Everyday Law in Russia

Everyday Law in Russia challenges the prevailing common wisdom that Russians cannot rely on their law and that Russian courts are hopelessly politicized and corrupt.

Author: Kathryn Hendley

Publisher: Cornell University Press

ISBN: 9781501708091

Category: Law

Page: 304

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Everyday Law in Russia challenges the prevailing common wisdom that Russians cannot rely on their law and that Russian courts are hopelessly politicized and corrupt. While acknowledging the persistence of verdicts dictated by the Kremlin in politically charged cases, Kathryn Hendley explores how ordinary Russian citizens experience law. Relying on her own extensive observational research in Russia’s new justice-of-the-peace courts as well as her analysis of a series of focus groups, she documents Russians’ complicated attitudes regarding law. The same Russian citizen who might shy away from taking a dispute with a state agency or powerful individual to court might be willing to sue her insurance company if it refuses to compensate her for damages following an auto accident. Hendley finds that Russian judges pay close attention to the law in mundane disputes, which account for the vast majority of the cases brought to the Russian courts. Any reluctance on the part of ordinary Russian citizens to use the courts is driven primarily by their fear of the time and cost—measured in both financial and emotional terms—of the judicial process. Like their American counterparts, Russians grow more willing to pursue disputes as the social distance between them and their opponents increases; Russians are loath to sue friends and neighbors, but are less reluctant when it comes to strangers or acquaintances. Hendley concludes that the "rule of law" rubric is ill suited to Russia and other authoritarian polities where law matters most—but not all—of the time.

Immigration and Refugee Law in Russia

Immigration and Refugee Law in Russia confronts the issue of access to justice and the realisation of human rights for migrants and refugees in Russia.

Author: Agnieszka Kubal

Publisher:

ISBN: 1108405983

Category: Emigration and immigration law

Page:

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Immigration and Refugee Law in Russia confronts the issue of access to justice and the realisation of human rights for migrants and refugees in Russia. It focuses on everyday experiences of immigration and refugee laws and how they work 'in action' in Russia. This investigation presupposes that the reality is much more complex than is generally assumed, as it is mediated by peoples' varied positionalities. Agnieszka Kubal's primary focus is on people, their stories and experiences: migrants, asylum seekers, refugees, immigration lawyers, Russian judges, and the Federal Migration Service officers. These actors speak with different voices, profess different ideologies, and hold opposite worldviews; what they hold in common is their importance to our understanding of migration processes. By this focus on individual views and opinions, Kubal highlights the complexity and nuance of everyday experiences of the law, breaking away from the portrayal of Russia as a legal and ideological monolith.

The Rule of Law in Russia

This book explores how, over two centuries, the Russian meaning of the rule of law has been reflected in the legal doctrine, legislation, formal and informal practices of legal and political institutions, and also everyday life and the ...

Author: Alexei Trochev

Publisher: Hart Publishing

ISBN: 9781509948086

Category: Law

Page: 240

View: 791

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How and why do the rule of law ideas shape the origins and functioning of the Russian state and society? This book explores how, over two centuries, the Russian meaning of the rule of law has been reflected in the legal doctrine, legislation, formal and informal practices of legal and political institutions, and also everyday life and the perceptions of Russian citizens at large and certain minority groups. The authors argue that legal dualism – the tension between constitutionalism and political expediency – explains the rise and fall of multiple ways in which the parts of the Russian state interact with each other and with citizens, and in which citizens and businesses interact among themselves both at home and abroad. Explaining the peaceful co-existence of these multiple ways of law, this book goes beyond the mainstream accounts of instrumental uses of law and lawlessness in Russia and offers novel ways of understanding the myriad ways in which law may matter in authoritarian regimes.

Law and the Russian State

With a detailed bibliography, this is an important text for anyone seeking a sophisticated understanding of how Russian society and the Russian state have developed in the last 350 years.

Author: William E. Pomeranz

Publisher: Bloomsbury Publishing

ISBN: 9781474224246

Category: History

Page: 240

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Russia is often portrayed as a regressive, even lawless country, and yet the Russian state has played a major role in shaping and experimenting with law as an instrument of power. In Law and the Russian State, William E. Pomeranz examines Russia's legal evolution from Peter the Great to Vladimir Putin, addressing the continuities and disruptions of Russian law during the imperial, Soviet, and post-Soviet. The book covers key themes, including: * Law and empire * Law and modernization * The politicization of law * The role of intellectuals and dissidents in mobilizing the law * The evolution of Russian legal institutions * The struggle for human rights * The rule-of-law * The quest to establish the law-based state It also analyzes legal culture and how Russians understand and use the law. With a detailed bibliography, this is an important text for anyone seeking a sophisticated understanding of how Russian society and the Russian state have developed in the last 350 years.

Immigration and Refugee Law in Russia

(2017). Everyday Law in Russia. Ithaca, NY, Cornell University Press. Hetherington, K. (2008). 'Populist transparency: The documentation of reality in rural Paraguay'. Journal of Legal Anthropology 1(1): 45–69. Hilbink, T. M. (2004).

Author: Agniezka Kubal

Publisher: Cambridge University Press

ISBN: 9781108417891

Category: History

Page: 250

View: 717

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How do immigration and refugee laws work 'in action' in Russia? This book offers a complex, empirical and nuanced understanding.

Labour Law in Russia

The Russian legal system itself should be interested in learning from the approaches and conclusions of the ECtHR to avoid resorting to the European ... References to the decisions of ECtHR in everyday legal practice Elena Sychenko 305.

Author: Vladimir Lebedev

Publisher: Cambridge Scholars Publishing

ISBN: 9781443870955

Category: Business & Economics

Page: 330

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Russias transition towards a market economy in the early 1990s called for new approaches to the regulation of employment relations in the post-Soviet period in order to strike a balance between employers interests and employees rights in changed conditions. The adoption of the Labour Code of the Russian Federation (LC RF) in 2001 contributed to solving the issue only partly, as, in reality, it was passed as a compromise between different political forces, and consists of both provisions which can be implemented in the new context of the market economy and restrictions inherited from the planned economy. The recent and ever-changing socio-economic conditions, and the increasing complexity of the employer-employee relationship, which is a result of both globalization and technological progress, required the further development of Russian employment legislation. This resulted in substantial amendments being made to the original LC RF in 2006, with the majority of its provisions being profoundly revised. Nevertheless, a thorough analysis of the changes currently under way shows that many aspects concerning employment relations have still not been addressed sufficiently. The papers collected in the present volume of the ADAPT Labour Studies Book Series consider the recent developments of the legal regulation of employment relations as well as some closely related aspects from a historical and comparative perspective, in order to provide some insights into these issues and to examine current challenges.

Law and Power in Russia

Making Sense of Quasi-Legal Practices Håvard Bækken. Reforming Justice in Russia 1864-1966. ... Legal Failure. Law and Social Norms in PostCommunist Europe. In: Galligan, D.J. & Kurkchiyan, M. (eds.). ... Everyday Law in Russia.

Author: Håvard Bækken

Publisher: Routledge

ISBN: 9781351335348

Category: Social Science

Page: 228

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This book explores the issue of selective law enforcement, arguing that the manipulation of the legal system by powerful insiders is a distinctive feature of Putinism, reflecting both its hybrid authoritarianism and Russian legal culture. Based on extensive research including interviews with the victims of selective law enforcement, the book analyses how selective law enforcement works in Russia, discusses the link between law and power, and relates the Russian situation to examples from elsewhere and to general legal theories and ideas of political hybridity.

Putin s Russia

For more on the dualistic nature of the contemporary Russian legal system, see Kathryn Hendley, Everyday Law in Russia (Ithaca, NY: Cornell University Press, 2017). 3. For an overview of the rule of law, see Lon L. Fuller, The Morality ...

Author: Stephen K. Wegren

Publisher: Rowman & Littlefield

ISBN: 9781538114278

Category: Political Science

Page: 360

View: 349

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Now in a thoroughly revised, expanded, and updated edition, this classic text provides an authoritative and current analysis of contemporary Russia. Leading scholars explore the daunting domestic and international problems Russia confronts, considering a comprehensive array of economic, political, foreign policy, and social issues.

A Sociology of Justice in Russia

This volume features contributions from a number of scholars who studied Russia empirically and in-depth, through extensive field research, observations in courts, and interviews with judges and other legal professionals as well as lay ...

Author: Marina Kurkchiyan

Publisher: Cambridge University Press

ISBN: 9781108187633

Category: Law

Page:

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Much of the media coverage and academic literature on Russia suggests that the justice system is unreliable, ineffective and corrupt. But what if we look beyond the stereotypes and preconceptions? This volume features contributions from a number of scholars who studied Russia empirically and in-depth, through extensive field research, observations in courts, and interviews with judges and other legal professionals as well as lay actors. A number of tensions in the everyday experiences of justice in Russia are identified and the concept of the 'administerial model of justice' is introduced to illuminate some of the less obvious layers of Russian legal tradition including: file-driven procedure, extreme legal formalism combined with informality of the pre-trial proceedings, followed by ritualistic format of the trial. The underlying argument is that Russian justice is a much more complex system than is commonly supposed, and that it both requires and deserves a more nuanced understanding.