From Prejudice to Destruction

Explores the social, political, and religious conditions that gave rise to the antisemitic movement and examines its growth and development in Germany, France, Austria, and Hungary

Author: Jacob Katz

Publisher: Harvard University Press

ISBN: 0674325079

Category: History

Page: 392

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Explores the social, political, and religious conditions that gave rise to the antisemitic movement and examines its growth and development in Germany, France, Austria, and Hungary

History and Hate

The eight essays included in this volume are by noted scholars, each an expert in a specific historical period--from the ancient world to the twentieth century.

Author: David Berger

Publisher: Jewish Publication Society

ISBN: 9780827609891

Category: Social Science

Page: 150

View: 897

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The persistence of anti-Semitism is a phenomenon that challenges Jewish historians to make ethical judgments a part of historical analysis. This comprehensive collection meets that challenge as its authors provide fresh insight into the complexities of anti-Semitism. The eight essays included in this volume are by noted scholars, each an expert in a specific historical period--from the ancient world to the twentieth century.

Judaism

-William Mancester $ 15.00 From Prejudice to Destruction Anti - Semitism , 1700-1933 Jacob Katz This major reinterpretation of modern anti - Semitism blends the history of ideas with social analysis . Katz describes how a set of ...

Author:

Publisher:

ISBN: UCAL:B3938846

Category: Electronic journals

Page:

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Hate Prejudice and Racism

On one hand , the Jews were the most despised of humans — to be humiliated and destroyed , but on the other hand , they were to be saved if only they would embrace Christianity . In From Prejudice to Destruction ...

Author: Milton Kleg

Publisher: SUNY Press

ISBN: 079141535X

Category: Social Science

Page: 317

View: 422

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Hate Prejudice and Racism provides a comprehensive overview of the problems created by prejudiced attitudes, racist beliefs, and acts of discrimination, from the casual racial or ethnic joke to the unrestrained violence of a lynch mob. It addresses such topics as the nature of ethnicity, stereotyping, aggression, and hate groups and individuals who promote ethnic and racial hatred. Kleg's discussion of ethnicity and ethnic groups challenges us to reexamine the meaning of a multicultural society. He traces the history of race as a scientific concept and its use as a social concept designed to stigmatize and subordinate members of minority racial and ethnic groups. Chapters on prejudice, stereotyping, and discrimination scapegoating provide a foundation for the chapter on hate groups and haters, which includes in-depth descriptions of beliefs and activities of white-supremacist groups and individuals who promote racism and anti-Semitism. Finally, Kleg outlines implications of hate prejudice and racism for educators and all cultural workers, outlining suggestions on how to approach and study this important and controversial topic.

After Progress

Shlomo Avineri , The Making of Modern Zionism : Intellectual Origins of the Jewish State ( New York , 1981 ) ; Benjamin Ginsberg , The Fatal Embrace : Jews and the State ( Chicago , 1993 ) ; Jacob Katz , From Prejudice to Destruction ...

Author: Norman Birnbaum

Publisher: Oxford University Press

ISBN: 9780198028185

Category: History

Page: 448

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The twentieth century witnessed a profound shift in both socialism and social reform. In the early 1900s, social reform seemed to offer a veritable religion of redemption, but by the century's end, while socialism remained a vibrant force in European society, a culture of extreme individualism and consumption all but squeezed the welfare state out of existence. Documenting this historic change, After Progress: European Socialism and American Social Reform in the 20th Century is the first truly comprehensive look at the course of social reform and Western politics after Communism, brilliantly explained by a major social thinker of our time. Norman Birnbaum traces in fascinating detail the forces that have shifted social concern over the course of a century, from the devastation of two world wars, to the post-war golden age of economic growth and democracy, to the ever-increasing dominance of the market. He makes sense of the historical trends that have created a climate in which politicians proclaim the arrival of a new historical epoch but rarely offer solutions to social problems that get beyond cost-benefit analyses. Birnbaum goes one step further and proposes a strategy for bringing the market back into balance with the social needs of the people. He advocates a reconsideration of the notion of work, urges that market forces be brought under political control, and stresses the need for education that teaches the rights and responsibilities of citizenship. Both a sweeping historical survey and a sharp-edged commentary on current political posturing, After Progress examines the state of social reform past, present and future.

Toward Modernity

Toward Modernity compares modernization in Germany with its counterparts in other countries to see if the German-Jewish development had any influence on what transpired elsewhere.

Author: Jacob Katz

Publisher: Transaction Publishers

ISBN: UCAL:B4956146

Category: History

Page: 279

View: 624

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Toward Modernity compares modernization in Germany with its counterparts in other countries to see if the German-Jewish development had any influence on what transpired elsewhere. The authors explore the history of Jewish modernization in Russia, Galicia, Vienna, Prague, Hungary, Holland, France, England, Italy, and the United States

The Jewish Reformation

For discussion, see Katz, From Prejudice to Destruction, 13–22; Manuel, The Broken Staff, 151–154. Even Mendelssohn's friend Lessing, who was known for his strikingly positive views of Jews, criticized the rabbis for their “petty, ...

Author: Michah Gottlieb

Publisher: Oxford University Press

ISBN: 9780199336395

Category: Religion

Page: 256

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In the late eighteenth century, German Jews began entering the middle class with remarkable speed. That upward mobility, it has often been said, coincided with Jews' increasing alienation from religion and Jewish nationhood. In fact, Michah Gottlieb argues, this period was one of intense engagement with Jewish texts and traditions. One expression of this was the remarkable turn to Bible translation. In the century and a half beginning with Moses Mendelssohn's pioneering translation and the final one by Martin Buber and Franz Rosenzweig, German Jews produced sixteen different translations of at least the Pentateuch. Exploring Bible translations by Mendelssohn, Leopold Zunz, and Samson Raphael Hirsch, Michah Gottlieb argues that each translator sought a "reformation" of Judaism along bourgeois lines, which involved aligning Judaism with a Protestant concept of religion. Buber and Rosenzweig famously critiqued bourgeois German Judaism as a craven attempt to establish social respectability to facilitate Jews' entry into the middle class through a vapid, domesticated Judaism. But Mendelssohn, Zunz, and Hirsch saw in bourgeois values the best means to serve God and the authentic actualization of Jewish tradition. Through their learned, creative Bible translations, these scholars presented competing visions of middle-class Judaism that affirmed Jewish nationhood while lighting the path to a purposeful, emotionally-rich spiritual life grounded in ethical responsibility.

Faith and Freedom

See Eisenmenger, Entdecktes Judenthum, 2:397–400 discussed in Katz, From Prejudice to Destruction, 13–22. Eisenmenger's critical view of the Jews' moral qualities and religious beliefs was of a piece with critiques coming from the ...

Author: Michah Gottlieb

Publisher: Oxford University Press

ISBN: 0199838240

Category: Religion

Page: 224

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The recent renewal of the faith-reason debate has focused attention on earlier episodes in its history. One of its memorable highlights occurred during the Enlightenment, with the outbreak of the "Pantheism Controversy" between the eighteenth century Jewish philosopher Moses Mendelssohn and the Christian Counter-Enlightenment thinker Friedrich Heinrich Jacobi. While Mendelssohn argued that reason confirmed belief in a providential God and in an immortal soul, Jacobi claimed that its consistent application led ineluctably to atheism and fatalism. At present, there are two leading interpretations of Moses Mendelssohn's thought. One casts him as a Jewish traditionalist who draws on German philosophy to support his premodern Jewish beliefs, while the other portrays him as a secret Deist who seeks to encourage his fellow Jews to integrate into German society and so disingenuously defends Judaism to avoid arousing their opposition. By exploring the Pantheism Controversy and Mendelssohn's relation to his two greatest Jewish philosophical predecessors, the medieval Rabbi Moses Maimonides and the seventeenth century heretic Baruch Spinoza, Michah Gottlieb presents a new reading of Mendelssohn arguing that he defends Jewish religious concepts sincerely, but gives them a humanistic interpretation appropriate to life in a free, diverse modern society. Gottlieb argues that the faith-reason debate is best understood not primarily as an argument about metaphysical questions, such as whether or not God exists, but rather as a contest between two competing conceptions of human dignity and freedom. Mendelssohn, Gottlieb contends, gives expression to a humanistic religious perspective worthy of renewed consideration today.