Chinese Martial Arts Cinema

As an entry point into this process, I propose to follow the method used by Chinese critics of differentiating between wuxia and kung fu – two intersecting cinematic genres which for all their similarities have separate specificities ...

Author: Stephen Teo

Publisher: Edinburgh University Press

ISBN: 9781474403887

Category: Performing Arts

Page: 240

View: 249

DOWNLOAD →

This is the first comprehensive, fully-researched account of the historical and contemporary development of the traditional martial arts genre in the Chinese cinema known as wuxia (literal translation: martial chivalry) - a genre which audiences around the world became familiar with through the phenomenal 'crossover' hit Crouching Tiger, Hidden Dragon (2000). The book unveils rich layers of the wuxia tradition as it developed in the early Shanghai cinema in the late 1920s, and from the 1950s onwards, in the Hong Kong and Taiwan film industries. Key attractions of the book are analyses of:*The history of the tradition as it began in the Shanghai cinema, its rise and popularity as a serialized form in the silent cinema of the late 1920s, and its eventual prohibition by the government in 1931.*The fantastic characteristics of the genre, their relationship with folklore, myth and religion, and their similarities and differences with the kung fu sub-genre of martial arts cinema.*The protagonists and heroes of the genre, in particular the figure of the female knight-errant.*The chief personalities and masterpieces of the genre - directors such as King Hu, Chu Yuan, Zhang Che, Ang Lee, Zhang Yimou, and films such as Come Drink With Me (1966), The One-Armed Swordsman (1967), A Touch of Zen (1970-71), Hero (2002), House of Flying Daggers (2004), and Curse of the Golden Flower (2006).

The Martial Arts Cinema of the Chinese Diaspora

Sammo Hung and Jackie Chan, have worked to integrate Northern styles with slapstick comedy, and their films have given kung-fu cinema its biggest successes since the death of Bruce Lee. (“Development” 35) The precision, kinetic power, ...

Author: Kin-Yan Szeto

Publisher: SIU Press

ISBN: 9780809386208

Category: Performing Arts

Page: 171

View: 966

DOWNLOAD →

In The Martial Arts Cinema of the Chinese Diaspora, Kin-Yan Szeto critically examines three of the most internationally famous martial arts film artists to arise out of the Chinese diaspora and travel far from their homelands to find commercial success in the world at large: Ang Lee, John Woo, and Jackie Chan. Positing the idea that these filmmakers' success is evidence of a "cosmopolitical awareness" arising from their cross-cultural ideological engagements and geopolitical displacements, Szeto demonstrates how this unique perspective allows these three filmmakers to develop and act in the transnational environment of media production, distribution, and consumption. Beginning with a historical retrospective on Chinese martial arts films as a diasporic film genre and the transnational styles and ideologies of the filmmakers themselves, Szeto uses case studies to explore in depth how the forces of colonialism, Chinese nationalism, and Western imperialism shaped the identities and work of Lee, Woo, and Chan. Addressed in the volume is the groundbreaking martial arts swordplay film that achieves global success-Ang Lee's Crouching Tiger, Hidden Dragon- and its revelations about Hollywood representations of Asians, as well as concepts of male and female masculinity in the swordplay film tradition. Also investigated is the invigoration of contemporary gangster, thriller, and war films by John Woo, whose combination of artistic and historical contexts has contributed to his global success. Szeto then dissects Chan's mimetic representation of masculinity in his films, and the influences of his Chinese theater and martial arts training on his work. Szeto outlines the similarities and differences between the three artists' films, especially their treatments of gender, sexuality, and power. She concludes by analyzing their films as metaphors for their working conditions in the Chinese diaspora and Hollywood, and demonstrating how through their works, Lee, Woo, and Chan communicate not only with the rest of the world but also with each other. Far from a book simply about three filmmakers, The Martial Arts Cinema of the Chinese Diaspora investigates the transnational nature of films, the geopolitics of culture and race, and the depths of masculinity and power in movies. Szeto's interdisciplinary approach calls for nothing less than a paradigm shift in the study of Chinese diasporic filmmakers and the embodiment of cosmopolitical perspectives in the martial arts genre.

Chinese Martial Arts and Media Culture

martial arts cinema and the readership of jianghu to a global context. This subsequently brings about the globalization of Chinese martial arts cinema in terms of the broadening of target audiences, the influx of overseas investment, ...

Author: Tim Trausch

Publisher: Rowman & Littlefield

ISBN: 9781786609038

Category: Social Science

Page: 238

View: 203

DOWNLOAD →

Signs and images of the Chinese martial arts genre are increasingly included in the media of global popular culture. As tropes of martial arts are not restricted to what is constructed as one medium, one region, or one (sub)genre, neither are the essays in this collection.

Martial Arts Cinema and Hong Kong Modernity

meanings embedded in the cultural nationalist discourse of the martial arts film are by no means fixed or static; ... See Hu, Projecting a Nation, chapter 3; and Stephen Teo, Chinese Martial Arts Cinema: The Wuxia Tradition, 2nd ed.

Author: Man-Fung Yip

Publisher: Hong Kong University Press

ISBN: 9789888390717

Category: Performing Arts

Page: 240

View: 391

DOWNLOAD →

At the core of Martial Arts Cinema and Hong Kong Modernity: Aesthetics, Representation, Circulation is a fascinating paradox: the martial arts film, long regarded as a vehicle of Chinese cultural nationalism, can also be understood as a mass cultural expression of Hong Kong’s modern urban-industrial society. This important and popular genre, Man-Fung Yip argues, articulates the experiential qualities, the competing social subjectivities and gender discourses, as well as the heightened circulation of capital, people, goods, information, and technologies in Hong Kong of the 1960s and 1970s. In addition to providing a novel conceptual framework for the study of Hong Kong martial arts cinema and shedding light on the nexus between social change and cultural/aesthetic form, this book offers perceptive analyses of individual films, including not only the canonical works of King Hu, Chang Cheh, and Bruce Lee, but also many lesser-known ones by Lau Kar-leung and Chor Yuen, among others, that have not been adequately discussed before. Thoroughly researched and lucidly written, Yip’s stimulating study will ignite debates in new directions for both scholars and fans of Chinese-language martial arts cinema. “Yip subjects critical clichés to rigorous examination, moving beyond generalized notions of martial arts cinema’s appeal and offering up informed scrutiny of every facet of the genre. He has the ability to encapsulate these films’ particularities with cogent examples and, at the same time, demonstrate a thorough familiarity with the historical context in which this endlessly fascinating genre arose.” —David Desser, professor emeritus, University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign “Eschewing a reductive chronology, Yip offers a persuasive, detailed, and sophisticated excavation of martial arts cinema which is read through and in relation to rapid transformation of Hong Kong in the 1960s and 1970s. An exemplar of critical genre study, this book represents a significant contribution to the discipline.” —Yvonne Tasker, professor of film studies and dean of the Faculty of Arts and Humanities, University of East Anglia

Chinese Martial Arts Cinema

New for this edition - An additional chapter, which takes into account the recent developments in martial arts cinema including both king fu and wuxia - Explores how kung fu and wuxia are becoming more interlinked - Includes analysis of new ...

Author: Professor Stephen (Nanyang Technological University) Teo

Publisher:

ISBN: 1474403867

Category:

Page: 240

View: 800

DOWNLOAD →

This is the first comprehensive, fully-researched account of the historical and contemporary development of the traditional martial arts genre in the Chinese cinema known as wuxia (literal translation: martial chivalry) - a genre which audiences around the world became familiar with through the phenomenal 'crossover' hit Crouching Tiger, Hidden Dragon (2000). The book unveils rich layers of the wuxia tradition as it developed in the early Shanghai cinema in the late 1920s, and from the 1950s onwards, in the Hong Kong and Taiwan film industries. Key attractions of the book are analyses of:*The history of the tradition as it began in the Shanghai cinema, its rise and popularity as a serialized form in the silent cinema of the late 1920s, and its eventual prohibition by the government in 1931.*The fantastic characteristics of the genre, their relationship with folklore, myth and religion, and their similarities and differences with the kung fu sub-genre of martial arts cinema.*The protagonists and heroes of the genre, in particular the figure of the female knight-errant.*The chief personalities and masterpieces of the genre - directors such as King Hu, Chu Yuan, Zhang Che, Ang Lee, Zhang Yimou, and films such as Come Drink With Me (1966), The One-Armed Swordsman (1967), A Touch of Zen (1970-71), Hero (2002), House of Flying Daggers (2004), and Curse of the Golden Flower (2006).

The Chinese Cinema Book

But we should know better by now than to count out the Chinese martial arts star too quickly. These Dragons are forever. NotesNotes 1. Stephen Teo, Chinese Martial Arts Cinema: The Wuxia Tradition (Edinburgh: Edinburgh University Press ...

Author: Song Hwee Lim

Publisher: Bloomsbury Publishing

ISBN: 9781911239543

Category: Performing Arts

Page: 336

View: 432

DOWNLOAD →

This revised and updated new edition provides a comprehensive introduction to the history of cinema in mainland China, Hong Kong and Taiwan, as well as to disaporic and transnational Chinese film-making, from the beginnings of cinema to the present day. Chapters by leading international scholars are grouped in thematic sections addressing key historical periods, film movements, genres, stars and auteurs, and the industrial and technological contexts of cinema in Greater China.

Fighting without Fighting

Kung Fu Cinema's Journey to the West Luke White ... 1 Hong Kong's Martial Arts Cinema 1 David Desser, 'The Kung Fu Craze: Hong Kong Cinema's First Reception', ... Stephen Teo, Chinese Martial Arts Cinema: The Wuxia Tradition ...

Author: Luke White

Publisher: Reaktion Books

ISBN: 9781789145342

Category: Performing Arts

Page: 336

View: 779

DOWNLOAD →

From classic Bruce Lee films to the comedies of Jackie Chan, a vibrant look at the enduring fascination with the kung fu cinema of Hong Kong. In the spring and summer of 1973, a wave of martial arts movies from Hong Kong—epitomized by Bruce Lee’s Enter the Dragon—smashed box-office records for foreign-language films in America and ignited a “kung fu craze” that swept the world. Fighting without Fighting explores this dramatic phenomenon, and it argues that, more than just a cinematic fad, the West’s sudden fascination with—and moral panic about—the Asian fighting arts left lasting legacies still present today. The book traces the background of the craze in the longer development of Hong Kong’s martial arts cinema. It discusses the key films in detail, as well as their popular reception and the debates they ignited, where kung fu challenged Western identities and raised anxieties about violence, both on and off-screen. And it examines the proliferation of ideas and images from these films in fields as diverse as popular music, superhero franchises, children’s cartoons, and contemporary art. Illuminating and accessible, Fighting without Fighting draws a vivid bridge between East and West.

China s Encounter with Global Hollywood

Here i want to clarify the term “Chinese martial arts cinema.” First, scholars in the field of Chinese film studies have long raised the question of nation, cultural identity, and transnational cinema. some researchers have used ...

Author: Wendy Su

Publisher: University Press of Kentucky

ISBN: 9780813167084

Category: Business & Economics

Page: 243

View: 962

DOWNLOAD →

This work explores the global-local interplay through the case study of the People's Republic of China's encounter with global Hollywood from the mid-1990s to 2013. It analyzes the changing role of the Chinese state and its evolving cultural policy; investigates the intertwined relationships among the Chinese state, global capital, and local dynamics; and examines the impact of this encounter on the Chinese film sector's radical transformation from a Soviet-style planned economy and state ownership model to a market-oriented cultural industry.

A Brief History of the Martial Arts

East Asian Fighting Styles, from Kung Fu to Ninjutsu Jonathan Clements ... Teo, Chinese Martial Arts Cinema, pp.61–4 Clouse, The Making of Enter the Dragon, p.17. Reid, The Ultimate Guide to Martial Arts Movies of the 1970s, p.98.

Author: Jonathan Clements

Publisher: Hachette UK

ISBN: 9781472136473

Category: History

Page: 304

View: 341

DOWNLOAD →

'If I had to pick a single general martial arts history book in English, I would recommend A Brief History of the Martial Arts by Dr Jonathan Clements' RICHARD BEITLICH, Martial History Team blog From Shaolin warrior monks to the movies of Bruce Lee, a new history of the evolution of East Asian styles of unarmed combat, from Kung Fu to Ninjutsu Folk tales of the Shaolin Temple depict warrior monks with superhuman abilities. Today, dozens of East Asian fighting styles trace their roots back to the Buddhist brawlers of Shaolin, although any quest for the true story soon wanders into a labyrinth of forgeries, secret texts and modern retellings. This new study approaches the martial arts from their origins in military exercises and callisthenics. It examines a rich folklore from old wuxia tales of crime-fighting heroes to modern kung fu movies. Centre stage is given to the stories that martial artists tell themselves about themselves, with accounts (both factual and fictional) of famous practitioners including China's Yim Wing-chun, Wong Fei-hong, and Ip Man, as well as Japanese counterparts such as Kano Jigoro, Itosu Anko and So Doshin. The history of martial arts encompasses secret societies and religious rebels, with intimate glimpses of the histories of China, Korea and Japan, their conflicts and transformations. The book also charts the migration of martial arts to the United States and beyond. Special attention is paid to the turmoil of the twentieth century, the cross-cultural influence of Japanese colonies in Asia, and the post-war rise of martial arts in sport and entertainment - including the legacy of Bruce Lee, the dilemma of the ninja and the global audience for martial arts in fiction.

Race and Racism in Modern East Asia

In the world of martial arts cinema, the human desire for or fantasy of physical prowess has not changed regardless of the ... Though only for a fleeting moment, the Ip Man films provide many viewers, especially Chinese males, ...

Author: Rotem Kowner

Publisher: BRILL

ISBN: 9789004292932

Category: Social Science

Page: 674

View: 609

DOWNLOAD →

Race and Racism in Modern East Asia (Vol. 2) examines in depth interactions between Western and local constructions of race. This insightful 23-chapter volume offers a sweeping analysis of issues of race, racism, nationalism and gender in the region that is unsurpassed in previous scholarship.