Captain James Cook and the Search for Antarctica

Using Cook’s journals and the logbooks of officers who sailed with him, this volume sets his Antarctic explorations within the context of his historic voyages.

Author: James C. Hamilton

Publisher: Pen and Sword History

ISBN: 9781526753588

Category: Biography & Autobiography

Page: 316

View: 428

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Two hundred and fifty years ago Captain James Cook, during his extraordinary voyages of navigation and maritime exploration, searched for Antarctica – the Unknown Southern Continent. During parts of his three voyages in the southern Pacific and Southern Oceans, Cook ‘narrowed the options’ for the location of Antarctica. Over three summers, he completed a circumnavigation of portions of the Southern Continent, encountering impenetrable barriers of ice, and he suggested the continent existed, a frozen land not populated by a living soul. Yet his Antarctic voyages are perhaps the least studied of all his remarkable travels. That is why James Hamilton’s gripping and scholarly study, which brings together the stories of Cook’s Antarctic journeys into a single volume, is such an original and timely addition to the literature on Cook and eighteenth-century exploration. Using Cook's journals and the log books of officers who sailed with him, the book sets his Antarctic explorations within the context of his historic voyages. The main focus is on the Second Voyage (1772-1775), but brief episodes in the First Voyage (during 1769) and the Third Voyage (1776) are part of the story. Throughout the narrative Cook’s exceptional seamanship and navigational skills, and that of his crew, are displayed during often-difficult passages in foul weather across uncharted and inhospitable seas. Captain James Cook and the Search for Antarctica offers the reader a fascinating insight into Cook the seaman and explorer, and it will be essential reading for anyone who has a particular interest the history of the Southern Continent.

Captain James Cook and the Search for Antarctica

Hamilton, James C., 'Cook's Crossing of the Antarctic Circle – Part I', Cook's Log, Vol. 38, No. ... O'Sullivan, Dan, In Search of Captain Cook, Exploring the Man Through His Own Words (I.B. Tarus & Company, London: 2008).

Author: James C Hamilton

Publisher: Pen and Sword History

ISBN: 9781526753601

Category: History

Page: 320

View: 470

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Two hundred and fifty years ago Captain James Cook, during his extraordinary voyages of navigation and maritime exploration, searched for Antarctica – the Unknown Southern Continent. During parts of his three voyages in the southern Pacific and Southern Oceans, Cook ‘narrowed the options’ for the location of Antarctica. Over three summers, he completed a circumnavigation of portions of the Southern Continent, encountering impenetrable barriers of ice, and he suggested the continent existed, a frozen land not populated by a living soul. Yet his Antarctic voyages are perhaps the least studied of all his remarkable travels. That is why James Hamilton’s gripping and scholarly study, which brings together the stories of Cook’s Antarctic journeys into a single volume, is such an original and timely addition to the literature on Cook and eighteenth-century exploration. Using Cook's journals and the log books of officers who sailed with him, the book sets his Antarctic explorations within the context of his historic voyages. The main focus is on the Second Voyage (1772-1775), but brief episodes in the First Voyage (during 1769) and the Third Voyage (1776) are part of the story. Throughout the narrative Cook’s exceptional seamanship and navigational skills, and that of his crew, are displayed during often-difficult passages in foul weather across uncharted and inhospitable seas. Captain James Cook and the Search for Antarctica offers the reader a fascinating insight into Cook the seaman and explorer, and it will be essential reading for anyone who has a particular interest the history of the Southern Continent.

Captain Cook

This title introduces readers to Captain Cook, the great explorer who mapped thousands of miles of uncharted territory.

Author: Jim Ollhoff

Publisher: ABDO

ISBN: 9781617839658

Category: Juvenile Nonfiction

Page: 34

View: 781

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This title introduces readers to Captain Cook, the great explorer who mapped thousands of miles of uncharted territory. Cook?s life story is examined from his childhood to his marriage and his service in the Royal Navy. Early influences are covered including Cook?s development as an astronomer. Cook?s journeys on the Endeavor and Resolution are covered, including the search for the Terra Australis Incognita and the Northwest Passage. Aligned to Common Core Standards and correlated to state standards. ABDO & Daughters is an imprint of ABDO Publishing Company.

The Journals of Captain James Cook on his Voyages of Discovery

The volume and vitality of the records, both textual and graphic, for this voyage surpass those even for Cook’s second voyage.

Author: J.C. Beaglehole

Publisher: Routledge

ISBN: 9781351543187

Category: History

Page: 976

View: 357

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Captain James Cook’s first two voyages of exploration, in 1768-71 and 1772-75, had drawn the modern map of the South Pacific Ocean and had opened the door on the discovery of Antarctica. These expeditions were the subject of Volumes I and II of Dr J.C. Beaglehole’s edition of Cook’s Journals. The third voyage, on which Cook sailed in 1776, was directed to the Northern Hemisphere. Its objective was the discovery of ’a Northern Passage by sea from the Pacific to the Atlantic Ocean’ - the North-west Passage, sought since the 16th century, which would have transformed the pattern of world trade. The search was to take Cook into high latitudes where, as in the Antarctic, his skill in ice navigation was tested. Sailing north from Tahiti in 1778, Cook made the first recorded discovery of the Hawaiian Islands. On March 7 he sighted the Oregon coast in 44° N. The remarkable voyage which he made northward along the Canadian and Alaskan coasts and through Bering Strait to his farthest north in 70° nearly disproved the existence of a navigable passage towards the Atlantic and produced charts of impressive accuracy. Returning to Hawaii to refit, Cook met his death in a clash with the natives as tragic as it seems unnecessary. Dr Beaglehole discusses, with sympathy and insight, the tensions which led Cook, by then a tired man, into miscalculations alien to his own nature and habits. The volume and vitality of the records, both textual and graphic, for this voyage surpass those even for Cook’s second voyage. The surgeons William Anderson and David Samwell, both admirable observers, left journals which are also here printed in full for the first time. The documentation is completed, as in the previous volumes, by appendixes of documents and correspondence and by reproductions of original drawings and paintings mainly by John Webber, the artist of the expedition. In Dr Beaglehole’s words, ’no one can study attentively the records of Cook’s third, and last, v

The Journals of Captain James Cook on his Voyages of Discovery

These expeditions were the subject of Volumes I and II of Dr J.C. Beaglehole?s edition of Cook?s Journals. The third voyage, on which Cook sailed in 1776, was directed to the Northern Hemisphere.

Author: J.C. Beaglehole

Publisher: Routledge

ISBN: 9781351543217

Category: History

Page: 1399

View: 365

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Captain James Cook?s first two voyages of exploration, in 1768-71 and 1772-75, had drawn the modern map of the South Pacific Ocean and had opened the door on the discovery of Antarctica. These expeditions were the subject of Volumes I and II of Dr J.C. Beaglehole?s edition of Cook?s Journals. The third voyage, on which Cook sailed in 1776, was directed to the Northern Hemisphere. Its objective was the discovery of ?a Northern Passage by sea from the Pacific to the Atlantic Ocean? - the North-west Passage, sought since the 16th century, which would have transformed the pattern of world trade. The search was to take Cook into high latitudes where, as in the Antarctic, his skill in ice navigation was tested. Sailing north from Tahiti in 1778, Cook made the first recorded discovery of the Hawaiian Islands. On March 7 he sighted the Oregon coast in 44° N. The remarkable voyage which he made northward along the Canadian and Alaskan coasts and through Bering Strait to his farthest north in 70° nearly disproved the existence of a navigable passage towards the Atlantic and produced charts of impressive accuracy. Returning to Hawaii to refit, Cook met his death in a clash with the natives as tragic as it seems unnecessary. Dr Beaglehole discusses, with sympathy and insight, the tensions which led Cook, by then a tired man, into miscalculations alien to his own nature and habits. The volume and vitality of the records, both textual and graphic, for this voyage surpass those even for Cook?s second voyage. The surgeons William Anderson and David Samwell, both admirable observers, left journals which are also here printed in full for the first time. The documentation is completed, as in the previous volumes, by appendixes of documents and correspondence and by reproductions of original drawings and paintings mainly by John Webber, the artist of the expedition. In Dr Beaglehole?s words, ?no one can study attentively the records of Cook?s third, and last, v

The Journals of Captain James Cook on his Voyages of Discovery

The volume and vitality of the records, both textual and graphic, for this voyage surpass those even for Cook’s second voyage.

Author: J.C. Beaglehole

Publisher: Routledge

ISBN: 9781351543248

Category: History

Page: 1711

View: 324

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Captain James Cook’s first two voyages of exploration, in 1768-71 and 1772-75, had drawn the modern map of the South Pacific Ocean and had opened the door on the discovery of Antarctica. These expeditions were the subject of Volumes I and II of Dr J.C. Beaglehole’s edition of Cook’s Journals. The third voyage, on which Cook sailed in 1776, was directed to the Northern Hemisphere. Its objective was the discovery of ’a Northern Passage by sea from the Pacific to the Atlantic Ocean’ - the North-west Passage, sought since the 16th century, which would have transformed the pattern of world trade. The search was to take Cook into high latitudes where, as in the Antarctic, his skill in ice navigation was tested. Sailing north from Tahiti in 1778, Cook made the first recorded discovery of the Hawaiian Islands. On March 7 he sighted the Oregon coast in 44° N. The remarkable voyage which he made northward along the Canadian and Alaskan coasts and through Bering Strait to his farthest north in 70° nearly disproved the existence of a navigable passage towards the Atlantic and produced charts of impressive accuracy. Returning to Hawaii to refit, Cook met his death in a clash with the natives as tragic as it seems unnecessary. Dr Beaglehole discusses, with sympathy and insight, the tensions which led Cook, by then a tired man, into miscalculations alien to his own nature and habits. The volume and vitality of the records, both textual and graphic, for this voyage surpass those even for Cook’s second voyage. The surgeons William Anderson and David Samwell, both admirable observers, left journals which are also here printed in full for the first time. The documentation is completed, as in the previous volumes, by appendixes of documents and correspondence and by reproductions of original drawings and paintings mainly by John Webber, the artist of the expedition. In Dr Beaglehole’s words, ’no one can study attentively the records of Cook’s third, and last, v

Antarcticness

'The tourist and economic significance of Antarctic travel in Australian and New Zealand Antarctic gateway cities'. Tourism and Hospitality Research 2(2): 157–69. Hamilton, James. 2020. Captain James Cook and the Search for Antarctica.

Author: Ilan Kelman

Publisher: UCL Press

ISBN: 9781800081444

Category: Social Science

Page: 336

View: 767

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Antarcticness joins disciplines, communication approaches and ideas to explore meanings and depictions of Antarctica. Personal and professional words in poetry and prose, plus images, present and represent Antarctica, as presumed and as imagined, alongside what is experienced around the continent and by those watching from afar. These understandings explain how the Antarctic is viewed and managed while identifying aspects which should be more prominent in policy and practice. The authors and artists place Antarctica, and the perceptions and knowledge through Antarcticness, within inspirations and imaginations, without losing sight of the multiple interests pushing the continent’s governance as it goes through rapid political and environmental changes. Given the diversity and disparity of the influences and changes, the book’s contributions connect to provide a more coherent and encompassing perspective of how society views Antarctica, scientifically and artistically, and what the continent provides and could provide politically, culturally and environmentally. Offering original research, art and interpretations of different experiences and explorations of Antarctica, explanations meld with narratives while academic analyses overlap with first-hand experiences of what Antarctica does and does not – could and could not – bring to the world.

Captain Cook

Now Vanessa Collingridge, his distant cousin, unravels the strange tale of history's most fascinating explorer and the man who sought to dethrone him.

Author: Vanessa Collingridge

Publisher: Random House

ISBN: 9780091888985

Category: Australia

Page: 482

View: 195

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A uniquely woven story encompassing three separate centuries and three different lives. Captain Cook, best known for his heroic voyages through the Pacific Ocean, is brought to life in vivid detail. We follow his humble beginnings as the son of a farm labourer, through his convention-shattering treatment of the indigenous groups he met on his travels, and then onto his final tragic voyage which signalled the end of his revered reputation. One hundred years on from the death of Cook, another great man, George Collingridge begins his own adventure. He, like Cook was oblivious to the implications his journey would have. Along the way he unfolds ancient maps, secret tales and unearths hidden lands and buried treasure. He is also said to have realised that it was not Cook who discovered Australia - it was the Portugese. This firm belief was the eventual cause of his self-destruction. Another hundred years later Vanessa Collingridge, is searching for books on her lifelong hero Captain Cook in a university library. She discovers the name of a distant cousin, George Collingridge, in a dusty card index. And so a new journey of discovery begins - in the footsteps of her hero and his nemesis.

The Race to the South Pole

Captain James Cook and his crew got very close to Antarctica between 1772 and 1775. ... Whale and Seal Hunting One reason many people fought the extreme cold of the Antarctic Circle was in search of whales and seals, which were hunted ...

Author: Ryan Nagelhout

Publisher: Gareth Stevens Publishing LLLP

ISBN: 9781482420425

Category: Juvenile Nonfiction

Page: 34

View: 333

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In 1911, two teams headed to the southernmost point on Earth: the South Pole. No one had ever been there before, and at the end of the race, not everyone would live to tell the tale. Readers go exploring with Norwegian adventurer Roald Amundsen and his team as they head south in competition with English explorer Robert Scott. Details of their adventures, full-color photographs, and the description of the impact of their perilous journey show readers what is possible with training, will, and courage.