Beyond Caring

Chambliss shows how patients-- many weak and helpless--too often become objects of the bureaucratic machinery of the health care system, and how ethics decisions--once the dilemmas of troubled individuals--become the setting for political ...

Author: Daniel F. Chambliss

Publisher: University of Chicago Press

ISBN: 0226101029

Category: Medical

Page: 218

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Provides eyewitness accounts and personal stories demonstrating how nurses turn the awesome into the routine. Chambliss shows how patients-- many weak and helpless--too often become objects of the bureaucratic machinery of the health care system, and how ethics decisions--once the dilemmas of troubled individuals--become the setting for political turf battles between occupational interest groups. The result is a combination of realism with a theoretical argument about moral life in large organizations. --From publisher description.

Beyond Caring

Hospitals, Nurses, and the Social Organization of Ethics Daniel F. Chambliss. Daniel F. Chambliss is professor of ... ( Morality and society ) Includes bibliographical references and index . 1. Nursing ethics . 2. Hospital care - Moral ...

Author: Daniel F. Chambliss

Publisher: University of Chicago Press

ISBN: 0226100715

Category: Medical

Page: 224

View: 677

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Provides eyewitness accounts and personal stories demonstrating how nurses turn the awesome into the routine. Chambliss shows how patients-- many weak and helpless--too often become objects of the bureaucratic machinery of the health care system, and how ethics decisions--once the dilemmas of troubled individuals--become the setting for political turf battles between occupational interest groups. The result is a combination of realism with a theoretical argument about moral life in large organizations. --From publisher description.

The Catholic Social Imagination

morality and society series Edited by Alan Wolfe Social Imagination Joseph M. Palacios The Catholic activism and the ... Buddhism in America Wendy Cadge Beyond Caring: Hospitals, Nurses, and the Social Organization of Ethics Daniel F.

Author: Joseph M. Palacios

Publisher: University of Chicago Press

ISBN: 9780226645025

Category: Social Science

Page: 320

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The reach of the Catholic Church is arguably greater than that of any other religion, extending across diverse political, ethnic, class, and cultural boundaries. But what is it about Catholicism that resonates so profoundly with followers who live under disparate conditions? What is it, for instance, that binds parishioners in America with those in Mexico? For Joseph M. Palacios, what unites Catholics is a sense of being Catholic—a social imagination that motivates them to promote justice and build a better world. In The Catholic Social Imagination, Palacios gives readers a feeling for what it means to be Catholic and put one’s faith into action. Tracing the practices of a group of parishioners in Oakland, California, and another in Guadalajara, Mexico, Palacios reveals parallels—and contrasts—in the ways these ordinary Catholics receive and act on a church doctrine that emphasizes social justice. Whether they are building a supermarket for the low-income elderly or waging protests to promote school reform, these parishioners provide important insights into the construction of the Catholic social imagination. Throughout, Palacios also offers important new cultural and sociological interpretations of Catholic doctrine on issues such as poverty, civil and human rights, political participation, and the natural law.

Faith in Action

Morality and Society Series Edited by Alan Wolfe The Necessity of Politics: Reclaiming American Public Life Christopher ... Village Michael Mayerfeld Bell Beyond Caring: Hospitals, Nurses, and the Social Organization of Ethics Daniel F.

Author: Richard L. Wood

Publisher: University of Chicago Press

ISBN: 9780226905969

Category: Political Science

Page: 366

View: 387

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Over the past fifteen years, associations throughout the U.S. have organized citizens around issues of equality and social justice, often through local churches. But in contrast to President Bush's vision of faith-based activism, in which groups deliver social services to the needy, these associations do something greater. Drawing on institutions of faith, they reshape public policies that neglect the disadvantaged. To find out how this faith-based form of community organizing succeeds, Richard L. Wood spent several years working with two local groups in Oakland, California—the faith-based Pacific Institute for Community Organization and the race-based Center for Third World Organizing. Comparing their activist techniques and achievements, Wood argues that the alternative cultures and strategies of these two groups give them radically different access to community ties and social capital. Creative and insightful, Faith in Action shows how community activism and religious organizations can help build a more just and democratic future for all Americans.

Heaven s Kitchen

MORALITY. AND. SOCIETY. SERIES. Edited by Alan Wolfe The Necessity of Politics: Reclaiming American Public ... Village—Michael Mayerfeld Bell • Beyond Caring: Hospitals, Nurses, and the Social Organization of Ethics—Daniel F. Chambliss ...

Author: Courtney Bender

Publisher: University of Chicago Press

ISBN: 9780226042831

Category: Social Science

Page: 199

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How do people practice religion in their everyday lives? How do our daily encounters with people who hold different religious beliefs shape the way we understand our own moral and spiritual selves? In Heaven's Kitchen, Courtney Bender takes a highly original approach to answering these questions. For more than a year she worked in New York City as a volunteer for a nonprofit, nonreligious organization called God's Love We Deliver, helping to prepare home-cooked meals for people with AIDS. Paying close attention to what was said and not said, Bender traces how the volunteers gave voice to their moral positions and religious values. She also examines how they invested their conversations, and mundane activities such as cooking, with personal meaning that in turn affected how they saw their own spiritual lives. Filled with vibrant storytelling and rich theoretical insights, Heaven's Kitchen shows faith as a living practice, reshaping our understanding of the role of religion in contemporary American life.

God and Government in the Ghetto

morality and society series Edited by Alan Wolfe God and Government in the Ghetto the politics of church-state ... Theravada Buddhism in America Wendy Cadge Beyond Caring: Hospitals, Nurses, and the Social Organization of Ethics Daniel ...

Author: Michael Leo Owens

Publisher: University of Chicago Press

ISBN: 9780226642086

Category: Social Science

Page: 304

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In recent years, as government agencies have encouraged faith-based organizations to help ensure social welfare, many black churches have received grants to provide services to their neighborhoods’ poorest residents. This collaboration, activist churches explain, is a way of enacting their faith and helping their neighborhoods. But as Michael Leo Owens demonstrates in God and Government in the Ghetto, this alliance also serves as a means for black clergy to reaffirm their political leadership and reposition moral authority in black civil society. Drawing on both survey data and fieldwork in New York City, Owens reveals that African American churches can use these newly forged connections with public agencies to influence policy and government responsiveness in a way that reaches beyond traditional electoral or protest politics. The churches and neighborhoods, Owens argues, can see a real benefit from that influence—but it may come at the expense of less involvement at the grassroots. Anyone with a stake in the changing strategies employed by churches as they fight for social justice will find God and Government in the Ghetto compelling reading.

The Making of Pro life Activists

Morality and Society Series EDITED BY ALAN WOLFE The Necessity of Politics: Reclaiming American Public Life ... of Theravada Buddhism in America WENDY CADGE Beyond Caring: Hospitals, Nurses, and the Social Organization of Ethics DANIEL ...

Author: Ziad W. Munson

Publisher: University of Chicago Press

ISBN: 9780226551210

Category: Social Science

Page: 248

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How do people become activists for causes they care deeply about? Many people with similar backgrounds, for instance, fervently believe that abortion should be illegal, but only some of them join the pro-life movement. By delving into the lives and beliefs of activists and nonactivists alike, Ziad W. Munson is able to lucidly examine the differences between them. Through extensive interviews and detailed studies of pro-life organizations across the nation, Munson makes the startling discovery that many activists join up before they develop strong beliefs about abortion—in fact, some are even pro-choice prior to their mobilization. Therefore, Munson concludes, commitment to an issue is often a consequence rather than a cause of activism. The Making of Pro-life Activists provides a compelling new model of how people become activists while also offering a penetrating analysis of the complex relationship between religion, politics, and the pro-life movement. Policy makers, activists on both sides of the issue, and anyone seeking to understand how social movements take shape will find this book essential.

Heartwood

morality and society series Edited by Alan Wolfe eartwood the first generation of theravada buddhism in america Wendy ... Love We Deliver Courtney Bender Beyond Caring: Hospitals, Nurses, and the Social Organization of Ethics Daniel F.

Author: Wendy Cadge

Publisher: University of Chicago Press

ISBN: 9780226089010

Category: Religion

Page: 279

View: 824

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Theravada is one of the three main branches of Buddhism. In Asia it is practiced widely in Thailand, Laos, Burma, Sri Lanka, and Cambodia. This fascinating ethnography opens a window onto two communities of Theravada Buddhists in contemporary America: one outside Philadelphia that is composed largely of Thai immigrants and one outside Boston that consists mainly of white converts. Wendy Cadge first provides a historical overview of Theravada Buddhism and considers its specific origins here in the United States. She then brings her findings to bear on issues of personal identity, immigration, cultural assimilation, and the nature of religion in everyday life. Her work is the first systematic comparison of the ways in which immigrant and convert Buddhists understand, practice, and adapt the Buddhist tradition in America. The men and women whom Cadge meets and observes speak directly to us in this work, both in their personal testimonials and as they meditate, pray, and practice Buddhism. Creative and insightful, Heartwood will be of enormous value to sociologists of religion and anyone wishing to understand the rise of Buddhism in the Western world.

The First Year Out

Moral Communities in Medical Science: Managing Risk in Early Human Experiments Sydney Halpern Cultural Dilemmas of ... of Theravada Buddhism in America Wendy Cadge Beyond Caring: Hospitals, Nurses, and the Social Organization of Ethics ...

Author: Tim Clydesdale

Publisher: University of Chicago Press

ISBN: 9780226110677

Category: Social Science

Page: 239

View: 487

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Wild parties, late nights, and lots of sex, drugs, and alcohol. Many assume these are the things that define an American teenager’s first year after high school. But the reality is really quite different. As Tim Clydesdale reports in The First Year Out, teenagers generally manage the increased responsibilities of everyday life immediately after graduation effectively. But, like many good things, this comes at a cost. Tracking the daily lives of fifty young people making the transition to life after high school, Clydesdale reveals how teens settle into manageable patterns of substance use and sexual activity; how they meet the requirements of postsecondary education; and how they cope with new financial expectations. Most of them, we learn, handle the changes well because they make a priority of everyday life. But Clydesdale finds that teens also stow away their identities—religious, racial, political, or otherwise—during this period in exchange for acceptance into mainstream culture. This results in the absence of a long-range purpose for their lives and imposes limits on their desire to understand national politics and global issues, sometimes even affecting the ability to reconstruct their lives when tragedies occur. The First Year Out is an invaluable resource for anyone caught up in the storm and stress of working with these young adults.

Lesser Harms

MORALITY AND SOCIETY SERIES Edited by Alan Wolfe The Necessity of Politics: Reclaiming American Public Life ... of Theravada Buddhism in America Wendy Cadge Beyond Caring: Hospitals, Nurses, and the Social Organization of Ethics Daniel ...

Author: Sydney A. Halpern

Publisher: University of Chicago Press

ISBN: 9780226314532

Category: Social Science

Page: 246

View: 569

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Research physicians face intractable dilemmas when they consider introducing new medical procedures. Innovations carry the promise of preventing or curing life-threatening diseases, but they can also lead to injury or even death. How have clinical scientists made high-stakes decisions about undertaking human tests of new medical treatments? In Lesser Harms, Sydney Halpern explores this issue as she examines vaccine trials in America during the early and mid-twentieth century. Today's scientists follow federal guidelines for research on human subjects developed during the 1960s and 1970s. But long before these government regulations, medical investigators observed informal rules when conducting human research. They insisted that the dangers of natural disease should outweigh the risks of a medical intervention, and they struggled to accurately assess the relative hazards. Halpern explores this logic of risk in immunization controversies extending as far back as the eighteenth century. Then, focusing on the period between 1930 and 1960, she shows how research physicians and their sponsors debated the moral quandaries involved in moving vaccine use from the laboratory to the clinic. This probing work vividly describes the efforts of clinical investigators to balance the benefits and dangers of untested vaccines, to respond to popular sentiment about medical hazards, and to strategically present risk laden research to sponsors and the public. “Concise and extremely well-written. . . . A fascinating synthesis of sociology, history, and institutional theory.”—Samuel C. Blackman, Journal of the American Medical Association