Genealogies of Music and Memory

... alone left genuinely artistic memories of this beautiful musical and conjugal elegy entitled Orphée, by the illustrious Gluck'.36 Caroline Branchu, who had been praised so lavishly by Berlioz, had a different status.

Author: Mark Everist

Publisher: Oxford University Press

ISBN: 9780197546017

Category: Music

Page:

View: 948

DOWNLOAD →

The history of music is most often written as a sequence of composers and works. But a richer understanding of the music of the past may be obtained by also considering the afterlives of a composer's works. Genealogies of Music and Memory asks how the stage works of Christoph Willibald Gluck (1714-87) were cultivated in nineteenth-century Paris, and concludes that although the composer was not represented formally on the stage until 1859, his music was known from a wide range of musical and literary environments. Received opinion has Hector Berlioz as the sole guardian of the Gluckian flame from the 1820s onwards, and responsible -- together with the soprano Pauline Viardot -- for the 'revival' of the composer's Orfeo in 1859. The picture is much clarified by looking at the concert performances of Gluck during the first two thirds of the nineteenth century, and the ways in which they were received and the literary discourses they engendered. Coupled to questions of music publication, pedagogy, and the institutional status of the composer, such a study reveals a wide range of individual agents active in the promotion of Gluck's music for the Parisian stage. The 'revival' of Orfeo is contextualised among other attempts at reviving Gluck's works in the 1860s, and the role of Berlioz, Viardot and a host of others re-examined.

Genealogies of Music and Memory

Genealogies of Music and Memory asks how the stage works of Christoph Willibald Gluck (1714-87) were cultivated in nineteenth-century Paris, and concludes that although the composer was not represented formally on the stage until 1859, his ...

Author: Mark Everist

Publisher: Oxford University Press, USA

ISBN: 9780197546000

Category: Biography & Autobiography

Page: 229

View: 541

DOWNLOAD →

The history of music is most often written as a sequence of composers and works. But a richer understanding of the music of the past may be obtained by also considering the afterlives of a composer's works. Genealogies of Music and Memory asks how the stage works of Christoph Willibald Gluck (1714-87) were cultivated in nineteenth-century Paris, and concludes that although the composer was not represented formally on the stage until 1859, his music was known from a wide range of musical and literary environments. Received opinion has Hector Berlioz as the sole guardian of the Gluckian flame from the 1820s onwards, and responsible -- together with the soprano Pauline Viardot -- for the 'revival' of the composer's Orfeo in 1859. The picture is much clarified by looking at the concert performances of Gluck during the first two thirds of the nineteenth century, and the ways in which they were received and the literary discourses they engendered. Coupled to questions of music publication, pedagogy, and the institutional status of the composer, such a study reveals a wide range of individual agents active in the promotion of Gluck's music for the Parisian stage. The 'revival' of Orfeo is contextualised among other attempts at reviving Gluck's works in the 1860s, and the role of Berlioz, Viardot and a host of others re-examined.

The Empire at the Op ra

... of the work as a reinscription of Napoléon Bonaparteʼs imperial victories, see Mark Everist, Genealogies of Musical Memory: Gluck in the Nineteenth-Century Parisian Imagination (New York: Oxford University Press, 2021), 106–18.

Author: Mark Everist

Publisher: Cambridge University Press

ISBN: 9781108904728

Category: Music

Page:

View: 557

DOWNLOAD →

Although nineteenth-century legislation had tried to ensure a precise separation between genre and institution for Parisian music in the theatre, it had inadvertently laid out a field on which the politics of genre could be played out as agents and actors of all types deployed various forms of artistic power. During the Second Empire, from 1854 until 1870, the state took over day-to-day control of the Opéra in ways that were without precedent. Every element of the Opéra's activity was subjugated to the exigency of Empire; the selection or artists, works and more general questions of artistic policy were handed over to politicians. The Opéra effectively became a branch of government. The result was a stagnation of the Opéra's repertory, and beneficiaries were the composers of larger-scale works for competing organisations: the Opéra Comique and the Théâtre Lyrique.

Razabilly

CHAPTER 4 Your Roots Are Showing: Tracing Genealogies and Building Cultural Memory through the Malleable Canon of the Greater Los Angeles Rockabilly Scene In this chapter, I examine music as an activity system in the Raza Rockabilly ...

Author: Nicholas F. Centino

Publisher: University of Texas Press

ISBN: 9781477323519

Category: Social Science

Page: 219

View: 927

DOWNLOAD →

Vocals tinged with pain and desperation. The deep thuds of an upright bass. Women with short bangs and men in cuffed jeans. These elements and others are the unmistakable signatures of rockabilly, a musical genre normally associated with white male musicians of the 1950s. But in Los Angeles today, rockabilly's primary producers and consumers are Latinos and Latinas. Why are these "Razabillies" partaking in a visibly "un-Latino" subculture that's thought of as a white person's fixation everywhere else? As a Los Angeles Rockabilly insider, Nicholas F. Centino is the right person to answer this question. Pairing a decade of participant observation with interviews and historical research, Centino explores the reasons behind a Rockabilly renaissance in 1990s Los Angeles and demonstrates how, as a form of working-class leisure, this scene provides Razabillies with spaces of respite and conviviality within the alienating landscape of the urban metropolis. A nuanced account revealing how and why Los Angeles Latinas/os have turned to and transformed the music and aesthetic style of 1950s rockabilly, Razabilly offers rare insight into this musical subculture, its place in rock and roll history, and its passionate practitioners.

Situating Salsa

Global Markets and Local Meanings in Latin Popular Music Lise Waxer. becomes a merengue in honor of the ... musical historiography. Genealogies, as Joseph Roach writes, foreground collective memory and orature 146 FRANCES R APARICIO.

Author: Lise Waxer

Publisher: Routledge

ISBN: 9781135725419

Category: Music

Page: 350

View: 989

DOWNLOAD →

Situating Salsa offers the first comprehensive consideration of salsa music and its social impact, in its multiple transnational contexts.

Virginia Genealogies

A Genealogy of the Glassell Family of Scotland and Virginia Horace Edwin Hayden ... She was possessed of a most tenacious memory, which retained all the songs she had heard from nurses and country women in that sequestered part of the ...

Author: Horace Edwin Hayden

Publisher: Genealogical Publishing Com

ISBN: 9780806301747

Category: Reference

Page: 804

View: 766

DOWNLOAD →

Facsimile reprint. Originally publshed: Wilkes-Barre, Pa., 1891.

Devotional Refrains in Medieval Latin Song

This memory can extend beyond a single song; refrains frequently are, and have, memories of “their own genealogies in earlier texts as well.”1 As defined throughout this book, the Latin refrain is chiefly structural, repeating within ...

Author: Mary Channen Caldwell

Publisher: Cambridge University Press

ISBN: 9781009049986

Category: Music

Page:

View: 929

DOWNLOAD →

Throughout medieval Europe, male and female religious communities attached to churches, abbeys, and schools participated in devotional music making outside of the chanted liturgy. Newly collating over 400 songs from primary sources, this book reveals the role of Latin refrains and refrain songs in the musical lives of religious communities by employing novel interdisciplinary and analytical approaches to the study of medieval song. Through interpretive frameworks focused on time and temporality, performance, memory, inscription, and language, each chapter offers an original perspective on how refrains were created, transmitted, and performed. Arguing for the Latin refrain's significance as a marker of form and meaning, this book identifies it as a tool that communities used to negotiate their lived experiences of liturgical and calendrical time; to confirm their communal identity and belonging to song communities; and to navigate relationships between Latin and vernacular song and dance that emerge within their multilingual contexts.

Composing Community in Late Medieval Music

first composer to be honored with a polyphonic musical lament, “Armes amours / O flour des flours” by composer ... which she claims is “designed to exploit the 'audio-visual poetics' of memory”; 2. the creation of genealogies of ...

Author: Jane D. Hatter

Publisher: Cambridge University Press

ISBN: 9781108474917

Category: Art

Page: 301

View: 980

DOWNLOAD →

An exploration of what self-referential compositions reveal about late medieval musical networks, linking choirboys to canons and performers to theorists.

Memory Oblivion and Jewish Culture in Latin America

... especially as is it is expressed in rock music. Since the 1981 publication of Genealogies, winner of the Magda Donato Prize, the author's identity, especially her Jewish identity, has become a topic of critical analysis.

Author: Marjorie Agosín

Publisher: University of Texas Press

ISBN: 9780292706675

Category: History

Page: 273

View: 946

DOWNLOAD →

Latin America has been a refuge for Jews fleeing persecution from 1492, when Sepharad Jews were expelled from Spain, until well into the twentieth century, when European Jews sought sanctuary there from the horrors of the Nazi Holocaust. Vibrant Jewish communities have deep roots in countries such as Argentina, Mexico, Guatemala, and Chile—though members of these communities have at times experienced the pain of being "the other," ostracized by Christian society and even tortured by military governments. While commonalities of religion and culture link these communities across time and national boundaries, the Jewish experience in Latin America is irreducible to a single perspective. Only a multitude of voices can express it. This anthology gathers fifteen essays by historians, creative writers, artists, literary scholars, anthropologists, and social scientists who collectively tell the story of Jewish life in Latin America. Some of the pieces are personal tales of exile and survival; some explore Jewish humor and its role in amalgamating histories of past and present; and others look at serious episodes of political persecution and military dictatorship. As a whole, these challenging essays ask what Jewish identity is in Latin America and how it changes throughout history. They leave us to ponder the tantalizing question: Does being Jewish in the Americas speak to a transitory history or a more permanent one?

Opera as Institution

in the intermède musical was sung against a backdrop from Lucie de Lammermoor with the side-sets taken from the enchanted ... Everist, Genealogies of Musical Memory: Gluck in the Nineteenth-Century Parisian Imagination, forthcoming.

Author: Cristina Scuderi

Publisher: LIT Verlag Münster

ISBN: 9783643911490

Category: Opera

Page: 216

View: 747

DOWNLOAD →

This volume brings together ten essays focusing on the diversity of operatic institutions, their protagonists, and historical fortunes in Europe from 1730 to 1917. Its aim is not to understand operatic institutions as locally distinct and isolated organizations, but rather to perceive them as a part of a historically fluctuating, transnational network: a network that was shaped among other things by individual professionals and groups in the opera business (and beyond), as well as by specific socio-cultural and political surroundings. The volume offers new perspectives on a wide range of topics, including networks of cultural exchange, singers as agents in shaping institutional structures, and the influence of socio-cultural, diplomatic, and political factors on operatic production across international borders.