Defining the Wind

But what Huler discovered is that the scale that carries Beaufort’s name has a long and complex evolution, and to properly understand it he had to keep reaching farther back in history, into the lives and works of figures from Daniel ...

Author: Scott Huler

Publisher: Crown

ISBN: 9780307420558

Category: Science

Page: 304

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“Nature, rightly questioned, never lies.” —A Manual of Scientific Enquiry, Third Edition, 1859 Scott Huler was working as a copy editor for a small publisher when he stumbled across the Beaufort Wind Scale in his Merriam Webster Collegiate Dictionary. It was one of those moments of discovery that writers live for. Written centuries ago, its 110 words launched Huler on a remarkable journey over land and sea into a fascinating world of explorers, mariners, scientists, and writers. After falling in love with what he decided was “the best, clearest, and most vigorous piece of descriptive writing I had ever seen,” Huler went in search of Admiral Francis Beaufort himself: hydrographer to the British Admiralty, man of science, and author—Huler assumed—of the Beaufort Wind Scale. But what Huler discovered is that the scale that carries Beaufort’s name has a long and complex evolution, and to properly understand it he had to keep reaching farther back in history, into the lives and works of figures from Daniel Defoe and Charles Darwin to Captains Bligh, of the Bounty, and Cook, of the Endeavor. As hydrographer to the British Admiralty it was Beaufort’s job to track the information that ships relied on: where to lay anchor, descriptions of ports, information about fortification, religion, and trade. But what came to fascinate Huler most about Beaufort was his obsession for observing things and communicating to others what the world looked like. Huler’s research landed him in one of the most fascinating and rich periods of history, because all around the world in the mid-eighteenth and nineteenth centuries, in a grand, expansive period, modern science was being invented every day. These scientific advancements encompassed not only vast leaps in understanding but also how scientific innovation was expressed and even organized, including such enduring developments as the scale Anders Celsius created to simplify how Gabriel Fahrenheit measured temperature; the French-designed metric system; and the Gregorian calendar adopted by France and Great Britain. To Huler, Beaufort came to embody that passion for scientific observation and categorization; indeed Beaufort became the great scientific networker of his time. It was he, for example, who was tapped to lead the search for a naturalist in the 1830s to accompany the crew of the Beagle; he recommended a young naturalist named Charles Darwin. Defining the Wind is a wonderfully readable, often humorous, and always rich story that is ultimately about how we observe the forces of nature and the world around us.

Time Space and Gender in the Nineteenth Century British Diary

In Defining theWind: The Beaufort Scale, and How a 19thCentury Admiral Turned Science into Poetry (New York: Crown,2004), Scott Huler overreads the connection between Beaufort's interest in encyclopedias and lists and thecommercial ...

Author: R. Steinitz

Publisher: Springer

ISBN: 9780230339606

Category: Literary Criticism

Page: 272

View: 145

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Through close examinations of diaries, diary publication, and diaries in fiction, this book explores how the diary's construction of time and space made it an invaluable and effective vehicle for the dominant discourses of the period; it also explains how the genre evolved into the feminine, emotive, private form we continue to privilege today.

Computers in Science and Mathematics Revised Edition

... and household tips, fishing advice, and articles on a variety of other topics. URL: http://www.farmersalmanac.com. Huer, Scott. Defining the Wind: The Beaufort Scale and How a 19th-Century Admiral Turned Science into Poetry.

Author: Robert Plotkin

Publisher: Infobase Holdings, Inc

ISBN: 9781438182759

Category: Science

Page: 204

View: 342

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Computers in Science and Mathematics, Revised Edition examines notable contributions to the advancement of computer technology, as well as the many ways in which scientists and mathematicians use computers in their daily work. This newly revised edition places a focus on the development of computer hardware and software, the theory underlying the design of computer systems, and the use of computers to advance science and mathematics. Computers in Science and Mathematics, Revised Edition also provides a history of computers as scientific and mathematical tools, followed by examples of how computers are used to solve an increasingly wide range of scientific and mathematical problems. Chapters include: Before Computers: Mechanizing Arithmetic, Counting, and Sorting Early Computers: Automating Computation Cryptography: Sending Secret Messages Mathematical Proofs: Computers Find Truth Simulation: Creating Worlds Inside a Computer Weather: Mapping the Past, Predicting the Future Computer-Inspired Biology: Making Computers from Living Things Biology-Inspired Computing: Learning from Nature Recent Developments.

CLASH

A found poem is either treated (significantly changed) or untreated (virtually unchanged from its original order and ... Defining the Wind: The Beaufort Scale, and How a 19th-Century Admiral Turned Science into Poetry—found poetry in ...

Author: Sandra Vavra

Publisher: IAP

ISBN: 9781617355196

Category: Education

Page: 313

View: 223

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This book offers ideas that secondary teachers, university content faculty, and teacher educators can use to challenge traditional literacy practices and demonstrate creative, innovative ways of incorporating new literacies into the classroom, all within a strong theoretical framework. Teachers are trying to catch up to the new challenges of the twenty-first century. It is a superheroic feat that must be achieved if education is to stay relevant and viable. There is a lot of zip, bam, whap, and wow in the fast-paced, social networking, technological world, but not so much in the often laboriously slow-paced educational world. Where is the balance? How do teachers and students learn together, since one group has seasoned wisdom with limited technological know-how and the other uses all the cool new tools, but not in the service of learning? These are some important issues to consider in finding the balance in an unstable, fast-moving, ever-changing world. This book is practical and useful to literacy teachers, teacher educators, and university faculty by bringing together the expertise of composition/rhetoric researchers and writers, literacy specialists, technology specialists, and teachers who are on the cutting edge of new literacies.

Captain Cook

See Henry Woolf, The Transits of Venus: A Study of Eighteenth Century Science (Princeton 1959) which, however, ... Defining the Wind: The Beaufort Scale and How a 19th Century Admiral Turned Science into Poetry (New York 2004) 20.

Author: Frank McLynn

Publisher: Yale University Press

ISBN: 9780300172201

Category: Biography & Autobiography

Page: 490

View: 474

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This “thoroughly researched and sharply opinionated” biography presents a nuanced portrait of the renowned 18th century navigator (The Wall Street Journal). The age of discovery was at its peak in the eighteenth century, with bold adventurers charting the furthest reaches of the globe. Foremost among these explorers was Captain James Cook of the British Royal Navy. Recent writers have viewed Cook through the lens of colonial exploitation, regarding him as a villain. While they raise important issues, many of these critical accounts overlook his major contributions to science, navigation and cartography. In Captain Cook, Frank McLynn re-creates the voyages that took the famous navigator from his native England to the outer reaches of the Pacific Ocean. Although Cook died in a senseless, avoidable conflict with the people of Hawaii, McLynn illustrates that to the men with whom he served, Cook was master of the seas and nothing less than a titan. McLynn reveals Cook's place in history as a brave and brilliant yet tragically flawed man.

The Philosophical Breakfast Club

Four Remarkable Friends Who Transformed Science and Changed the World Laura J. Snyder. Chemical Action of the Solar Rays. ... Defining the Wind: The Beaufort Scale and How a 19th-Century Admiral Turned Science into Poetry.

Author: Laura J. Snyder

Publisher: Crown

ISBN: 9780307716170

Category: Science

Page: 448

View: 318

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“[A] fascinating book...about the way four geniuses at Cambridge University revolutionized modern science.“ —Newsweek The Philosophical Breakfast Club recounts the life and work of four men who met as students at Cambridge University: Charles Babbage, John Herschel, William Whewell, and Richard Jones. Recognizing that they shared a love of science (as well as good food and drink) they began to meet on Sunday mornings to talk about the state of science in Britain and the world at large. Inspired by the great 17th century scientific reformer and political figure Francis Bacon—another former student of Cambridge—the Philosophical Breakfast Club plotted to bring about a new scientific revolution. And to a remarkable extent, they succeeded, even in ways they never intended. Historian of science and philosopher Laura J. Snyder exposes the political passions, religious impulses, friendships, rivalries, and love of knowledge—and power—that drove these extraordinary men. Whewell (who not only invented the word “scientist,” but also founded the fields of crystallography, mathematical economics, and the science of tides), Babbage (a mathematical genius who invented the modern computer), Herschel (who mapped the skies of the Southern Hemisphere and contributed to the invention of photography), and Jones (a curate who shaped the science of economics) were at the vanguard of the modernization of science. This absorbing narrative of people, science and ideas chronicles the intellectual revolution inaugurated by these men, one that continues to mold our understanding of the world around us and of our place within it. Drawing upon the voluminous correspondence between the four men over the fifty years of their work, Laura J. Snyder shows how friendship worked to spur the men on to greater accomplishments, and how it enabled them to transform science and help create the modern world. "The lives and works of these men come across as fit for Masterpiece Theatre.” —Wall Street Journal "Snyder succeeds famously in evoking the excitement, variety and wide-open sense of possibility of the scientific life in 19th-century Britain...splendidly evoked in this engaging book.” —American Scientist "This fine book is as wide-ranging and anecdotal, as excited and exciting, as those long-ago Sunday morning conversations at Cambridge. The Philosophical Breakfast Club forms a natural successor to Jenny Uglow’s The Lunar Men...and Richard Holmes’s The Age of Wonder.” —Washington Post

Weather Matters

Frank H. Bigelow , “ The Formation and Motions of Clouds , ” Popular Science Monthly 60 ( April 1902 ) : 495-502 . ... Scott Huler , Defining the Wind : The Beaufort Scale and How a 19th Century Admiral Turned Science into Poetry ( New ...

Author: Bernard Mergen

Publisher: Culture America (Hardcover)

ISBN: STANFORD:36105131626462

Category: History

Page: 416

View: 270

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A kaleidoscopic book that illuminates our obsession with weather--as both physical reality and evocative metaphor--focusing on the ways in which it is perceived, feared, embraced, managed, and even marketed.

Wind Wizard

Defining the Wind: The Beaufort Scale and How a 19thCentury Admiral Turned Science into Poetry. new York: Crown. International Association for Earthquake Engineering. 1992. Proceedings of the Tenth World Conference on Earthquake ...

Author: Siobhan Roberts

Publisher: Princeton University Press

ISBN: 9781400844708

Category: Technology & Engineering

Page: 288

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How the father of wind engineering helped make the world's most amazing buildings and bridges possible With Wind Wizard, Siobhan Roberts brings us the story of Alan Davenport (1932-2009), the father of modern wind engineering, who investigated how wind navigates the obstacle course of the earth's natural and built environments—and how, when not properly heeded, wind causes buildings and bridges to teeter unduly, sway with abandon, and even collapse. In 1964, Davenport received a confidential telephone call from two engineers requesting tests on a pair of towers that promised to be the tallest in the world. His resulting wind studies on New York's World Trade Center advanced the art and science of wind engineering with one pioneering innovation after another. Establishing the first dedicated "boundary layer" wind tunnel laboratory for civil engineering structures, Davenport enabled the study of the atmospheric region from the earth's surface to three thousand feet, where the air churns with turbulent eddies, the average wind speed increasing with height. The boundary layer wind tunnel mimics these windy marbled striations in order to test models of buildings and bridges that inevitably face the wind when built. Over the years, Davenport's revolutionary lab investigated and improved the wind-worthiness of the world's greatest structures, including the Sears Tower, the John Hancock Tower, Shanghai's World Financial Center, the CN Tower, the iconic Golden Gate Bridge, the Bronx-Whitestone Bridge, the Sunshine Skyway, and the proposed crossing for the Strait of Messina, linking Sicily with mainland Italy. Chronicling Davenport's innovations by analyzing select projects, this popular-science book gives an illuminating behind-the-scenes view into the practice of wind engineering, and insight into Davenport's steadfast belief that there is neither a structure too tall nor too long, as long as it is supported by sound wind science. Some images inside the book are unavailable due to digital copyright restrictions.

Designing Kinetics for Architectural Facades

8 The development of the Beaufort scale in terms of observation is eloquently traced in Huler, S. Defining the Wind: The Beaufort Scale, and How a 19th-Century Admiral Turned Science into Poetry. New York: Random House. 2005.

Author: Jules Moloney

Publisher: Taylor & Francis

ISBN: 9781136709036

Category: Architecture

Page: 244

View: 369

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Architectural facades now have the potential to be literally kinetic, through automated sunscreens and a range of animated surfaces. This book explores the aesthetic potential of these new types of moving facades. Critique of theory and practice in architecture is combined here with ideas from kinetic art of the 1960’s. From this background the basic principles of kinetics are defined and are used to generate experimental computer animations. By classifying the animations, a theory of kinetic form called ‘state change’ is developed. This design research provides a unique and timely resource for those interested in the capacity of kinetics to enliven the public face of architecture. Extra material including animations can be seen at www.kineticarch.net/statechange

Apollo s Fire

Flow of Air Has Shaped Life, Myth, and the Land (Boston: Houghton Mifflin, 1998); Scott Huler, Defining the Wind: The Beaufort Scale, and How a 19th-Century Admiral Turned Science into Poetry (New York: Crown, 2004).

Author: Michael Sims

Publisher: Penguin

ISBN: 9781440654381

Category: Science

Page: 320

View: 827

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It?s the oldest story on Earth. You relive it every day. So much of our shared daily experience in the world is shaped by the sometimes dramatic, sometimes subtle effects of the Earth?s spin, its tilt on its axis, the alternation of light and darkness, the waxing and waning of the moon, the seemingly capricious growth of clouds. The ancient rhythm of the day and night was shaping life on Earth before there were even human beings to appreciate it. It rules our bodies and weather and calendars, and sets the tempo for our work and play. Each of us awakens each day to relive this primordial narrative. With his signature blend of science and poetry, history and mythology, Michael Sims serves as tour guide on an unforgettable journey through the wonders of an ordinary day, from dawn to nighttime. Long before we had the tools of knowledge to explain what we observed in the skies overhead, we built mythologies and folklore around these occurrences, immortalized them in poetry and art, created special places for them in our collective imagination and even our language. In Apollo?s Fire, Sims explores the celestial events that form our days, fusing lively explanations of these phenomena with a richly layered history of what they meant to us before we knew how they worked. He explains the colors of sunrise, the characteristics of shadow, the mysteries of twilight. Characters in this vital drama include Galileo watching sunrise on the moon, Eratosthenes measuring the Earth with a noontime shadow, and Edgar Allan Poe figuring out why the night sky is dark instead of glowing with the light of a million suns. Our story ranges from the movie High Noon to Darwin?s plant experiments, from The Time Machine to the afternoon rise in air pollution.In the witty and elegant style that has earned him the designation ?science raconteur,? Sims weaves a dazzling array of strands into a single tapestry of daily experience- and makes the oldest story on Earth new again.