Hope Joy and Affection in the Classical World

This collection aims to redress the balance with eleven studies of emotions like hope, joy, good will and mercy that show some of the complexity these emotions play in ancient literature and thought"--Provided by publisher.

Author: Ruth Rothaus Caston

Publisher: Oxford University Press

ISBN: 9780190278298

Category: Classical literature

Page: 296

View: 439

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"For all the interest in emotions in antiquity, there has been little study of positive emotions. This collection aims to redress the balance with eleven studies of emotions like hope, joy, good will and mercy that show some of the complexity these emotions play in ancient literature and thought"--Provided by publisher.

Hope Joy and Affection in the Classical World

The chapters in this collection show that there are representations of positive emotions - considered here under the headings of 'hope', 'joy', and 'affection' - extending from archaic Greek poetry, through the philosophical schools of the ...

Author: Ruth Rothaus Caston

Publisher:

ISBN: 019060378X

Category: LITERARY CRITICISM

Page:

View: 943

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Scholarship on the emotions in classical antiquity has focused almost entirely on negative emotions, but that is not because the Greeks and Romans had little to say about positive emotions. The chapters in this collection show that there are representations of positive emotions - considered here under the headings of 'hope', 'joy', and 'affection' - extending from archaic Greek poetry, through the philosophical schools of the Epicureans and Stoics, to the Christianity of Augustine, and while many of the literary representations give expression to positive emotion but also describe its loss, the philosophers offer a more optimistic assessment of the possibilities of attaining joy or contentment in this life.

Hope Joy and Affection in the Classical World

The Elegiac Passion Jealousy in Roman Love Elegy Ruth Rothaus Caston Envy and Jealousy in Classical Athens A Socio-Psychological Approach Ed Sanders Hope, Joy, and Affection in the Classical World Edited by Ruth R. Caston and Robert A.

Author: Ruth R. Caston

Publisher: Oxford University Press

ISBN: 9780190278304

Category: Philosophy

Page: 288

View: 694

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The emotions have long been an interest for those studying ancient Greece and Rome. But while the last few decades have produced excellent studies of individual emotions and the different approaches to them by the major philosophical schools, the focus has been almost entirely on negative emotions. This might give the impression that the Greeks and Romans had little to say about positive emotion, something that would be misguided. As the chapters in this collection indicate, there are representations of positive emotions extending from archaic Greek poetry to Augustine, and in both philosophical works and literary genres as wide-ranging as lyric poetry, forensic oratory, comedy, didactic poetry, and the novel. Nor is the evidence uniform: while many of the literary representations give expression to positive emotion but also describe its loss, the philosophers offer a more optimistic assessment of the possibilities of attaining joy or contentment in this life. The positive emotions show some of the same features that all emotions do. But unlike the negative emotions, which we are able to describe and analyze in great detail because of our preoccupation with them, positive emotions tend to be harder to articulate. Hence the interest of the present study, which considers how positive emotions are described, their relationship to other emotions, the ways in which they are provoked or upset by circumstances, how they complicate and enrich our relationships with other people, and which kinds of positive emotion we should seek to integrate. The ancient works have a great deal to say about all of these topics, and for that reason deserve more study, both for our understanding of antiquity and for our understanding of the positive emotions in general.

Eschatology in Antiquity

'Metaphors for Hope in Archaic and Classical Greek Poetry', in Caston, R. R. and Kaster, R.A. (eds.), Hope, Joy, and Affection in the Classical World. Oxford: Oxford University Press, 13–44. Caston, R. R. and Kaster, R. A. (eds.).

Author: Hilary Marlow

Publisher: Routledge

ISBN: 9781315459493

Category: History

Page: 654

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This collection of essays explores the rhetoric and practices surrounding views on life after death and the end of the world, including the fate of the individual, apocalyptic speculation and hope for cosmological renewal, in a wide range of societies from Ancient Mesopotamia to the Byzantine era. The 42 essays by leading scholars in each field explore the rich spectrum of ways in which eschatological understanding can be expressed, and for which purposes it can be used. Readers will gain new insight into the historical contexts, details, functions and impact of eschatological ideas and imagery in ancient texts and material culture from the twenty-fifth century BCE to the ninth century CE. Traditionally, the study of “eschatology” (and related concepts) has been pursued mainly by scholars of Jewish and Christian scripture. By broadening the disciplinary scope but remaining within the clearly defined geographical milieu of the Mediterranean, this volume enables its readers to note comparisons and contrasts, as well as exchanges of thought and transmission of eschatological ideas across Antiquity. Cross-referencing, high quality illustrations and extensive indexing contribute to a rich resource on a topic of contemporary interest and relevance. Eschatology in Antiquity is aimed at readers from a wide range of academic disciplines, as well as non-specialists including seminary students and religious leaders. The primary audience will comprise researchers in relevant fields including Biblical Studies, Classics and Ancient History, Ancient Philosophy, Ancient Near Eastern Studies, Art History, Late Antiquity, Byzantine Studies and Cultural Studies. Care has been taken to ensure that the essays are accessible to undergraduates and those without specialist knowledge of particular subject areas.

Hope in Ancient Literature History and Art

Cairns, D. 2016 “Metaphors for Hope in Archaic and Classical Greek Poetry,” in: R.R. Caston/R.A. Kaster (eds.), Hope, Joy, and Affection in the Classical World, Oxford/New York, 13–44. Connor, W.R. 1984. Thucydides, Princeton.

Author: George Kazantzidis

Publisher: Walter de Gruyter GmbH & Co KG

ISBN: 9783110597103

Category: History

Page: 407

View: 431

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Although ancient hope has attracted much scholarly attention in the past, this is the first book-length discussion of the topic. The introduction offers a systematic discussion of the semantics of Greek elpis and Latin spes and addresses the difficult question of whether hope -ancient and modern- is an emotion. On the other hand, the 16 contributions deal with specific aspects of hope in Greek and Latin literature, history and art, including Pindar's poetry, Greek tragedy, Thucydides, Virgil's epic and Tacitus' Historiae. The volume also explores from a historical perspective the hopes of slaves in antiquity, the importance of hope for the enhancement of stereotypes about the barbarians, and the depiction of hope in visual culture, providing thereby a useful tool not only for classicist but also for philosophers, cultural historians and political scientists.

Historical and Multidisciplinary Perspectives on Hope

In R. R. Caston & R. A. Kaster (Eds.), Hope, joy, and affection in the classical world (pp. 13–44). Oxford University Press. https://doi.org/10.1093/acprof:oso/9780190278298.003.0002 Cairns, D. (2020). Hope in archaic and classical ...

Author: Steven C. van den Heuvel

Publisher: Springer Nature

ISBN: 9783030464899

Category: Psychology

Page: 261

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This open access volume makes an important contribution to the ongoing research on hope theory by combining insights from both its long history and its increasing multi-disciplinarity. In the first part, it recognizes the importance of the centuries-old reflection on hope by offering historical perspectives and tracing it back to ancient Greek philosophy. At the same time, it provides novel perspectives on often-overlooked historical theories and developments and challenges established views. The second part of the volume documents the state of the art of current research in hope across eight disciplines, which are philosophy, theology, psychology, economy, sociology, health studies, ecology, and development studies. Taken together, this volume provides an integrated view on hope as a multi-faced phenomenon. It contributes to the further understanding of hope as an essential human capacity, with the possibility of transforming our human societies.

Children in Greek Tragedy

Metaphors for Hope in Archaic and Classical Greek Poetry', in R. Caston and R. Kaster, eds., Hope, Joy, and Affection in the Classical World, 13–44. Oxford. Cantarella, E. 2003. 'Fathers and sons in Rome', Classical World 96, no.

Author: Emma M. Griffiths

Publisher: Oxford University Press

ISBN: 9780192560568

Category: Literary Criticism

Page: 368

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Astyanax is thrown from the walls of Troy; Medeia kills her children as an act of vengeance against her husband; Aias reflects with sorrow on his son's inheritance, yet kills himself and leaves Eurysakes vulnerable to his enemies. The pathos created by threats to children is a notable feature of Greek tragedy, but does not in itself explain the broad range of situations in which the ancient playwrights chose to employ such threats. Rather than casting children in tragedy as simple figures of pathos, this volume proposes a new paradigm to understand their roles, emphasizing their dangerous potential as the future adults of myth. Although they are largely silent, passive figures on stage, children exert a dramatic force that transcends their limited physical presence, and are in fact theatrically complex creations who pose a danger to the major characters. Their multiple projected lives create dramatic palimpsests which are paradoxically more significant than their immediate emotional effects: children are never killed because of their immediate weakness, but because of their potential strength. This re-evaluation of the significance of child characters in Greek tragedy draws on a fresh examination of the evidence for child actors in fifth-century Athens, which concludes that the physical presence of children was a significant factor in their presentation. However, child roles can only be fully appreciated as theatrical phenomena, utilizing the inherent ambiguities of drama: as such, case studies of particular plays and playwrights are underpinned by detailed analysis of staging considerations, opening up new avenues for interpretation and challenging traditional models of children in tragedy.

The Routledge Handbook of Classics and Cognitive Theory

“Look Both Ways: Studying Emotion in Ancient Greek.” Critical Quarterly 50(4), 43–62. Cairns, D.L. 2015. ... In Hope, Joy, and Affection in the Classical World, R. Caston and R. Kaster (eds.). Oxford: Oxford University Press, 13–44.

Author: Peter Meineck

Publisher: Routledge

ISBN: 9781317429982

Category: History

Page: 414

View: 641

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The Routledge Handbook of Classics and Cognitive Theory is an interdisciplinary volume that examines the application of cognitive theory to the study of the classical world, across several interrelated areas including linguistics, literary theory, social practices, performance, artificial intelligence and archaeology. With contributions from a diverse group of international scholars working in this exciting new area, the volume explores the processes of the mind drawing from research in psychology, philosophy, neuroscience, and anthropology, and interrogates the implications of these new approaches for the study of the ancient world. Topics covered in this wide-ranging collection include: cognitive linguistics applied to Homeric and early Greek texts, Roman cultural semantics, linguistic embodiment in Latin literature, group identities in Greek lyric, cognitive dissonance in historiography, kinesthetic empathy in Sappho, artificial intelligence in Hesiod and Greek drama, the enactivism of Roman statues and memory and art in the Roman Empire. This ground-breaking work is the first to organize the field, allowing both scholars and students access to the methodologies, bibliographies and techniques of the cognitive sciences and how they have been applied to classics.

Yearbook of the Maimonides Centre for Advanced Studies 2019

“'Torn between Hope and Despair': Narrative Foreshadowing and Suspense in the Greek Novel.” In Hope, Joy, and Affection in the Classical World, edited by Ruth R. Caston and Robert A. Kaster, 75–91. New York: Oxford University Press, ...

Author: Yoav Meyrav

Publisher: Walter de Gruyter GmbH & Co KG

ISBN: 9783110618839

Category: Religion

Page: 318

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The Yearbook of the Maimonides Centre for Advanced Studies mirrors the annual activities of staff and visiting fellows of the Centre as well as scholars of the Institute for Jewish Philosophy and Religion at the University of Hamburg and reports on symposia, workshops, and lectures. Although aimed at a wider audience, the yearbook also contains academic articles and book reviews on scepticism in Judaism and scepticism in general. The Yearbook 2016 was published as volume 1 in the series Jewish Thought, Philosophy, and Religion. From 2017 onwards, the Yearbook is published as a separate series. Further book series of the Maimonides Centre for Advanced Studies are Studies and Texts in Scepticism and Jewish Thought, Philosophy, and Religion.

Paul s Emotional Regime

In Hope , Joy , and Affection in the Classical World , edited by Ruth R. Caston and Robert A. Kaster , 143-60 . Oxford : Oxford University Press , 2016 . Gnilka , Joachim . Der Philipperbrief . Herders theologischer Kommentar zum Neuen ...

Author: Ian Y. S. Jew

Publisher: Bloomsbury Publishing

ISBN: 9780567694133

Category: Religion

Page: 224

View: 557

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In his letters Paul speaks often of his emotions, and also promotes certain feelings while banishing others. This indicates that for Paul, emotion is vital. However, in New Testament studies, the study of emotions is still nascent; current research in the social sciences highlights its cognitive and social dimensions. Ian Y. S. Jew combines rigorous social-scientific analysis and exegetical enquiry to argue that emotions are intrinsic to the formation of the Pauline communities, as they encode belief structures and influence patterns of social experience. By taking joy in Philippians and grief in 1 Thessalonians as representative emotions, and contrasting Paul's approach with that of his Stoic contemporaries, Jew demonstrates that authorized feelings have socially integrating and differentiating functions; by reinforcing the shared theological realities upon which emotional norms are based, group belonging is bolstered. Simultaneously, authorized emotions fortify the theological boundaries between Christians and others, which strengthens group solidarity in the Church by accentuating its members' insider status. Using this framework heuristically, Jew explores how the interplay of symbolic, ritual, and social elements within Paul's eschatological worldview reinforces emotional norms, and demonstrates that attention to emotion can only deepen our understanding of the social formation of the early believers.