British Logic in the Nineteenth Century

The present volume of the Handbook of the History of Logic is designed to establish 19th century Britain as a substantial force in logic, developing new ideas, some of which would be overtaken by, and other that would anticipate, the ...

Author: Dov M. Gabbay

Publisher: North Holland

ISBN: 0444516107

Category: Mathematics

Page: 750

View: 581

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The present volume of the Handbook of the History of Logic is designed to establish 19th century Britain as a substantial force in logic, developing new ideas, some of which would be overtaken by, and other that would anticipate, the century's later capitulation to the mathematization of logic. British Logic in the Nineteenth Century is indispensable reading and a definitive research resource for anyone with an interest in the history of logic. - Detailed and comprehensive chapters covering the entire range of modal logic - Contains the latest scholarly discoveries and interpretative insights that answer many questions in the field of logic

British Logic in the Nineteenth Century

HANDBOOK of THE HISTORY OF LOGIC VOLUME 4 BRITISH LOGIC IN THE NINETEENTH CENTURY Edited by Dov M. Gabbay John Woods NORTH-HOLLAND Volume 4 British Logic in the Nineteenth Century Volume 4. Front Cover.

Author: Dov M. Gabbay

Publisher: Elsevier

ISBN: 0080557015

Category: Mathematics

Page: 750

View: 398

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The present volume of the Handbook of the History of Logic is designed to establish 19th century Britain as a substantial force in logic, developing new ideas, some of which would be overtaken by, and other that would anticipate, the century's later capitulation to the mathematization of logic. British Logic in the Nineteenth Century is indispensable reading and a definitive research resource for anyone with an interest in the history of logic. - Detailed and comprehensive chapters covering the entire range of modal logic - Contains the latest scholarly discoveries and interpretative insights that answer many questions in the field of logic

John Venn

French “logique” and Britishlogic”: On the origins of Augustus De Morgan's early logical inquiries, 1805–1835. In D. M. Gabbay and J. Woods (eds.), Handbook of the History of Logic. Vol. 4, British Logic in the Nineteenth Century.

Author: Lukas M. Verburgt

Publisher: University of Chicago Press

ISBN: 9780226815510

Category: Biography & Autobiography

Page: 435

View: 255

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Presents a biographical sketch of English logician and man of letters John Venn (1834-1923), compiled as part of the MacTutor History of Mathematics Archive of the School of Mathematics and Statistics at the University of Saint Andrews in Scotland. Notes that Venn compiled a history of Cambridge University.

Telling the Time in British Literature 1675 1830

2008. Handbook of the History of Logic, Volume 4, British Logic in the Nineteenth Century. Amsterdam: North-Holland, 33–74. Molesworth, William, ed. 1845. The English Works of Thomas Hobbes, Vol. 7. London. Neill, Patrick. 1823.

Author: Marcus Tomalin

Publisher: Routledge

ISBN: 9781000042085

Category: Literary Criticism

Page: 210

View: 453

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Although the broad topic of time and literature in the long eighteenth century has received focused attention from successive generations of literary critics, this book adopts a radically new approach to the subject. Taking inspiration from recent revisionist accounts of the horological practices of the age, as well as current trends in ecocriticism, historical prosody, sensory history, social history, and new materialism, it offers a pioneering investigation of themes that have never previously received sustained critical scrutiny. Specifically, it explores how the essayists, poets, playwrights, and novelists of the period meditated deeply upon the physical form, social functions, and philosophical implications of particular time-telling objects. Consequently, each chapter considers a different device – mechanical watches, pendulums, sandglasses, sundials, flowers, and bells – and the literary responses of significant figures such as Alexander Pope, Anne Steele, William Wordsworth, Samuel Taylor Coleridge, Charlotte Smith, and William Hazlitt are carefully examined.

Bad Logic

Professions of Taste: Henry James, British Aestheticism, and Commodity Culture. ... British Logic in the Nineteenth Century. Vol. 4 of Handbook of the History of Logic, edited by Dov M. Gabbay and John Woods. Amsterdam: Elsevier, 2008.

Author: Daniel Wright

Publisher: JHU Press

ISBN: 9781421425184

Category: Literary Criticism

Page: 232

View: 446

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This book will interest a range of scholars working in Victorian literature, gender and sexuality studies, and interdisciplinary approaches to literature and philosophy.

The Trinity Circle

... 1991), 59–60; and Panteki, “French 'Logique' and British 'Logic': On the Origins of Augustus De Morgan's Early Logical Inquiries, 1805–1835,” in Handbook of the History of Logic, vol. 4, British Logic in the Nineteenth Century, ed.

Author: William J. Ashworth

Publisher: University of Pittsburgh Press

ISBN: 9780822988458

Category: Science

Page: 264

View: 487

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The Trinity Circle explores the creation of knowledge in nineteenth-century England, when any notion of a recognizably modern science was still nearly a century off, religion still infused all ways of elite knowing, and even those who denied its relevance had to work extremely hard to do so. The rise of capitalism during this period—embodied by secular faith, political radicalism, science, commerce, and industry—was, according to Anglican critics, undermining this spiritual world and challenging it with a superficial material one: a human-centric rationalist society hell-bent on measurable betterment via profit, consumption, and a prevalent notion of progress. Here, William J. Ashworth places the politics of science within a far more contested context. By focusing on the Trinity College circle, spearheaded from Cambridge by the polymath William Whewell, he details an ongoing struggle between the Established Church and a quest for change to the prevailing social hierarchy. His study presents a far from unified view of science and religion at a time when new ways of thinking threatened to divide England and even the Trinity College itself.

Logic A History of its Central Concepts

Although Aristotelian and Lockean influences are clearly at work in them, Whately's logical writings reinforce the Port ... see James Van Evra's contribution to British Logic in the Nineteenth Century, volume 4 of this Handbook, [2008].

Author: Dov M. Gabbay

Publisher: Newnes

ISBN: 9780080931708

Category: Mathematics

Page: 708

View: 714

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The Handbook of the History of Logic is a multi-volume research instrument that brings to the development of logic the best in modern techniques of historical and interpretative scholarship. It is the first work in English in which the history of logic is presented so extensively. The volumes are numerous and large. Authors have been given considerable latitude to produce chapters of a length, and a level of detail, that would lay fair claim on the ambitions of the project to be a definitive research work. Authors have been carefully selected with this aim in mind. They and the Editors join in the conviction that a knowledge of the history of logic is nothing but beneficial to the subject's present-day research programmes. One of the attractions of the Handbook's several volumes is the emphasis they give to the enduring relevance of developments in logic throughout the ages, including some of the earliest manifestations of the subject. Covers in depth the notion of logical consequence Discusses the central concept in logic of modality Includes the use of diagrams in logical reasoning

Mathematics in Victorian Britain

The most ample historical survey of British algebraic logic is British Logic in the Nineteenth Century (ed. D. M. Gabbay and J. Woods), Vol. 4 of the Handbook of the History of Logic (Elsevier, 2007). Still valuable is L. Liard's Les ...

Author: Raymond Flood

Publisher: Oxford University Press

ISBN: 9780199601394

Category: Mathematics

Page: 466

View: 167

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With a foreword by Adam Hart-Davis, this book constitutes perhaps the first general survey of the mathematics of the Victorian period. It charts the institutional development of mathematics as a profession, as well as exploring the numerous innovations made during this time, many of which are still familiar today.

Apropos of Something

Dov M. Gabbay and John Woods, vol. 4, British Logic in the Nineteenth Century (Oxford: Elsevier, 2008), 75–91; John Stuart Mill, “On Fallacies,” in A System of Logic, Ratiocinative and Inductive, ed. J. M. Robson, in Collected Works of ...

Author: Elisa Tamarkin

Publisher: University of Chicago Press

ISBN: 9780226453125

Category: Meaning (Philosophy)

Page: 448

View: 870

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"Before 1800 nothing was irrelevant. So argues Elisa Tamarkin's sweeping cultural history of a key shift in consciousness: the arrival, around 1800, of "relevance" as the means to grasp how something previously disregarded becomes important and interesting. At a time when so much makes claims to attention every day, how does one decide what is most valuable right now? This is not only a contemporary problem. For Ralph Waldo Emerson, the question for the nineteenth century was how, in the immensity and "succession" of objects, anything becomes a proper object of experience. How that question was finally defined as one of relevance is the story of Apropos of Nothing. Relevance, Tamarkin shows, was primarily an Anglo-American concept. It engaged major intellectual figures, centrally the pragmatists-William James, Alain Locke, and John Dewey-and before them thinkers including Emerson and Alfred North Whitehead. Most of all, relevance was a problem for the worlds of art, literature, education, and criticism. These were fascinated by how old, boring, distant, or unfamiliar things get taken in; how they are admitted as meaningful; how they come home to us like the ludicrous raven comes to Edgar Allan Poe's student in the middle of the night in some obscure connection with himself. Many nineteenth-century American artists saw their paintings as pragmatic works that make relevance-that suggest versions of events that feel apropos of our world the moment we see them. (Tamarkin's book is richly illustrated, in color, with works by Winslow Homer, Abbott Handerson Thayer, Edgar Degas, and others.) Relevance remains a conundrum, especially for the humanities. It obliges us to say why we admit Poe's poem-or, say, a line of Emerson's-is interesting enough to study it, to dedicate ourselves to understanding it, to affirming that this effort is, in Emerson's words, "relevant to me and mine, to nature, and the hour that now passes.""--

John Venn

“Hugh MacColl and the Birth of Logical Pluralism,” in Dov. M. Gabbay and John Woods, eds., Handbook of the History of Logic. Volume 4: British Logic in the Nineteenth Century (Amsterdam & Boston: North Holland, ...

Author: John Venn

Publisher: Springer Nature

ISBN: 9783030798291

Category: Logic

Page:

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This is the first book to present a carefully chosen and annotated selection of the unpublished writings and correspondence of the English logician John Venn (1834-1923). Today remembered mainly as the inventor of the famous diagram that bears his name, Venn was an important figure of nineteenth-century Cambridge, where he worked alongside leading thinkers, such as Henry Sidgwick and Alfred Marshall, on the development of the Moral Sciences Tripos. Venn published three influential textbooks on logic, contributed some dozen articles to the then newly-established journal Mind, of which he became co-editor in 1892, and counted F.W. Maitland, William Cunningham and Arthur Balfour among his pupils. After his active career as a logician, which ended around the turn of the 20th century, Venn reinvented himself as a biographer of his University, College and family. Together with his son, he worked on the massive Alumni Cantabrigienses, which is still used today as a standard reference source. The material presented here, including the 100-page Annals: Autobiographical Sketch, provides much new information on Venn's philosophical development and Cambridge in the 1850s-60s. It also brings to light Venn's relation with famous colleagues and friends, such as Leslie Stephen, Francis Galton, and William Stanley Jevons, thereby placing him at the heart of Victorian intellectual life. .