israel is saved precisely to the extent her members stop being Jewish, or treat their ...

Author: Douglas Harink

Publisher: Wipf and Stock Publishers

ISBN: 9781606086629

Category: Religion

Page: 350

View: 994

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The apostle Paul was a man of many journeys. We are usually familiar with the geographical ones he made in his own time. This volume traces others--Paul's journeys in our time, as he is co-opted or invited to travel (sometimes as abused slave, sometimes as trusted guide) with modern and recent Continental philosophers and political theorists. Kierkegaard, Nietzsche, Heidegger, and Benjamin; Taubes, Badiou, Zizek, and Agamben--Paul journeys here among the philosophers. In these essays you are invited to travel with them into the regions of philosophy, hermeneutics, political theory, and theology. You will certainly hear the philosophers speak. But Paul will not remain silent. Above the sounds of the journey his voice comes through, loud and clear.

The Zionist Ideas

The Orthodox Jewish feminist writer Blu Greenberg, for one, identified Israel as being of “cosmic significance” to ... and Judaism that Jewish women must stop being “inside persons,” parallels the Zionist mission to be Jews comfortably ...

Author: Gil Troy

Publisher: U of Nebraska Press

ISBN: 9780827614253

Category: History

Page: 608

View: 640

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The most comprehensive Zionist collection ever published, The Zionist Ideas: Visions for the Jewish Homeland—Then, Now, Tomorrow sheds light on the surprisingly diverse and shared visions for realizing Israel as a democratic Jewish state. Building on Arthur Hertzberg’s classic, The Zionist Idea, Gil Troy explores the backstories, dreams, and legacies of more than 170 passionate Jewish visionaries—quadruple Hertzberg’s original number and now including women, mizrachim, and others—from the 1800s to today. Troy divides the thinkers into six Zionist schools of thought—Political, Revisionist, Labor, Religious, Cultural, and Diaspora Zionism—and reveals the breadth of the debate and surprising syntheses. He also presents the visionaries within three major stages of Zionist development, demonstrating the length and evolution of the conversation. Part 1 (pre-1948) introduces the pioneers who founded the Jewish state, such as Herzl, Gordon, Jabotinsky, Kook, Ha’am, and Szold. Part 2 (1948 to 2000) features builders who actualized and modernized the Zionist blueprints, such as Ben-Gurion, Berlin, Meir, Begin, Soloveitchik, Uris, and Kaplan. Part 3 showcases today’s torchbearers, including Barak, Grossman, Shaked, Lau, Yehoshua, and Sacks. This mosaic of voices will engage equally diverse readers in reinvigorating the Zionist conversation—weighing and developing the moral, social, and political character of the Jewish state of today and tomorrow.