A Surgeon with Custer at the Little Big Horn

In letters to his beloved wife, Fannie, and in diary entries—reproduced in this volume exactly as he wrote them—DeWolf describes the terrain, weather conditions, and medical needs that he and his companions encountered along the way.

Author: James Madison DeWolf

Publisher: University of Oklahoma Press

ISBN: 9780806158129

Category: Biography & Autobiography

Page: 288

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In spring 1876 a physician named James Madison DeWolf accepted the assignment of contract surgeon for the Seventh Cavalry, becoming one of three surgeons who accompanied Custer’s battalion at the Battle of the Little Big Horn. Killed in the early stages of the battle, he might easily have become a mere footnote in the many chronicles of this epic campaign—but he left behind an eyewitness account in his diary and correspondence. A Surgeon with Custer at the Little Big Horn is the first annotated edition of these rare accounts since 1958, and the most complete treatment to date. While researchers have known of DeWolf’s diary for many years, few details have surfaced about the man himself. In A Surgeon with Custer at the Little Big Horn, Todd E. Harburn bridges this gap, providing a detailed biography of DeWolf as well as extensive editorial insight into his writings. As one of the most highly educated men who traveled with Custer, the surgeon was well equipped to compose articulate descriptions of the 1876 campaign against the Indians, a fateful journey that began for him at Fort Lincoln, Dakota Territory, and ended on the battlefield in eastern Montana Territory. In letters to his beloved wife, Fannie, and in diary entries—reproduced in this volume exactly as he wrote them—DeWolf describes the terrain, weather conditions, and medical needs that he and his companions encountered along the way. After DeWolf’s death, his colleague Dr. Henry Porter, who survived the conflict, retrieved his diary and sent it to DeWolf’s widow. Later, the DeWolf family donated it to the Little Bighorn Battlefield National Monument. Now available in this accessible and fully annotated format, the diary, along with the DeWolf’s personal correspondence, serves as a unique primary resource for information about the Little Big Horn campaign and medical practices on the western frontier.

A Surgeon with Custer at the Little Big Horn

Petersen, Edward S. “Surgeons of the Little Big Horn.” Westerners' Brand Book 31 (August 1974): 41–43. Philbrick, Nathaniel. The Last Stand: Custer, Sitting Bull, and the Battle of the Little Bighorn. New York: Penguin, 2010.

Author: James Madison DeWolf

Publisher: University of Oklahoma Press

ISBN: 9780806158136

Category: Biography & Autobiography

Page: 288

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In spring 1876 a physician named James Madison DeWolf accepted the assignment of contract surgeon for the Seventh Cavalry, becoming one of three surgeons who accompanied Custer’s battalion at the Battle of the Little Big Horn. Killed in the early stages of the battle, he might easily have become a mere footnote in the many chronicles of this epic campaign—but he left behind an eyewitness account in his diary and correspondence. A Surgeon with Custer at the Little Big Horn is the first annotated edition of these rare accounts since 1958, and the most complete treatment to date. While researchers have known of DeWolf’s diary for many years, few details have surfaced about the man himself. In A Surgeon with Custer at the Little Big Horn, Todd E. Harburn bridges this gap, providing a detailed biography of DeWolf as well as extensive editorial insight into his writings. As one of the most highly educated men who traveled with Custer, the surgeon was well equipped to compose articulate descriptions of the 1876 campaign against the Indians, a fateful journey that began for him at Fort Lincoln, Dakota Territory, and ended on the battlefield in eastern Montana Territory. In letters to his beloved wife, Fannie, and in diary entries—reproduced in this volume exactly as he wrote them—DeWolf describes the terrain, weather conditions, and medical needs that he and his companions encountered along the way. After DeWolf’s death, his colleague Dr. Henry Porter, who survived the conflict, retrieved his diary and sent it to DeWolf’s widow. Later, the DeWolf family donated it to the Little Bighorn Battlefield National Monument. Now available in this accessible and fully annotated format, the diary, along with the DeWolf’s personal correspondence, serves as a unique primary resource for information about the Little Big Horn campaign and medical practices on the western frontier.

Deliverance from the Little Big Horn

Doctor Henry Porter and Custer's Seventh Cavalry Joan Nabseth Stevenson ... Battle of the Little Big Horn, Entry 13, Surgeon General of the Army, RG 94, NARA; Williams, Military Register of Custer '5 Last Command, 251. 10.

Author: Joan Nabseth Stevenson

Publisher: University of Oklahoma Press

ISBN: 9780806187921

Category: Biography & Autobiography

Page: 232

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Of the three surgeons who accompanied Custer’s Seventh Cavalry on June 25, 1876, only the youngest, twenty-eight-year-old Henry Porter, survived that day’s ordeal, riding through a gauntlet of Indian attackers and up the steep bluffs to Major Marcus Reno’s hilltop position. But the story of Dr. Porter’s wartime exploits goes far beyond the battle itself. In this compelling narrative of military endurance and medical ingenuity, Joan Nabseth Stevenson opens a new window on the Battle of the Little Big Horn by re-creating the desperate struggle for survival during the fight and in its wake. As Stevenson recounts in gripping detail, Porter’s life-saving work on the battlefield began immediately, as he assumed the care of nearly sixty soldiers and two Indian scouts, attending to wounds and performing surgeries and amputations. He evacuated the critically wounded soldiers on mules and hand litters, embarking on a hazardous trek of fifteen miles that required two river crossings, the scaling of a steep cliff, and a treacherous descent into the safety of the steamboat Far West, waiting at the mouth of the Little Big Horn River. There began a harrowing 700-mile journey along the Yellowstone and Missouri Rivers to the post hospital at Fort Abraham Lincoln near Bismarck, Dakota Territory. With its new insights into the role and function of the army medical corps and the evolution of battlefield medicine, this unusual book will take its place both as a contribution to the history of the Great Sioux War and alongside such vivid historical novels as Son of the Morning Star and Little Big Man. It will also ensure that the selfless deeds of a lone “contract” surgeon—unrecognized to this day by the U.S. government—will never be forgotten.

Custer and the Little Bighorn

Custer's men galloped through a gap in the rebel line and at a ford in Sayler's Creek in Virginia, reached Lee's ... He turned to attack again, but his brother grabbed his horse, placed him under arrest, and sent him back to a surgeon.

Author: Jim Donovan

Publisher: Crestline

ISBN: 9780785825890

Category: Biography & Autobiography

Page: 224

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This is the first major illustrated book to examine the life and death of General Custer.

Black Elk

124 “Custer was coming at last”: William O. Taylor, With Custer on the Little Bighorn: A Newly Discovered First Person ... 2–3; Thomas R. Buecker, ed., “A Surgeon at the Little Big Horn,” Montana, The Magazine of Western History 32, no.

Author: Joe Jackson

Publisher: Farrar, Straus and Giroux

ISBN: 9780374709617

Category: Biography & Autobiography

Page: 624

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Winner of the Society of American Historians' Francis Parkman Prize Winner of the PEN / Jacqueline Bograd Weld Award for Biography Best Biography of 2016, True West magazine Winner of the Western Writers of America 2017 Spur Award, Best Western Biography Finalist, National Book Critics Circle Award for Biography Long-listed for the Cundill History Prize One of the Best Books of 2016, The Boston Globe The epic life story of the Native American holy man who has inspired millions around the world Black Elk, the Native American holy man, is known to millions of readers around the world from his 1932 testimonial Black Elk Speaks. Adapted by the poet John G. Neihardt from a series of interviews with Black Elk and other elders at the Pine Ridge Reservation in South Dakota, Black Elk Speaks is one of the most widely read and admired works of American Indian literature. Cryptic and deeply personal, it has been read as a spiritual guide, a philosophical manifesto, and a text to be deconstructed—while the historical Black Elk has faded from view. In this sweeping book, Joe Jackson provides the definitive biographical account of a figure whose dramatic life converged with some of the most momentous events in the history of the American West. Born in an era of rising violence between the Sioux, white settlers, and U.S. government troops, Black Elk killed his first man at the Little Bighorn, witnessed the death of his second cousin Crazy Horse, and traveled to Europe with Buffalo Bill’s Wild West show. Upon his return, he was swept up in the traditionalist Ghost Dance movement and shaken by the Massacre at Wounded Knee. But Black Elk was not a warrior, instead accepting the path of a healer and holy man, motivated by a powerful prophetic vision that he struggled to understand. Although Black Elk embraced Catholicism in his later years, he continued to practice the old ways clandestinely and never refrained from seeking meaning in the visions that both haunted and inspired him. In Black Elk, Jackson has crafted a true American epic, restoring to its subject the richness of his times and gorgeously portraying a life of heroism and tragedy, adaptation and endurance, in an era of permanent crisis on the Great Plains.

Custer the Seventh Cavalry and the Little Big Horn

James M. DeWolf, Acting Assistant Surgeon, U. S. Army: His Record ofthe Sioux Expedition Of1876 As Kept until His Death,” Part ... This article claims he was a survivor of the Battle of the Little Bighorn, but he was not at the battle.

Author: Mike O'Keefe

Publisher: University of Oklahoma Press

ISBN: 9780806188140

Category: History

Page: 944

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Since the shocking news first broke in 1876 of the Seventh Cavalry’s disastrous defeat at the Little Big Horn, fascination with the battle—and with Lieutenant George Armstrong Custer—has never ceased. Widespread interest in the subject has spawned a vast outpouring of literature, which only increases with time. This two-volume bibliography of Custer literature is the first to be published in some twenty-five years and the most complete ever assembled. Drawing on years of research, Michael O’Keefe has compiled entries for roughly 3,000 books and 7,000 articles and pamphlets. Covering both nonfiction and fiction (but not juvenile literature), the bibliography focuses on events beginning with Custer’s tenure at West Point during the 1850s and ending with the massacre at Wounded Knee in 1890. Included within this span are Custer’s experiences in the Civil War and in Texas, the 1873 Yellowstone and 1874 Black Hills expeditions, the Great Sioux War of 1876–77, and the Seventh Cavalry’s pursuit of the Nez Perces in 1877. The literature on Custer, the Battle of the Little Big Horn, and the Seventh Cavalry touches the entire American saga of exploration, conflict, and settlement in the West, including virtually all Plains Indian tribes, the frontier army, railroading, mining, and trading. Hence this bibliography will be a valuable resource for a broad audience of historians, librarians, collectors, and Custer enthusiasts.

Custer and the Little Big Horn

Godfrey developed an increasing antipathy to Reno and a strong devotion to Elizabeth Custer , but Graham ... T. M. Coughlan , " The Battle of the Little Big Horn : A Tactical Study , " Cavalry Journal 43 ( January February 1934 ) ...

Author: Charles K. Hofling

Publisher: Wayne State University Press

ISBN: 0814318142

Category: History

Page: 140

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In this book, Hofling turns his attention to the psychological context in which Custer operated in order to understand the decisions which produced his final disaster.

Death at the Little Bighorn

Not long after graduation, he had promptly enlisted as assistant surgeon in the 7th Cavalry in late April 1871, casting his fate with Custer as now in advancing ever closer to the Cheyenne village. However, for facing his greatest ...

Author: Phillip Thomas Tucker

Publisher: Skyhorse

ISBN: 9781634508063

Category: History

Page: 428

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On the hot Sunday afternoon of June 25, 1876, Lieutenant Colonel George Armstrong Custer decided to go for broke. After dividing his famed 7th Cavalry, he ordered his senior officer, Major Marcus A. Reno, to strike the southern end of the vast Indian encampment along the Little Bighorn River, while Custer would launch a bold flank attack to hit the village's northern end. Custer needed to charge across the river at Medicine Tail Coulee Ford. We all know the ultimate outcome of this decision, but this groundbreaking new book proves that Custer's tactical plan was not so ill-conceived. The enemy had far superior numbers and more advanced weaponry. But Custer's plan could still have succeeded, as his tactics were fundamentally sound. Relying on Indian accounts that have been largely ignored by historians, this is also a story of the Sioux and Cheyenne warriors. Custer’s last move was repulsed, resulting in withdrawal to the high ground above the ford… and it was here, on the open and exposed slopes and hilltops, that Custer and his five companies were destroyed in systematic fashion. This book tells for the first time the forgotten story of the true turning point of America's most iconic battle. Skyhorse Publishing, as well as our Arcade imprint, are proud to publish a broad range of books for readers interested in history--books about World War II, the Third Reich, Hitler and his henchmen, the JFK assassination, conspiracies, the American Civil War, the American Revolution, gladiators, Vikings, ancient Rome, medieval times, the old West, and much more. While not every title we publish becomes a New York Times bestseller or a national bestseller, we are committed to books on subjects that are sometimes overlooked and to authors whose work might not otherwise find a home.

Troopers with Custer

IN ALL THE ACCOUNTS which have been written of the battle of the Little Big Horn, but little mention ever has been made of the prominent parts taken by two modest heroes of Custer's last campaign, Dr. H. R. Porter, a civilian surgeon ...

Author: E. A. Brininstool

Publisher: Stackpole Books

ISBN: 9780811767125

Category: History

Page:

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“The stories contained herein are all of actual happenings and actual participants; here are no fictitious names, no colored circumstances. They are part of the real history of the West, and for that reason I am not ashamed to place this volume in the hands of any interested boy or girl, youth or elderly person, who may desire to know the truth about one of the leading Indian battles, and other important frontier happenings pertaining thereto, and the men who played leading parts therein. Every character mentioned in each chapter was a living, breathing person, and every incident related in this book can be vouched for and verified.” From Troopers with Custer. Although everyone in Custer’s immediate command was killed during the fighting at the Battle of Little Big Horn on June 25-26, 1876, others who participated in the battle survived. Troopers with Custer tells their stories, often in their own words.

Hokahey A Good Day to Die

The Indian Casualties of the Custer Fight Richard G. Hardorff. Stewart , Edgar I. Custer's Luck . Norman : Univ . of Okla . Press , 1955 . ... Buecker , Thomas S. “ A Surgeon on the Little Big Horn . ” Montana , the Magazine of Western ...

Author: Richard G. Hardorff

Publisher: U of Nebraska Press

ISBN: 0803273223

Category: History

Page: 174

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Traditionally historians of the Little Big Horn fight have focused on Custer and his troops?on what they were doing and where they died. But as one Miniconjou warrior told a gathering at a 1926 commemoration of the battle, the Lakotas and Cheyennes also lost brave men. These men had died defending their homes and families, and they too deserved recognition.øHokahey! A Good Day to Die! details the final moments of each of the fallen Cheyenne and Lakota heroes. Richard G. Hardorff sifted through the many interviews with Indian survivors of the battle, cross-checking every story of a wounded or dead individual to ascertain who was killed, in which action, and by whom. He concludes that the Indian dead comprised thirty-one men, six women, and four children?astonishingly light losses when compared with the number of cavalry dead. Concise, well-written, and respectful of Cheyenne and Lakota cultural practices, this book is an essential contribution to our understanding of how the Cheyennes and Lakotas waged the Battle of the Little Big Horn.