Can Death Be a Harm to the Person Who Dies

The purpose of this book is to justify the claim that death (being dead) can be a harm to the person who dies. In his argument, Epicurus concludes that 'death' (in his sense) cannot be a harm to the person who dies.

Author: J. Li

Publisher: Springer Science & Business Media

ISBN: 9789401598682

Category: Philosophy

Page: 198

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lt is with great pleasure that I write this preface for Or Li's book, wh ich addresses the venerable and vexing issues surrounding the problem of whether death can be a harm to the person who dies. This problem is an ancient one which was raised long ago by the early Greek philosopher Epicurus, who notoriously argued that death is at no time a harm to its 'victim' because before death there is no harrn and after death there is no victim. Epicurus's conclusion is conspicuously at odds with our prereflective and in most cases our post-reflective-intuitions, and numerous strategies have therefore been proposed to refute or avoid the Epicurean conclusion that death cannot be an evil after all. How then are we to account for our intuition that death is not just an evil, but perhaps the worst evil: that may befall us? This is the key issue that Or Li addresses. Or Li's book explores various alternative approaches to the complex and difficult issues surrounding Epicurus's notorious argument and provides a defence ofthe intuitively plausible conclusion that death can indeed be a harm to the person who dies. This challenge to Epicurus's claim that death is never a harm to the person who dies is developed by way of a detailed exploration of the issues raised not only by Epicurus, but also by his many successors, who have responded variously to the challenging issues which Epicurus raised.

Can Death Be a Harm to the Person Who Dies

How then are we to account for our intuition that death is not just an evil, but perhaps the worst evil: that may befall us? This is the key issue that Or Li addresses.

Author: J. Li

Publisher: Springer

ISBN: 9048159733

Category: Philosophy

Page: 198

View: 216

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lt is with great pleasure that I write this preface for Or Li's book, wh ich addresses the venerable and vexing issues surrounding the problem of whether death can be a harm to the person who dies. This problem is an ancient one which was raised long ago by the early Greek philosopher Epicurus, who notoriously argued that death is at no time a harm to its 'victim' because before death there is no harrn and after death there is no victim. Epicurus's conclusion is conspicuously at odds with our prereflective and in most cases our post-reflective-intuitions, and numerous strategies have therefore been proposed to refute or avoid the Epicurean conclusion that death cannot be an evil after all. How then are we to account for our intuition that death is not just an evil, but perhaps the worst evil: that may befall us? This is the key issue that Or Li addresses. Or Li's book explores various alternative approaches to the complex and difficult issues surrounding Epicurus's notorious argument and provides a defence ofthe intuitively plausible conclusion that death can indeed be a harm to the person who dies. This challenge to Epicurus's claim that death is never a harm to the person who dies is developed by way of a detailed exploration of the issues raised not only by Epicurus, but also by his many successors, who have responded variously to the challenging issues which Epicurus raised.

Death Posthumous Harm and Bioethics

This version of the Hedonic Variant of the Epicurean argument that death cannot be a harm to the person who dies is similar to that developed by Stephen E. Rosenbaum: (A) A state of affairs is bad for person P only if P can experience ...

Author: James Stacey Taylor

Publisher: Routledge

ISBN: 9781136257759

Category: Philosophy

Page: 244

View: 269

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Death, Posthumous Harm, and Bioethics offers a highly distinctive and original approach to the metaphysics of death and applies this approach to contemporary debates in bioethics that address end-of-life and post-mortem issues. Taylor defends the controversial Epicurean view that death is not a harm to the person who dies and the neo-Epicurean thesis that persons cannot be affected by events that occur after their deaths, and hence that posthumous harms (and benefits) are impossible. He then extends this argument by asserting that the dead cannot be wronged, finally presenting a defence of revisionary views concerning posthumous organ procurement.

Saving People from the Harm of Death

But from the fact that horrible music is neutral to a deaf person, it does not follow that losing one's hearing is neutral. After all, losing a sense will ... This is certainly part of what makes death bad for the person who dies.

Author: Espen Gamlund

Publisher: Oxford University Press

ISBN: 9780190921422

Category: Philosophy

Page: 288

View: 985

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Death is something we mourn or fear as the worst thing that could happen--whether the deaths of close ones, the deaths of strangers in reported accidents or tragedies, or our own. And yet, being dead is something that no one can experience and live to describe. This simple truth raises a host of difficult philosophical questions about the negativity surrounding our sense of death, and how and for whom exactly it is harmful. The question of whether death is bad has occupied philosophers for centuries, and the debate emerging in philosophical literature is referred to as the "badness of death." Are deaths primarily negative for the survivors, or does death also affect the deceased? What are the differences between death in fetal life, just after birth, or in adolescence? In order to properly evaluate deaths in global health, we must find answers to these questions. In this volume, leading philosophers, medical doctors, and economists discuss different views on how to evaluate death and its relevance for health policy. This includes theories about the harm of death and its connections to population-level bioethics. For example, one of the standard views in global health is that newborn deaths are among the worst types of death, yet stillbirths are neglected. This raises difficult questions about why birth is so significant, and several of the book's authors challenge this standard view. This is the first volume to connect philosophical discussions on the harm of death with discussions on population health, adjusting the ways in which death is evaluated. Changing these evaluations has consequences for how we prioritize different health programs that affect individuals at different ages, as well as how we understand inequality in health.

Philosophy in The Twilight Zone

are not harmed by our own deaths , for “ when we are , death is not come . ” Furthermore , notes Epicurus , when we are actually dead we will suffer from “ no annoyance . ” This is because , for Epicurus , when we die we cease to exist ...

Author: Noël Carroll

Publisher: Wiley-Blackwell

ISBN: UOM:39015080843173

Category: Performing Arts

Page: 212

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Utilizing a series of essays examining the broad philosophical concepts embedded in the first 156 episodes of Rod Serling's series, 'The Twilight Zone', this book provides a platform for further philosophical discussion.

Life Before Birth

But how , it may be asked , can an event that occurs after a person ' s death harm the living person he was before he died ? How can an event that occurs at one time cause harm to someone living at an earlier time ?

Author: Bonnie Steinbock

Publisher: Oxford University Press, USA

ISBN: UOM:39015021552495

Category: Psychology

Page: 312

View: 622

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The legalization of abortion itself was based in part on the unborn's never having been recognized in law as a full legal person. Yet fetuses have been considered as persons for the purposes of insurance coverage, wrongful death suits, and vehicular homicide. This book provides a framework for thinking clearly and coherently about the unborn. The first chapter elaborates the book's basic idea, that all and only beings who have interests have moral standing, and only beings who possess conscious awareness have interests. This thesis, which is called "the interest view," raises issues of considerable philosophical complexity, but is presented in language non-philosophers will be able to understand.

The Oxford Handbook of Philosophy of Death

If our notion of harm is that broad, then even if we are convinced that death can harm the one who dies, we will still want to ask, “But is death something to be troubled by?” 3. Is. It. Rational. to. Fear. Death?

Author: Fred Feldman

Publisher: Oxford University Press

ISBN: 9780190271459

Category: Death

Page: 528

View: 970

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Death has long been a pre-occupation of philosophers, and this is especially so today. The Oxford Handbook of Philosophy of Death collects 21 newly commissioned essays that cover current philosophical thinking of death-related topics across the entire range of the discipline. These include metaphysical topics--such as the nature of death, the possibility of an afterlife, the nature of persons, and how our thinking about time affects what we think about death--as well as axiological topics, such as whether death is bad for its victim, what makes it bad to die, what attitude it is fitting to take towards death, the possibility of posthumous harm, and the desirability of immortality. The contributors also explore the views of ancient philosophers such as Aristotle, Plato and Epicurus on topics related to the philosophy of death, and questions in normative ethics, such as what makes killing wrong when it is wrong, and whether it is wrong to kill fetuses, non-human animals, combatants in war, and convicted murderers. With chapters written by a wide range of experts in metaphysics, ethics, and conceptual analysis, and designed to give the reader a comprehensive view of recent developments in the philosophical study of death, this Handbook will appeal to a broad audience in philosophy, particularly in ethics and metaphysics.

Risk of Death in Canada

A complicated series of “ causes ” can explain how someone died . Causes of death can be identified in several ways . Stating the cause of death involves selecting one of these ways . Ultimately , everyone dies of the same final cause ...

Author: Simon P. Thomas

Publisher: University of Alberta

ISBN: 0888642997

Category: Business & Economics

Page: 272

View: 207

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Presented in clear, accessible language, Risk of Death in Canada offers both a summary of health risk information and an explanation of the underlying source and certainty of that information. Thomas and Hrudey explain both how we understand risk and how we respond to it. Through such topics as uncertainty, data collection, risk perception and risk analysis and highlighted by tables, graphs, figures and extensive supplementary material - Risk of death in Canada provides a valuable guide for students and professionals in medicine, nursing, health sciences, health promotion and public policy. This comprehensive overview provides valuable insights on a matter of importance to every individual.

The Metaphysics and Ethics of Death

This volume is the first to bring together original essays that both address the fundamental questions of the metaphysics of death and explore the relationship between those questions and some of the areas of applied ethics in which they ...

Author: James Stacey Taylor

Publisher: Oxford University Press

ISBN: 9780199315543

Category: Philosophy

Page: 304

View: 466

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The questions that surround death--Is death a harm to the person who dies? Should we be afraid of death? Can the dead be harmed? Can they be wronged?--have been of widespread interest since Classical times. This interest is currently enjoying a renaissance across a broad spectrum of philosophical fields, ranging from metaphysics to bioethics. This volume is the first to bring together original essays that both address the fundamental questions of the metaphysics of death and explore the relationship between those questions and some of the areas of applied ethics in which they play a central role. The essays in Part I of this volume examine some of the Classical approaches to fundamental metaphysical questions surrounding death, addressing in particular the question of whether a person's death can be a harm to her. The theme of the value of death is continued in Part II, with essays addressing this issue through a more contemporary lens. The essays in Part III address the related but separate issue of whether persons can be harmed by events that occur after they die. Finally, the essays in Part IV apply the metaphysical issues addressed in Parts I through III to various issues in bioethics, including the question of posthumous organ procurement, suicide, and survival after brain injury. Written by some of the most prominent philosophers working on these issues today, the essays in this volume showcase the state of the art of both the metaphysics of death and its importance to many areas of applied ethics.