Air Power in the Malayan Emergency

By the summer of 1948 the scale of insurrection was such that Emergency Powers were invoked by the Federal Government on 16 June and the military authorities were called in to assist the civil administration in restoring law and order - and ...

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ISBN: 1526726122

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Page: 256

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As early as the 1920s Communist Soviet and then Chinese agents had been infiltrating Malaya and in 1929 the Malayan Communist Party (MCP) was formed with the intention of overthrowing the Malayan Administration and establishing a Communist-controlled democratic republic. When Japan invaded China, support for the MCP grew and, ironically, following the Japanese occupation of Malaya in 1941, it was the MCP which received backing from Britain as the principle force capable of mounting guerrilla operations against the invaders. After the end of the Second World War, the MCP revived its original aims through peaceful means but found little popular support amongst the Malayans. So the Communists turned to violence, with a program of murders and sabotage. By the summer of 1948 the scale of insurrection was such that Emergency Powers were invoked by the Federal Government on 16 June and the military authorities were called in to assist the civil administration in restoring law and order - and this included squadrons of the RAF, RAAF, RNZAF, and the local auxiliary and national air forces. The difficulties of operating in a country the size of England and Wales, of which 80 per cent is dense jungle, against a mobile force of less than 10,000 were immense. Yet over the course of the Emergency a highly-effective system of rapid response to guerrilla attacks and planned offensive strikes was developed. Though never amounting to more than six or seven squadrons, typically equipped with Spitfires, Beaufighters, Tempests, Lincolns and Sunderlands, and later with Vampires and Venoms, the RAF and Commonwealth crews helped the British and Malayan authorities defeat the insurgents.

Counterinsurgency Intelligence and the Emergency in Malaya

This book examines the full range of counterinsurgency intelligence during the Malayan Emergency.

Author: Roger C. Arditti

Publisher: Springer

ISBN: 9783030166953

Category: History

Page: 254

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This book examines the full range of counterinsurgency intelligence during the Malayan Emergency. It explores the involvement of the Security Service, the Joint Intelligence Committee (Far East), the Malayan Security Service, Special Branch and wider police service, and military intelligence, to examine how British and Malayan authorities tackled the insurgent challenge posed by the Malayan Communist Party. This study assesses the nature of the intelligence apparatus prior to the declaration of emergency in 1948 and considers how officials attempted to reconstruct the intelligence structures in the Far East after the surrender of the Japanese in 1945. These plans were largely based upon the legacy of the Second World War but quickly ran into difficultly because of ill-defined remits and personality clashes. Nevertheless, officials did provide prescient warning of the existential threat posed by the Malayan Communist Party from the earliest days of British reoccupation of Malaya. Once a state of emergency had been declared, officials struggled to find the right combination of methods, strategy and management structures to eliminate the threat posed by the Communist insurgents. This book argues that the development of an effective counterinsurgency intelligence strategy involved many more organisations than just Special Branch. It was a multifaceted, dynamic effort that took far longer and was more problematic than previous accounts suggest. The Emergency remains central to counterinsurgency theory and thus this wide-ranging analysis sheds crucial light not only on the period, but on contemporary doctrine and security practices today.

Emergency Propaganda

Sheds new light on the hitherto neglected years of the Emergency (1955-58) demonstrating how it was British propaganda which decisively ended the shooting war in December 1958.

Author: Kumar Ramakrishna

Publisher: Routledge

ISBN: 9781136602764

Category: Social Science

Page: 304

View: 808

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Sheds new light on the hitherto neglected years of the Emergency (1955-58) demonstrating how it was British propaganda which decisively ended the shooting war in December 1958. The study argues for a concept of 'propaganda' that embraces not merely 'words' in the form of film, radio and leaflets but also 'deeds'.

The Malayan Emergency

Souchou Yao tells its story in a series of penetrating and illuminating essays that range across a vast canvas. Throughout the book runs a passionate concern for the lives and struggles of ordinary men and women in colonial Malaya.

Author: Souchou Yao

Publisher:

ISBN: 8776941914

Category: Counterinsurgency

Page: 178

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The Malayan Emergency and Indonesian Confrontation

Beretter om briternes kamp mod kommunistiske terrorister i Malaysia og Borneo i perioderne 1948-1960 og 1962-1966.

Author: Robert Jackson

Publisher: Casemate Publishers

ISBN: 9781844157754

Category: History

Page: 156

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The struggle with Communist terrorists in Malaya known as The Emergency became a textbook example of how to fight a guerrilla war, based on political as much as military means. This book deals with both the campaign fought by British, Commonwealth and other security forces in Malaya against Communist insurgents, between 1948 and 1960, and also the security action in North Borneo during the period of Confrontation with Indonesia from 1962 to 1966. Both campaigns provided invaluable experience in the development of anti-guerrilla tactics, and are relevant to the conduct of similar actions which have been fought against insurgent elements since then. The book written with the full co-operation of various departments of the UK Ministry of Defence contains material that untilrecently remained classified.This is the first full study to cover the role of airpower in these conflicts. It will be of relevance to students at military colleges, and those studying military history, as well as having a more general appeal, particularly to those servicemen and women who were involved in both campaigns.

Hearts and Minds in Guerilla Warfare

This study provides an account of the origins, course, and outcome of the Malayan Emergency, which pitted the Malayan Government against the Malayan Communist Party, its rural-based guerilla army, and their supporters.

Author: Richard Stubbs

Publisher: Marshall Cavendish Academic

ISBN: UOM:39015060547687

Category: Political Science

Page: 300

View: 748

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This study provides an account of the origins, course, and outcome of the Malayan Emergency, which pitted the Malayan Government against the Malayan Communist Party, its rural-based guerilla army, and their supporters. Drawing on the widest set of sources used to date, the study goes well beyond traditional analyses of the Emergency and examines not just the military but also the administrative, economic, political, and social aspects of the guerrilla war. Taking a cue from the hearts and minds approach to the counter-guerrilla warfare, the study examines the hypothesis that the battleground of any guerrilla war is the general population whose actions are crucial in deciding how the war unfolds. The author sets out in detail the evolution of the policies of the Malayan Government and the Malayan Communist Party and plots the fortune of each side as the sympathies, allegiances, and actions of the people of Malaya were influenced by the constantly changing circumstances in which they found themselves. The study concludes by assessing the extent to which the lessons from the use of the hearts and minds approach in the Emergency maybe applied in the conduct of other counter-insurgency campaigns and by examining the impact of the guerrilla warfare on the political and economic development of Malaya and Malaysia.