Emily Davies

Collected Letters, 1861-1875 Emily Davies Ann B. Murphy, Deirdre Raftery, Herbert F. Tucker. her formidable contributions, and taken together they constitute a striking view of the changing world of middle—class women in nineteenth ...

Author: Emily Davies

Publisher: University of Virginia Press

ISBN: 9780813922324

Category: Literary Collections

Page: 555

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Sarah Emily Davies (1830--1921) lived and crusaded during a time of profound change for education and women's rights in England. At the time of her birth, women's suffrage was scarcely open to discussion, and not one of England's universities (there were four) admitted women. By the time of her death, not only had the number of universities grown to twelve, all of which were open to women; women had also begun to get the vote. Davies's own activism in the women's movement and in the social and educational reform movements of the time culminated in her founding of Girton College, Cambridge University, the first residential college of higher education for women. Much of the social change that Davies witnessed -- and helped to effect -- was discussed, encouraged, and elicited through her personal correspondence. These letters, written to friends, allies, and potential supporters during the years of Davies's greatest political and social activity, reveal the evolution of her skill and sophistication as an activist. They also show the development of women's suffrage, education, and journalism movements from a group of loosely affiliated like-minded friends to an astute and organized political network of reformers. In these letters--most of which have never been published -- we see Davies struggle to understand and theorize about the role of women, cajole and encourage potential supporters, explore complexities of various reform movements, and demonstrate her formidable attention to detail in inventing and constructing an imaginable new institution. Her intensely engaged life placed Davies at the very heart of the events that transformed her era. Ann B. Murphy is Associate Professor of English at Assumption College. Deirdre Raftery, Lecturer in Education at University College Dublin, is the author of Emily Davies:Women and Learning in English Writing, 1600--1900. Victorian Literature and Culture Series

CONVICT EMILY DAVIES

Hudson went to collect Emily's kitbag and placed that into the boat. Kevin went to find his things in the crews section. ... The women joined them and helped to get the goods up to the cookhouse. 126 Convict Emily Davies.

Author: Angus Hyslop

Publisher: Lulu.com

ISBN: 9781387029020

Category: History

Page: 284

View: 809

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THE STORY OF A YOUNG GIRL IN ENGLAND WHO IS TRANSPORTED TO VAN DIEMENS LAND AS A CONVICT FOR A CRIME SHE DID NOT COMMIT. A STORY OF HARDSHIP, POVERTY, INJUSTICE, LOVE & SORROW, CRUELTY & KINDNESS, HOPE JOY & HAPPINESS. A BOOK THAT IS HARD TO PUT DOWN. A STORY YOU WILL NEVER FORGET.

Emily Davies and the Liberation of Women

Emily Davies felt that it was a great advantage that she came from quite a different background , because this would mean that many new people would hear of the college and begin to send their daughters . The great disadvantage of not ...

Author: Daphne Bennett

Publisher: Andre Deutsch Limited

ISBN: UVA:X001665168

Category: Social Science

Page: 279

View: 878

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Elizabeth Garrett Anderson

2 Elizabeth Garrett to Emily Davies, 17 Aug. 1860. Fawcett Library. 1 Thomson, H. C, op. cit. pp. 66–9. 2 Elizabeth Garrett to Emily Davies, 17 Aug. 1860. Fawcett Library. 1 Elizabeth Garrett to Emily Davies, 6 Sept. 1860.

Author: Jo Manton

Publisher: Routledge

ISBN: 9780429685620

Category: History

Page: 396

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First published in 1965. In 1865, a woman first obtained a legal qualification in this country as physician and surgeon. Elizabeth Garrett surprised public opinion by the calm obstinacy with which she fought for her own medical education and that of the young women who followed her. This full biography is based largely on unpublished material from the hospitals and medical schools where Elizabeth Garrett Anderson worked, and the private papers of the Garrett and Anderson families. This title will be of great interest to history of science students.

Emily Davies

Sarah Emily Davies (1830–1921) lived and crusaded during a time of profound change for education and women’s rights in England.

Author: Ann B. Murphy

Publisher: University of Virginia Press

ISBN: 9780813923918

Category: Literary Criticism

Page: 672

View: 225

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Sarah Emily Davies (1830–1921) lived and crusaded during a time of profound change for education and women’s rights in England. At the time of her birth, women’s suffrage was scarcely open to discussion, and not one of England’s universities (there were four) admitted women. By the time of her death, not only had the number of universities grown to twelve, all of which were open to women; women had also begun to get the vote. Davies’s own activism in the women’s movement and in the social and educational reform movements of the time culminated in her founding of Girton College, Cambridge University, the first residential college of higher education for women. Much of the social change that Davies witnessed—and helped to effect—was discussed, encouraged, and elicited through her personal correspondence. These letters, written to friends, allies, and potential supporters during the years of Davies’s greatest political and social activity, reveal the evolution of her skill and sophistication as an activist. They also show the development of women’s suffrage, education, and journalism movements from a group of loosely affiliated like-minded friends to an astute and organized political network of reformers. In these letters–most of which have never been published—we see Davies struggle to understand and theorize about the role of women, cajole and encourage potential supporters, explore complexities of various reform movements, and demonstrate her formidable attention to detail in inventing and constructing an imaginable new institution. Her intensely engaged life placed Davies at the very heart of the events that transformed her era.

Girl Trouble

One of the movement's most effective educational campaigners was Emily Davies.11 Uncompromising in principle, Davies was an intrepid opportunist in strategy, employing all manner of tactics and relentless pressure in pursuit of her ...

Author: Professor Carol Dyhouse

Publisher: Zed Books Ltd.

ISBN: 9781780325569

Category: History

Page: 320

View: 229

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'A brilliant cultural history.' Irish Examiner Girls behave badly. If they're not obscenity-shouting, pint-swigging ladettes, they're narcissistic, living dolls floating around in a cloud of self-obsession, far too busy twerking to care. And this is news. In this witty and wonderful book, Carol Dyhouse shows that where there's a social scandal or a wave of moral outrage, you can bet a girl is to blame. Whether it be stories of 'brazen flappers' staying out and up all night in the 1920s, inappropriate places for Mars bars in the 1960s or Courtney Love's mere existence in the 1990s, bad girls have been a mass-media staple for more than a century. And yet, despite the continued obsession with their perceived faults and blatant disobedience, girls are infinitely better off today than they were a century ago. This is the story of the challenges and opportunities faced by young women growing up in the swirl of the twentieth century, and the pop-hysteria that continues to accompany their progress.