Domestic Fiction in Colonial Australia and New Zealand

This essay collection explores attitudes to colonialism, imperialism and race, as well as important developments in girlhood and the concept of the New Woman.

Author: Tamara S Wagner

Publisher: Routledge

ISBN: 9781317317401

Category: Literary Criticism

Page: 240

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Colonial domestic literature has been largely overlooked and is due for a reassessment. This essay collection explores attitudes to colonialism, imperialism and race, as well as important developments in girlhood and the concept of the New Woman.

Domestic Fiction in Colonial Australia and New Zealand

It was there that most books by Australian and New Zealand authors continued to be published. As colonial magazines began to flourish, they provided a venue for serial fiction that could target local readerships and even a specific ...

Author: Tamara S Wagner

Publisher: Routledge

ISBN: 9781317317418

Category: Literary Criticism

Page: 240

View: 209

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Colonial domestic literature has been largely overlooked and is due for a reassessment. This essay collection explores attitudes to colonialism, imperialism and race, as well as important developments in girlhood and the concept of the New Woman.

Victorian Narratives of Failed Emigration

Domestic Fiction in Colonial Australia and New Zealand. London: Pickering and Chatto, 2014. Wagner, Tamara S.. 'Fugitive Homes: Multiple Migrations in Ethel Turner's Fiction'. In Domestic Fiction in Colonial Australia and New Zealand, ...

Author: Tamara S Wagner

Publisher: Routledge

ISBN: 9781317002161

Category: Literary Criticism

Page: 296

View: 858

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In her study of the unsuccessful nineteenth-century emigrant, Tamara S. Wagner argues that failed emigration and return drive nineteenth-century writing in English in unexpected, culturally revealing ways. Wagner highlights the hitherto unexplored subgenre of anti-emigration writing that emerged as an important counter-current to a pervasive emigration propaganda machine that was pressing popular fiction into its service. The exportation of characters at the end of a novel indisputably formed a convenient narrative solution that at once mirrored and exaggerated public policies about so-called 'superfluous' or 'redundant' parts of society. Yet the very convenience of such pat endings was increasingly called into question. New starts overseas might not be so easily realizable; emigration destinations failed to live up to the inflated promises of pro-emigration rhetoric; the 'unwanted' might make a surprising reappearance. Wagner juxtaposes representations of emigration in the works of Charles Dickens, Wilkie Collins, Frances Trollope, and Charlotte Yonge with Australian, New Zealand, and Canadian settler fiction by Elizabeth Murray, Clara Cheeseman, and Susanna Moodie, offering a new literary history not just of nineteenth-century migration, but also of transoceanic exchanges and genre formation.

Colonial Australian Fiction

Character Types, Social Formations and the Colonial Economy Ken Gelder, Rachael Weaver ... “Transcendentalism, Emerson and Nineteenth-Century Australian Literary Culture”. ... Domestic Fiction in Colonial Australia and New Zealand.

Author: Ken Gelder

Publisher: Sydney University Press

ISBN: 9781743324615

Category: Literary Criticism

Page: 161

View: 458

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Over the course of the nineteenth century a remarkable array of types appeared – and disappeared – in Australian literature: the swagman, the larrikin, the colonial detective, the bushranger, the “currency lass”, the squatter, and more. Some had a powerful influence on the colonies’ developing sense of identity; others were more ephemeral. But all had a role to play in shaping and reflecting the social and economic circumstances of life in the colonies. In Colonial Australian Fiction: Character Types, Social Formations and the Colonial Economy, Ken Gelder and Rachael Weaver explore the genres in which these characters flourished: the squatter novel, the bushranger adventure, colonial detective stories, the swagman’s yarn, the Australian girl’s romance. Authors as diverse as Catherine Helen Spence, Rosa Praed, Henry Kingsley, Anthony Trollope, Henry Lawson, Miles Franklin, Barbara Baynton, Rolf Boldrewood, Mary Fortune and Marcus Clarke were fascinated by colonial character types, and brought them vibrantly to life. As this book shows, colonial Australian character types are fluid, contradictory and often unpredictable. When we look closely, they have the potential to challenge our assumptions about fiction, genre and national identity. The preliminary pages and introduction to this work are available free to download at the Sydney eScholarship Repository: https://hdl.handle.net/2123/16435 Contents Introduction: The Colonial Economy and the Production of Colonial Character Types 1 The Reign of the Squatter 2 Bushrangers 3 Colonial Australian Detectives 4 Bush Types and Metropolitan Types 5 The Australian Girl Works Cited Index About the series The Sydney Studies in Australian Literature series publishes original, peer-reviewed research in the field of Australian literature. The series comprises monographs devoted to the works of major authors and themed collections of essays about current issues in the field of Australian literary studies. The series offers well-researched and engagingly written re-evaluations of the nature and importance of Australian literature, and aims to reinvigorate its study both in Australia and internationally.

Erz hltes Selbst The Narrated Self

Domestic Fiction and the Reform of Colonial Slavery, Ithaca/London 2006; TAMARA S. WAGNER (Hg.), Domestic Fiction in Colonial Australia and New Zealand, London/New York 2014. (Der Begriff scheint schon einige Jahrzehnte vorher in ...

Author: Jochen Schmidt

Publisher: Evangelische Verlagsanstalt

ISBN: 9783374061181

Category: Religion

Page: 208

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Dieser Band versammelt Beiträge zum weiten Gebiet der narrativen Ethik mit einem Schwerpunkt auf erzählender Literatur und Prozessen der Selbsterzählung. Am Anfang stehen Beiträge zum Stand der Forschung zur narrativen Ethik aus theologischer Perspektive und zur Frage nach dem theologischen Zugriff auf literarische Texte sowie der Situierung narrativer Ethik im interkulturellen Kontext. Ein zweiter Teil legt den Fokus auf Aushandlungen von Identität in autobiographischen Texten. Exemplarisch werden Quellen aus der Antike, der Zeit um 1800 und dem 20. Jahrhundert ausgewertet. Abschließend widmen sich Beiträge der Bedeutung von Selbsterzählung im Zusammenhang von seelischem Leiden und Suchtkrankheit. [The Narrated Self. Narrative Ethics from the Perspectives of Theology and Literary Studies] The contributions to this collection belong to the vast field of narrative ethics, with a focus on narrative literature and the processes of self-narration. The first section looks at the current scholarly field of narrative ethics in theology and at theological approaches to literary texts. The focus of the second section of the collection is on the negotiations of identity in autobiographical texts. There is a particular emphasis on exemplary sources from antiquity and from the time of the 19th and 20th centuries. The last two chapters of the collection inquire into the meaning of self-narration in the realm of mental suffering and addictive illness.

The Routledge Research Companion to Anthony Trollope

... and New Zealand, 762–8; Janet C. Myers, '“Verily the Antipodes of Home”: The Domestic Novel in the Australian Bush,' ... of the Settler Home,' in Tamara S. Wagner, ed., Domestic Fiction in Colonial Australia and New Zealand (London: ...

Author: Deborah Denenholz Morse

Publisher: Routledge

ISBN: 9781317044147

Category: Literary Criticism

Page: 442

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Bringing together leading and newly emerging scholars, The Routledge Research Companion to Anthony Trollope offers a comprehensive overview of Trollope scholarship and suggests new directions in Trollope studies. The first volume designed especially for advanced graduate students and scholars, the collection features essays on virtually every topic relevant to Trollope research, including the law, gender, politics, evolution, race, anti-Semitism, biography, philosophy, illustration, aging, sport, emigration, and the global and regional worlds.

The Routledge Companion to Victorian Literature

Domestic Fiction in Colonial Australia and New Zealand, edited by Tamara S. Wagner, Pickering & Chatto, 2014, pp. 75–89. Spence, Catherine Helen. “Australian Federation and Imperial Union.” Fraser's Magazine, vol. 16, 1877, pp. 526–7.

Author: Dennis Denisoff

Publisher: Routledge

ISBN: 9780429018176

Category: Literary Criticism

Page: 540

View: 877

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The Routledge Companion to Victorian Literature offers 45 chapters by leading international scholars working with the most dynamic and influential political, cultural, and theoretical issues addressing Victorian literature today. Scholars and students will find this collection both useful and inspiring. Rigorously engaged with current scholarship that is both historically sensitive and theoretically informed, the Routledge Companion places the genres of the novel, poetry, and drama and issues of gender, social class, and race in conversation with subjects like ecology, colonialism, the Gothic, digital humanities, sexualities, disability, material culture, and animal studies. This guide is aimed at scholars who want to know the most significant critical approaches in Victorian studies, often written by the very scholars who helped found those fields. It addresses major theoretical movements such as narrative theory, formalism, historicism, and economic theory, as well as Victorian models of subjects such as anthropology, cognitive science, and religion. With its lists of key works, rich cross-referencing, extensive bibliographies, and explications of scholarly trajectories, the book is a crucial resource for graduate students and advanced undergraduates, while offering invaluable support to more seasoned scholars.

Imagined Homelands

For the Australian poetic tradition, see Judith Wright, Preoccupations in Australian Poetry; Michael Ackland, That Shining Band; ... The Novel and the Sea; and Tamara Wagner, ed., Domestic Fiction in Colonial Australia and New Zealand.

Author: Jason R. Rudy

Publisher: JHU Press

ISBN: 9781421423920

Category: Literary Criticism

Page: 247

View: 862

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Imagined Homelands chronicles the emerging cultures of nineteenth-century British settler colonialism, focusing on poetry as a genre especially equipped to reflect colonial experience. Jason Rudy argues that the poetry of Victorian-era Australia, New Zealand, South Africa, and Canada—often disparaged as derivative and uncouth—should instead be seen as vitally engaged in the social and political work of settlement. The book illuminates cultural pressures that accompanied the unprecedented growth of British emigration across the nineteenth century. It also explores the role of poetry as a mediator between familiar British ideals and new colonial paradigms within emerging literary markets from Sydney and Melbourne to Cape Town and Halifax. Rudy focuses on the work of poets both canonical—including Tennyson, Browning, Longfellow, and Hemans—and relatively obscure, from Adam Lindsay Gordon, Susanna Moodie, and Thomas Pringle to Henry Kendall and Alexander McLachlan. He examines in particular the nostalgic relations between home and abroad, core and periphery, whereby British emigrants used both original compositions and canonical British works to imagine connections between their colonial experiences and the lives they left behind in Europe. Drawing on archival work from four continents, Imagined Homelands insists on a wider geographic frame for nineteenth-century British literature. From lyrics printed in newspapers aboard emigrant ships heading to Australia and South Africa, to ballads circulating in New Zealand and Canadian colonial journals, poetry was a vibrant component of emigrant life. In tracing the histories of these poems and the poets who wrote them, this book provides an alternate account of nineteenth-century British poetry and, more broadly, of settler colonial culture.

Becoming Home Diaspora and the Anglophone Transnational

“Identifying with the Frontier: Federation New Woman, Nation and Empire. ... Australian Literary Studies, vol. 22, no. ... Domestic Fiction in Colonial Australia and New Zealand, edited by Tamara S. Wagner, Pickering & Chatto, 2016, pp.

Author: Jude V. Nixon

Publisher: Vernon Press

ISBN: 9781648893544

Category: Social Science

Page: 246

View: 140

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“Becoming Home: Diaspora and the Anglophone Transnational” is a collection of essays exploring national identity, migration, exile, colonialism, postcolonialism, slavery, race, and gender in the literature of the Anglophone world. The volume focuses on the dispersion or scattering of people in exile, and how those with an existing homeland and those displaced, without a politically recognized sovereign state, negotiate displacement and the experience of living at home-abroad. This group includes expatriate minority communities existing uneasily and nostalgically on the margins of their host country. The diaspora becomes an important cultural phenomenon in the formation of national identities and opposing attempts to transcend the idea of nationhood itself on its way to developing new forms of transnationalism. Chapters on the literature or national allegories of the diaspora and the transnational explore the diverse and geographically expansive ways in which Anglophone literature by colonized subjects and emigrants negotiates diasporic spaces to create imagined communities or a sense of home. Themes explored within these pages include restlessness, tensions, trauma, ambiguities, assimilation, estrangement, myth, nostalgia, sentimentality, homesickness, national schizophrenia, divided loyalties, intellectual capital, and geographical interstices. Special attention is paid to the complex ways identity is negotiated by immigrants to Anglophone countries writing in English about their home-abroad experience. The lived experiences of emigrants of the diaspora create a literature rife with tensions concerning identity, language, and belongingness in the struggle for home. Focusing on writers in particular geopolitical spaces, the essays in the collection offer an active conversation with leading theorizers of the diaspora and the transnational, including Edward Said, Bill Ashcroft, William Safran, Gabriel Sheffer, Stuart Hall, Homi Bhabha, Frantz Fanon, and Benedict Anderson. This volume cuts across the broad geopolitical space of the Anglophone world of literature and cultural studies and will appeal to professors, scholars, graduate, and undergraduate students in English, comparative literature, history, ethnic and race studies, diaspora studies, migration, and transnational studies. The volume will also be an indispensable aid to public policy experts.

Victorian Ecocriticism

Domestic Fiction in Colonial Australia and New Zealand. Edited by Tamara S. Wagner, 63–73. London: Pickering & Chatto, 2014. Patmore, Coventry. The Angel in the House. The Norton Anthology of English Literature, 9th ed. vol.

Author: Dewey W. Hall

Publisher: Lexington Books

ISBN: 9781498551076

Category: History

Page: 210

View: 806

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This interdisciplinary collection explores Victorian literature and its connection to various fields such as environmental history, ecology, and evolutionary biology. Further, the edition features seminal nineteenth-century figures advancing the cause of early environmental justice linked to place.