Concept Formation in the Humanities and the Social Sciences

This difference manifests itself in all spheres of life – in fashion, in everyday life, in the arts, in science. What is of interest for my purposes in this book are its manifestations in the processes of concept formation as they occur ...

Author: T. Pawlowski

Publisher: Springer Science & Business Media

ISBN: 9789400990197

Category: Philosophy

Page: 236

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Uniqueness of style versus plurality of styles: in terms of these aesthetic categories one of the most important differences between the recent past and the present can be described. This difference manifests itself in all spheres of life - in fashion, in everyday life, in the arts, in science. What is of interest for my purposes in this book are its manifestations in the processes of con cept formation as they occur in the humanities, broadly conceived. Here the following methodological approaches seem to dominate the scene. 1. A tendency to apply semiotic concepts in various fields of research. 2. Attempts to introduce metrical concepts and measurement, even into disciplines tra ditionally considered as unamenable to mathematical treatment, like aesthetics and theory of art. 3. Efforts to fmd ways of formulating empirically testable, operational criteria for the application of concepts, especially concepts which refer to objects directly not observable, like dispositions, attitudes, character or personality traits. Care is also taken to take advantage of the conceptual apparatus of methodology to express problems in the humanities with the highest possible degree of clarity and precision. 4. Analysis of the p~rsuasive function oflanguage and its possible uses in science and in everyday life. The above tendencies are present in this book. It is divided into two parts: I. Methods of Concept Formation, and II. Applications. In the first part some general methods of concept formation are presented and their merits discussed.

Concept Formation in the Humanities and the Social Sciences

What is of interest for my purposes in this book are its manifestations in the processes of con cept formation as they occur in the humanities, broadly conceived. Here the following methodological approaches seem to dominate the scene. 1.

Author: T. Pawlowski

Publisher: Springer

ISBN: 9400990219

Category: Philosophy

Page: 236

View: 908

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Uniqueness of style versus plurality of styles: in terms of these aesthetic categories one of the most important differences between the recent past and the present can be described. This difference manifests itself in all spheres of life - in fashion, in everyday life, in the arts, in science. What is of interest for my purposes in this book are its manifestations in the processes of con cept formation as they occur in the humanities, broadly conceived. Here the following methodological approaches seem to dominate the scene. 1. A tendency to apply semiotic concepts in various fields of research. 2. Attempts to introduce metrical concepts and measurement, even into disciplines tra ditionally considered as unamenable to mathematical treatment, like aesthetics and theory of art. 3. Efforts to fmd ways of formulating empirically testable, operational criteria for the application of concepts, especially concepts which refer to objects directly not observable, like dispositions, attitudes, character or personality traits. Care is also taken to take advantage of the conceptual apparatus of methodology to express problems in the humanities with the highest possible degree of clarity and precision. 4. Analysis of the p~rsuasive function oflanguage and its possible uses in science and in everyday life. The above tendencies are present in this book. It is divided into two parts: I. Methods of Concept Formation, and II. Applications. In the first part some general methods of concept formation are presented and their merits discussed.

Concept Formation in Social Science Routledge Revivals

(14) In chapter XI, Semantic Conventions Considered as Social Facts, Ossowski makes the point, abundantly supported by the rest of the book, that 'in the humanities and the social sciences semantic conventions are not normally neutral ...

Author: William Outhwaite

Publisher: Routledge

ISBN: 9781136830778

Category: Philosophy

Page: 182

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First published in 1983, this book examines the problems of concept formation in the social sciences, and in particular sociology, from the standpoint of a realistic philosophy of science. Beginning with a discussion of positivistic, hermeneutic, rationalist and realistic philosophies of science, Dr Outhwaite argues that realism is best able to furnish rational criteria for the choice and specification of social scientific concepts. A realistic philosophy of science therefore acts as his reference point for the dialectical presentation of alternative accounts.

Goethe s History of Science

On the history of concept formation, see Morris Weitz, Theories of Concepts, A History of the Major Philosophical ... Compare studies by Tadeusz Pawlowski, Concept Formation in the Humanities and the Social Sciences (Dordrecht: Reidel, ...

Author: Karl J. Fink

Publisher: Cambridge University Press

ISBN: 9780521402118

Category: History

Page: 262

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Fink explores how Goethe's scientific activities contributed to the growing literature in the history and philosophy of science.

Aesthetic Values

... of defining concepts is analysed by J. Kotarbinska (1960) in 'Ostensive Definition', Philosophy of Science 27. ... in the humanities are discussed in my book: (1980) Concept Formation in the Humanities and the Social Sciences, ...

Author: T. Pawlowski

Publisher: Springer Science & Business Media

ISBN: 9789400924529

Category: Philosophy

Page: 140

View: 517

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What is aesthetic value? A property in an object? An experience of a perceiving person? An ideal object existing in a mysterious sphere, inaccessible to normal cognition? Does it appear in one form only, or in many forms, perhaps infinitely many? Is it something constant, immutable, or rather something susceptible to change, depending on the individual, the cultural milieu, or the epoch? Is a rational defence of aesthetic value judgements possible, or is any discussion of this topic meaningless? The above questions arise out of the most complicated philosophic problems. Volumes have been written on each of them. The discussions which continue over the centuries, the plurality of views and suggested solutions, indicate that all issues are controversial and contestable. Each view can adduce some arguments supporting it; each has some weaknesses. Another source of difficulty is the vagueness and ambiguity of the language in which the problems are discussed. This makes it hard to understand the ideas of particular thinkers and sometimes makes it impossible to decide whether different formulations express the actual divergence of views or only the verbal preferences of their authors. Let us add that this imperfection does not simply spring from inaccuracy on the part of scholars, but also results from the complexity of the problems themselves. The matter is further complicated by important factors of a social character.

Interdisciplinary Research

Concepts answer the what question, that is, what to call the phenomena under investigation. This is the problem of concept formation which lies at the heart of much social science work. Progress in the social sciences occurs, ...

Author: Allen F. Repko

Publisher: SAGE

ISBN: 9781412959155

Category: Social Science

Page: 417

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Introduction to Interdisciplinary Research offers comprehensive treatment of the interdisciplinary research process commonly used by interdisciplinarians. The concise and guided resource on the most commonly accepted interdisciplinary studies principles as applied to the research process covers topics such as: deciding how to choose disciplines relevant to the problem or topi; dealing with disciplinary and ideological bias; making explicit the rationale for taking an interdisciplinary approach, and choosing research methods appropriate to the problem or topic.

Formal Ontology and Conceptual Realism

Philosophy and Grammar. Papers on the Occasion of the Quincentennial of Uppsala University. 1981 ISBN 90-277-1091-0 T. Pawlowski, Concept Formation in the Humanities and the Social Sciences. 1980 ISBN 90-277-1096-1 J. Hintikka, ...

Author: Nino B. Cocchiarella

Publisher: Springer Science & Business Media

ISBN: 9781402062049

Category: Philosophy

Page: 332

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Theories about the ontological structure of the world have generally been described in informal, intuitive terms. This book offers an account of the general features and methodology of formal ontology. The book defends conceptual realism as the best system to adopt based on a logic of natural kinds. By formally reconstructing an intuitive, informal ontological scheme as a formal ontology we can better determine the consistency and adequacy of that scheme.

Reference Truth and Conceptual Schemes

1981 ISBN 90-277-1091–0 T. Pawlowski, Concept Formation in the Humanities and the Social Sciences. 1980 ISBN 90-277-1096-1 J. Hintikka, D. Gruender and E. Agazzi (eds.), Theory Change, Ancient Axiomatics and Galileo's Methodology.

Author: G. Forrai

Publisher: Springer Science & Business Media

ISBN: 9789401728683

Category: Philosophy

Page: 163

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1. HISTORICAL BACKGROUND The purpose of the book is to develop internal realism, the metaphysical-episte mological doctrine initiated by Hilary Putnam (Reason, Truth and History, "Introduction", Many Faces). In doing so I shall rely - sometimes quite heavily - on the notion of conceptual scheme. I shall use the notion in a somewhat idiosyncratic way, which, however, has some affinities with the ways the notion has been used during its history. So I shall start by sketching the history of the notion. This will provide some background, and it will also give opportunity to raise some of the most important problems I will have to solve in the later chapters. The story starts with Kant. Kant thought that the world as we know it, the world of tables, chairs and hippopotami, is constituted in part by the human mind. His cen tral argument relied on an analysis of space and time, and presupposed his famous doctrine that knowledge cannot extend beyond all possible experience. It is a central property of experience - he claimed - that it is structured spatially and temporally. However, for various reasons, space and time cannot be features of the world, as it is independently of our experience. So he concluded that they must be the forms of human sensibility, i. e. necessary ingredients of the way things appear to our senses.

An Architectonic for Science

Tadeusz Pawlowski, Concept Formation in the Humanities and the Social Sciences. 1980. Jaakko Hintikka, David Gruender, and Evandro Agazzi (eds.), Theory Change, Ancient Axiomatics, and Galileo's Methodology. Proceedings of the 1978 Pisa ...

Author: W. Balzer

Publisher: Springer Science & Business Media

ISBN: 9789400937659

Category: Science

Page: 440

View: 445

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This book has grown out of eight years of close collaboration among its authors. From the very beginning we decided that its content should come out as the result of a truly common effort. That is, we did not "distribute" parts of the text planned to each one of us. On the contrary, we made a point that each single paragraph be the product of a common reflection. Genuine team-work is not as usual in philosophy as it is in other academic disciplines. We think, however, that this is more due to the idiosyncrasy of philosophers than to the nature of their subject. Close collaboration with positive results is as rewarding as anything can be, but it may also prove to be quite difficult to implement. In our case, part of the difficulties came from purely geographic separation. This caused unsuspected delays in coordinating the work. But more than this, as time passed, the accumulation of particular results and ideas outran our ability to fit them into an organic unity. Different styles of exposition, different ways of formalization, different levels of complexity were simultaneously present in a voluminous manuscript that had become completely unmanageable. In particular, a portion of the text had been conceived in the language of category theory and employed ideas of a rather abstract nature, while another part was expounded in the more conventional set-theoretic style, stressing intui tivity and concreteness.

Concepts in Law

definition was not supposed to alter the conditions under which legal consequences occur and, as before, ... of Concept Formation, 6; T. Pawlowski, Concept Formation in the Humanities and Social Sciences (Dordrecht 1980) 48.

Author: Jaap C. Hage

Publisher: Springer Science & Business Media

ISBN: 9789048129829

Category: Philosophy

Page: 129

View: 703

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During the last decades, legal theory has focused almost completely on norms, rules and arguments as the constitutive elements of law. Concepts were mostly neglected. The contributions to this volume try to remedy this neglect by elucidating the role concepts play in law from different perspectives. A main aim of this volume is to initiate a debate about concepts in law. Åke Frändberg gives an overview of the many different uses of concepts in law and shows amongst others that concepts in the law should not be confused with the role of concepts in descriptions of the law. Dietmar von der Pfordten criticizes the restriction to norms as parts of the law in contemporary legal theory by questioning what concepts are and what their function is, both in general and in legal conceptual schemes. Giovanni Sartor assumes the inferential analysis of meaning proposed by Alf Ross in his ground breaking paper Tû-tû and addresses the question how possession of a concept, including the rules defining it, is possible without endorsing these rules. Jaap Hage argues that 1. legal status words such as 'owner' have a meaning because they denote things or relations in institutional reality, 2. the meaning of these words consists in this denotation relation, 3. knowledge of this meaning presupposes knowledge of the rules governing these words. Torben Spaak contributes to this volume with an exemplary analysis of one of the most central concepts of the law, namely that of a legal power. Lorenz Kähler discusses the role of concepts in determining the scope of application of legal rules and raises from this perspective the question to what extent legal concept formation can be arbitrary. Ralf Poscher argues that as soon as a concept is used in stating the law, the precise scope of application of this concept has become a legal matter. This means that the use of ‘moral’ concepts in the law does not automatically lead to a moral import into the law. Dennis Patterson holds that Hart’s concept of law can be understood as a so-called ‘practice theory’ and provides an overview of such a theory.